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  • The researchers linked visual depictions of friends and strangers to their colaughter in order to determine if the infants could tie colaughter to judgments about human relationships. Infants saw two types of video clips of actors interacting: in one, two women faced and smiled at each other, as if they were friends (A); in another, the two women turned their backs to each other, indicating that they were strangers (B). Both videos froze on a still frame of the actors facing the infant with neutral expressions. Infants then heard alternating audio recordings of friends’ laughter or strangers’ laughter.
    Athena Vouloumanos, NYU's Department of Psychology
    The researchers linked visual depictions of friends and strangers to their colaughter in order to determine if the infants could tie colaughter to judgments about human relationships. Infants saw two types of video clips of actors interacting: in one, two women faced and smiled at each other, as if they were friends (A); in another, the two women turned their backs to each other, indicating that they were strangers (B). Both videos froze on a still frame of the actors facing the infant with neutral expressions. Infants then heard alternating audio recordings of friends’ laughter or strangers’ laughter.
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