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  • Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, members of co-author Kristine DeLong's lab drill into coral reefs to extract samples on Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys.Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, members of co-author Kristine DeLong's lab drill into coral reefs to extract samples on Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys.
    Courtesy of Kristine DeLong, Louisiana State University
    Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, members of co-author Kristine DeLong's lab drill into coral reefs to extract samples on Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys.Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, members of co-author Kristine DeLong's lab drill into coral reefs to extract samples on Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys.
  • Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, co-author Kristine DeLong and a colleague stand behind a fossilized coral reef boulder dating back to the last interglacial that washed ashore on Little Cayman.
    Courtesy of Kristine DeLong, Louisiana State University
    Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. Here, co-author Kristine DeLong and a colleague stand behind a fossilized coral reef boulder dating back to the last interglacial that washed ashore on Little Cayman.
  • Rice University scientist Sylvia Dee led a study that determined Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement.
    Jeff Fitlow/Rice University
    Rice University scientist Sylvia Dee led a study that determined Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement.
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