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  • Researchers converted the common sugar-eating (heterotrophic) E. coli bacterium (left) so that it produced all its biomass from CO2 (autotrophic), using metabolic engineering combined with lab evolution. The new bacterium (center) uses the compound formate as a form of chemical energy to drive CO2 fixation by a synthetic metabolic pathway. The bacterium may provide the infrastructure for the future renewable production of food and green fuels (right)
    Weizmann Institute of Science
    Researchers converted the common sugar-eating (heterotrophic) E. coli bacterium (left) so that it produced all its biomass from CO2 (autotrophic), using metabolic engineering combined with lab evolution. The new bacterium (center) uses the compound formate as a form of chemical energy to drive CO2 fixation by a synthetic metabolic pathway. The bacterium may provide the infrastructure for the future renewable production of food and green fuels (right)
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