Expert Pitch
University of New Hampshire

Jason Sokol: Expert Comment Available on History of Gun Control Act

20-Mar-2018 11:05 AM EDT, by University of New Hampshire

Jason Sokol: Expert Comment Available on History of Gun Control Act

Newswise — DURHAM, N.H. – As the anti-gun rally “March for Our Lives” grows closer, Jason Sokol, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, and author of “THE HEAVENS MIGHT CRACK: The Death and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.,” is available to comment on the tragic and fateful events that ultimately helped push through gun control legislation in 1968.

Sokol reminds us that the shooting death of Martin Luther King, Jr. played a crucial role in the history of gun control politics. He writes, “King’s assassination set in motion a dynamic that ultimately led to the passage of the Gun Control Act later in 1968.” Sokol outlines how the murder of King, together with the murder of Robert F. Kennedy two months later, pushed Congress to pass the first major piece of gun control legislation since the 1930s.

Sokol can discuss the parallels between today’s tragedies and the violent times of 1968. He can talk about how the assassination of King helped change the larger political environment and created a platform for Robert Kennedy’s anti-violence message to resonate. He can outline the earlier gun control groundwork laid by Senator Thomas Dodd and challenged by many others like Senator Eugene McCarthy, and finally, ironically, how Kennedy’s own assassination would help to spur the passage of an even more expansive gun control legislation.

“In the end,” Sokol writes, “the King and Kennedy assassinations, together with the urban riots, established gun control as an issue of broad public concern – one on which Congress needed to act.”

Sokol can be reached at Jason.Sokol@unh.edu or (603) 862-3024. He is available for on camera and radio interviews in UNH’s ReadyCam studio.

Photo and video:

VIDEO: https://media.unh.edu/media/t/1_m3b2pv68

A Q&A video interview with Jason Sokol, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, about his book “THE HEAVENS MIGHT CRACK: The Death and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.”

PHOTO: https://www.unh.edu/unhtoday/sites/default/files/media/sokol-the_heavens_003.jpg

CAPTION: Jason Sokol, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, has written a book, “THE HEAVENS MIGHT CRACK: The Death and Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.”, which gives context to how Americans, and others around the world, grappled with King’s death in the days, weeks, and months afterwards.

Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5679
Newswise: Efficient In-person voting observed by URI VOTES research team
Released: 30-Nov-2020 4:30 PM EST
Efficient In-person voting observed by URI VOTES research team
University of Rhode Island

The 2020 election is all but complete, but a team of researchers at the University of Rhode Island is still crunching the numbers – not the number of votes, but the statistics used to determine the efficiency of in-person voting in Rhode Island, Nebraska and Los Angeles.

Newswise: Rutgers Philosophy Professor Analyzes Justice Issues in New Podcast
Released: 30-Nov-2020 9:30 AM EST
Rutgers Philosophy Professor Analyzes Justice Issues in New Podcast
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers-New Brunswick philosophy Professor Derrick Darby is helping to bring logic and data to discussions on the struggle for justice in America and globally in A Pod Called Quest.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 4:25 PM EST
Those darn property taxes! Insights from Texas tax protests
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

Everyone loves to complain that their taxes are too high. Yet few people actually take the time to formally protest them. A recent deep-dive into property tax appeals in Texas offers new insights on what motivates people to protest or accept their tax obligations.

Newswise: Biden administration vs. COVID-19: U-M experts can discuss
Released: 19-Nov-2020 4:55 PM EST
Biden administration vs. COVID-19: U-M experts can discuss
University of Michigan

University of Michigan epidemiologists are available to discuss the challenges President-elect Joe Biden’s administration will face in combating the coronavirus when he takes the reins in January.To schedule an interview, contact Nardy Baeza Bickel at nbbickel@umich.edu or text 616-550-4531.Emily Toth MartinEmily Toth Martin, associate professor of epidemiology at the U-M School of Public Health, is an infectious disease epidemiologist who has been using COVID-19 public health data to help inform mitigation and policy.

Newswise: NEW: Youth vote up significantly in 2020; young people of color pivotal
Released: 19-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
NEW: Youth vote up significantly in 2020; young people of color pivotal
Tufts University

Presidential election turnout among young people ages 18-29 reached 52-55%, significantly higher than the 45-48% turnout of 2016, according to a new youth turnout estimate released today from CIRCLE at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life.


Showing results

110 of 5679

close
2.03759