X
  • A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at SLAC, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don’t work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air.
    Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at SLAC, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don’t work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air.
  • A new compact antenna for very low frequency (VLF) transmissions, developed and tested at SLAC, consists of a 4-inch-long piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at center) that generates VLF radiation.
    Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    A new compact antenna for very low frequency (VLF) transmissions, developed and tested at SLAC, consists of a 4-inch-long piezoelectric crystal (clear rod at center) that generates VLF radiation.
  • SLAC’s Mark Kemp and his collaborators are testing a new antenna for very low frequency (VLF) radiation by sending signals to a transmitter 100 feet away.
    Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    SLAC’s Mark Kemp and his collaborators are testing a new antenna for very low frequency (VLF) radiation by sending signals to a transmitter 100 feet away.
  • Principle of a new compact very low frequency (VLF) antenna. It consists of a rod-shaped crystal of a piezoelectric material, lithium niobate (center). An oscillating electric voltage (red wave) applied to the bottom of the rod makes it vibrate. This mechanical stress triggers an oscillating electric current (arrows) whose electromagnetic energy then gets emitted as VLF radiation (blue waves). The device can be switched during operations to tweak the wavelength of the emitted radiation and optimize the rate at which the device can transmit data.
    Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Principle of a new compact very low frequency (VLF) antenna. It consists of a rod-shaped crystal of a piezoelectric material, lithium niobate (center). An oscillating electric voltage (red wave) applied to the bottom of the rod makes it vibrate. This mechanical stress triggers an oscillating electric current (arrows) whose electromagnetic energy then gets emitted as VLF radiation (blue waves). The device can be switched during operations to tweak the wavelength of the emitted radiation and optimize the rate at which the device can transmit data.
Chat now!