Expert Directory

Showing results 1 – 20 of 26

Disaster Recovery, sociological research

Lori Peek is director of the Natural Hazards Center and professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. She studies vulnerable populations in disaster and has conducted field investigations in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Hurricane Katrina, the BP Oil Spill, the Christchurch earthquakes, the Joplin tornado, Superstorm Sandy, and Hurricane Matthew. She is currently co-leading a National Science Foundation-funded workshop series on methods of interdisciplinary disaster research and she is a member of the social science team for the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center of Excellence for Risk Based Community Resilience Planning. She is also working on several ongoing projects related to children’s health and well-being before, during, and after disaster.

Robert Lanford, Ph.D.

Dir. of Southwest National Primate Research Center

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Hepatitis, Primate Research, Liver Disease

Dr. Robert Lanford, PhD, is currently the Director of the Southwest National Primate Research Center, one of seven NIH National Primate Research Centers. He is a Scientist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center.

Dr. Robert E. Lanford received a B.S. degree from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1974 and a Ph.D. in Virology from Baylor College of Medicine in 1979. He served as Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine until 1984 when he moved to the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (now Texas Biomedical Research Institute) to initiate programs on the use of nonhuman primates as models for human hepatitis infections. Dr. Lanford has published over 170 scientific papers and serves as a reviewer for several journals.  His laboratory performs research on multiple hepatitis viruses HAV, HBV, HCV and GBV-B.  One of the primary goals of his research program is to better understand the interactions of the virus with the host, and how these interactions influence either viral clearance or persistence and disease progression. His studies in the chimpanzee were the first to use total genome microarray analysis to examine viral-host interactions and the innate immune response to HCV. In collaboration with pharmaceutical companies, he has utilized the chimpanzee model of chronic HBV and HCV infections to evaluate efficacy of new antiviral therapies as the last preclinical step prior to human clinical trials. These studies contributed to the development of cocktails of antivirals that can now cure HCV infection in 12 weeks. Recently, Dr. Lanford has developed a primate model for liver cancer by the genetic engineering of primary baboon hepatocytes with activated baboon oncogenes and autologous transplantation of the cells to the liver of the immunocompetent hepatocyte donor. Efforts are ongoing in his laboratory to develop new nonhuman primate models for HBV research.

Marcel Daadi, Ph.D.

Leader of SNPRC Regenerative Medicine & Aging Unit

Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Regenerative Medicine, Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Translational Research

Dr. Daadi is an expert in regulated translational research and has developed therapeutic neural stem cell lines (NSC) for clinical use in Parkinson’s  disease,  stroke, and to target brain tumors in both industrial and academic settings. He discovered a novel technique of engineering these stem cell lines from pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and continues to develop this therapeutic cell line for clinical use.

Dr. Daadi came to Texas Biomed in 2014 and is the team leader for the SNPRC Regenerative Medicine and Aging research unit. Results from his studies are the foundation of translational research and help to repair diseased or injured brain through transplantation of highly purified NSCs and stimulation of internal repair mechanisms.

Cancer, Cancer Research, Vitamin D, immunotheraphy, Cancer Vaccines, Genomics, Personalized Medicine, Cancer Therapies, Medical Research

President & CEO, Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Areas of expertise: cancer research, vitamin D, immunotherapy, cancer vaccines, genomics, personalized medicine, cancer therapies, medical research

Kelvin Lee, MD

Jacobs Family Chair in Immunology

Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cancer, Cancer Immunology, immunotheraphy, Cancer Vaccines, Biotech, mutiple myeloma, Medical Oncology, Medical Research

Jacobs Family Chair in Immunology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute
Cancer immunology, immunotherapy, cancer vaccines, biotech, multiple myeloma, medical oncology, medical research

IRB, IRBS, Human Research Protection Programs, Expanded Access, Expanded Access Program, FDA, Compassionate Care, clinical trial, Clinical Research, Research Ethics, Clinical Trials

Marjorie A. Speers, Ph.D., is a global leader in human research protections. Most recently, she was the inaugural president and CEO of the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs, Inc. (AAHRPP), retiring in 2013.

Dr. Speers views the opportunity to lead this one-of-a-kind foundation—and continue to contribute to research protections and public well-being worldwide—as the natural progression in an exemplary career of public service. Before establishing AAHRPP in 2001, she served as acting executive director of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission. At the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, she oversaw research protections for all domestic and international research.

Dr. Speers is a graduate of Dickinson College, where she serves on the Board of Trustees and established a scholarship that has benefited numerous international students. She also holds doctoral degrees in psychology and epidemiology from Yale University.

Cancer, Breast Cancer, Research, Womens Health, intraoperative radiotherapy

Neil B. Friedman, M.D., FACS, is Director of The Hoffberger Breast Center at Mercy as well as Medical Director of The Weinberg Center for Women's Health and Medicine at Mercy. As a catalyst for advancing breast cancer treatment, Dr. Friedman has partnered with many prestigious national and local organizations to improve the treatment options for women with breast cancer. Likewise, on a very personal level, he partners with each of his patients and their families to help them face the challenges and triumphs of living with a breast cancer diagnosis. Dr. Friedman led the charge to bring IORT, Intraoperative Radiotherapy, to Mercy making it the first hospital in Maryland to offer this leading-edge technology. 
Dr. Friedmane began his medical career as Chief Resident at the nationally renowned Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.  He is a Board Certified breast cancer doctor who is dedicated to the search for a cure for cancer. His team continues to lead breast cancer initiatives and introduce best-in-practice breast care treatment options, including Intraoperative Radiotherapy (IORT), an innovative, single-dose radiation treatment, to patients.  Dr. Friedman was named Humanitarian of the Year by the Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation for his efforts in the fight against breast cancer. He has served as a national spokesperson for breast cancer prevention for major organizations such as Bath & Bodyworks.
Dr. Friedman has been the Chairman of the American Cancer Society’s Research Administrative Committee, a member of its Executive and Professional Education Committees, and served on its Board of Directors. He has also been involved with the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation.
Dr. Friedman leads a team of clinicians devoted to breast cancer education, advocating the latest advancements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer at a number of conferences, continuing education forums, and patient seminars.
Dr. Neil Friedman remains committed in his career to find optimal treatments for breast cancer. Some of his accomplishments include:
•	Named a “Top Doc” by Baltimore magazine in the Breast Surgery category
•	Named Humanitarian of the Year by the Mildred Mindell Cancer Foundation
•	The Breast Center at Mercy Medical Center first in Maryland to offer IORT Treatment
•	Research on cancer has been published in American Journal of Public Health(APHA) and the Journal of Immunotherapy

Brexit, Ireland, EU, Peace Process, Northern Ireland, borders research, conflict analysis, Conflict, post-conflict

Dr Katy Hayward is one of the leading political sociologists on the island of Ireland, and is a Reader in Sociology, and Senior Research Fellow at the Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice at Queen’s University Belfast. Dr Hayward’s research focuses on conflict/post-conflict transitions and is actively interdisciplinary, traversing fields of border studies, conflict studies, European studies, and Irish studies. This means that she is particularly well-placed to speak about the implications of Brexit for the island of Ireland, and Northern Ireland in particular, European integration, political violence, and the application of discourse analysis.

Domestic Violence, intimate partner abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, Homicide, intimate partner homicide, Health Outcomes, Research, Nurse, Johns Hopkins, Nursing, Pregnancies, Women's Health, Gun Control, Gun Control Laws, Abuse & Trauma, abuse preventio

Jacquelyn Campbell is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV). Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. 

Her most recent research in health sequelae has been foundational for the areas of the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed and untreated Traumatic Brain Injury. She has consistently advocated for addressing health inequities of marginalized women in this country and globally affected by experiences of violence.  

She has served as Principle Investigator on 14 federally funded collaborative research investigations through the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control to examine intimate partner homicide and other forms of violence against women as well as interventions and policy initiatives to improve the justice and health care system response. This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near-lethal domestic violence, and coordinated system (justice, social services, and health) responses to address intimate partner violence.

Dr. Campbell has published more than 270 articles, 56 book chapters and seven books, in addition to developing the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. The Danger Assessment is also the basis of the Lethality Assessment Program (MNADV LAP) for first responders to assess risk of homicide of domestic violence survivors and connect those at high risk with domestic violence services. In collaboration with Dr. Nancy Glass, originator of myPlan, a decision aid for IPV survivors, she is leading an NIH-funded cultural adaptation of myPlan for immigrant and indigenous women.

Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses' Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and was founding co-chair of the IOM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Health National Institute for Nursing Research, Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing, the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award, and being named one of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence, is an active member of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group, and has served on the boards of the House of Ruth Battered Women's Shelter and four other shelters. She was a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence. 

Deborah Gross, DNSc, RN, FAAN

Endowed Chair in Psychiatric Nursing

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing

Mental Health, mental health and children , Parenting, Parenting Advice, parenting intervention, Child Psychology, Suicide, Research, Nurse, Nursing, Johns Hopkins, Chicago Parent Program, Behavior, Behavior Problem, Community Health, Public School, Psycho

Deborah Gross is best known for her work in promoting positive parent-child relationships and preventing behavior problems in preschool children from low-income neighborhoods. At Johns Hopkins, she holds joint appointments at the School of Nursing, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Medicine, and the Department of Mental Health in the Bloomberg School of Public Health. Previously, as associate dean for research and a department chair at Rush University College of Nursing, Dr. Gross and colleagues developed the innovative Chicago Parent Program, which improves parenting behavior and reduces child behavior problems. The program currently is used in a number of settings, including Head Start centers in Chicago and New York City. Dr. Gross was a Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellow, and among her many recognitions are the Friends of the National Institute for Nursing Research President's Award for outstanding research, the American Academy of Nursing Edge Runner award honoring developers of model programs offering solutions to healthcare challenges, and induction into the Sigma Theta Tau Researchers Hall of Fame. She has served on numerous review panels for the National Institutes of Health and the Institute of Medicine, published more than 100 articles, book chapters, and abstracts, and currently serves on the editorial board of Research in Nursing & Health and Nursing Outlook.

Juergen Hahn

Department Head, Biomedical Engineering

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Autism, Autism diagnosis, Autism Treatment And Research, Big Data, big data and medicine

Juergen Hahn, Department Head of Biomedical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is a trailblazer in the use of big data methods to improve the diagnosis and treatment of Autism. His research focuses on the use of machine-learning algorithms to analyze complex biological and biomedical systems. He previously developed a physiological test for autism after discovering patterns with certain metabolites in the blood that can accurately predict diagnosis. He is applying that same approach to other areas of autism research including correlating conditions and assessing the effectiveness of possible medical treatments.

Dr. Ron Walter, Ph.D.

Professor and Director Xiphophorus Genetic Stock Center

Texas State University

Science, Xiphophrus, Genetics, Molecular Bioscience, Research, Bioinformatics, Inheritance, Fish Ecology

Dr. Walter has spent his 28-year academic career at a primarily undergraduate campus that has just recently been designated an “Emerging Research Institution.” He has served in the Department of Biology (9 years) and then moved to the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry to assist in development of a Biochemistry undergraduate program. Dr. Walter developed partnership grant proposals aimed towards providing scholarships for student groups that are underrepresented in the sciences (URM). In Fall 2013, he was awarded a Bridges to Biomedicine (B2B) grant wherein Texas State University is partnering with two Alamo Community College campuses to establish a program focused on increasing success of URM students in the biomedical sciences upon transfer to the baccalaureate institution. The B2B program addresses the most important obstacles to upper-division degree completion experienced by students showing an early commitment to a biomedical career. Additionally, Dr. Walter serves as Co-PI for the South Texas Doctoral Bridge Program (STDBP).  The STDBP is aimed at student matriculation from the MS degree into highly competitive doctoral programs. The STDBP is established between the Univ. of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA, medical school) and Texas State University. The STDBP is designed to provide a combination of mentoring and student development activities as well as enhance didactics and research training during a thesis-based M.S. degree in Biochemistry.

Oncology, Big Data, Data Standards, Medical Research, Coronavirus, COVID-19

Dr. Brian Anderson is a Harvard-trained physician-scientist, innovator, and digital health expert. Dr. Anderson’s focus is on the use of information technology in support of emerging clinical decision support (CDS) models and the provision of safe, effective, patient-centered care. 
While at Athenahealth, where he led the Informatics Department, Dr. Anderson launched a new model of CDS leveraging Artificial Intelligence (AI). He has served on several national health information technology committees in partnership with the Office of the National Coordinator (ONC). 
At MITRE, Dr. Anderson works on mCODE, a standardized data language and interoperability model for cancer research and treatment, as well as architecting, implementing, and analyzing health information systems for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). He also sits on the ONC’s Health Information Technology Advisory Committee.
Dr. Anderson has written in the Journal of Precision Medicine and spoken at the Precision Medicine Summit and HIMSS19. 

Agriculture, Economics, Agribusiness, Cotton, Policy Research, Trade, Behavioral Economics

Darren Hudson is a professor and the Larry Combest Endowed Chair for Agricultural Competitiveness and Director of the International Center for Agricultural Competitiveness and the Cotton Economics Research Institute at Texas Tech University since 2008. Hudson’s research interests include agricultural policy and trade, economic development, marketing and consumer demand, and behavioral economics.  He participates in the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute consortium producing annual baseline projections for cotton for the group. Hudson is a past-President of the Southern Agricultural Economics Association an also is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association. Hudson earned his bachelor's degree in Agribusiness from West Texas A&M University and his master's and doctoral degrees in Agricultural and Applied Economics from Texas Tech University.  

Angela Alistar MD, MD

Medical Director, GI Medical Oncology, Morristown Medical Center

Atlantic Health System

Gastrointestinal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Clinical Trials, gi medical oncology researcher, Precision Oncology, Immunotherapy, inmmuno-oncology, cancer metabolism

Dr. Angela Alistar is a board-certified medical oncologist with Atlantic Hematology Oncology, Atlantic Medical Group.  Dr. Alistar is Medical Director of GI Medical Oncology at Morristown Medical Center where she is also Medical Director of the Phase 1 Breakthrough Treatment Center.  Her research focus is related to immuno-oncology and cancer metabolism in gastrointestinal cancer such as: pancreatic tumors, cholangiocarcinoma, colorectal, esophageal, gastric cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. Her clinical research projects involved active collaborative efforts with other medical departments, such as radiation oncology and surgical oncology, as well as genomics and cancer biology.

Recently, she has published in Lancet Oncology the results of a Phase 1 clinical study in pancreatic cancer that are very promising for advancing the field for this disease. This study has shown impressive synergy of a novel agent, CPI -613 in combination with chemotherapy. She is co-leading the national multi-site, randomized study of this promising combination, as well as many other phase 1-3 clinical trials.

Dr. Alistar comes to Atlantic Health System from Wake Forest School of Medicine where she had a heavy emphasis on clinical trials and clinical research. At Wake Forest, she led the GI oncology disease oriented team as a gastrointestinal medical oncology physician and researcher, bringing cutting-edge treatments to patients. She designed, secured funding for and conducted five investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, with four of them being phase one. Her work involved maintenance of a sponsor-investigator investigational new drug. She is passionate about Precision Oncology and Immunotherapies and seeks to identify novel treatment strategies for her patients.

Past positions at Wake Forest include being a member of the Translational Cancer Genomics Committee, the GI Tumor Board, Internal Medicine Grand Rounds, and the Hepatobiliary Oncology Committee. She is a member of several health care organizations, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Hospice and Palliative Care Medicine, and the American Society of Hematology, among many others. As well, she is a member and advisor for several other health care institutions. She was recently awarded the "Danny Danielson Translational Innovation Award" by Hoosier Cancer Research Network for her commitment to clinical research. 

She received her medical degree from University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj Napoca, Romania and her residency at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, NJ, where she was chief resident. After her residency, she completed a hematology oncology fellowship at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Tisch Cancer Institute. She is affiliated with Atlantic Medical Group, and is a participating provider of Atlantic Accountable Care Organization, and sees patients at Morristown Medical Center.

Gary Lyman, MD, MPH

Senior lead for health care quality and policy, HICOR

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Healthcare economics, cost of cancer care, cancer costs, value-based cancer care, Financial toxicity, Drug Costs, cost-effective cancer care, HICOR, disparities in cancer care, biosimilars, cancer outcomes, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research

While many researchers worldwide are trying to find cures for cancer, Dr. Gary Lyman has an equally daunting task: finding a cure for cancer’s skyrocketing costs and the financial toll it can take on patients and their families.

Dr. Lyman is an internationally recognized thought leader in cancer care delivery, supportive care and health care policy. His research compares the effectiveness of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies; examines clinical decision-making; explores risk modeling and precision medicine; assesses health technology research and synthesis; and delves into the factors that drive disparities in cancer care. 

In 2018, he co-co-authored a New England Journal of Medicine paper on biosimilars and what their imminent debut might mean for cancer patients, the health care industry and society. He also led an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) panel that published a position statement on biosimilars in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

A medical oncologist, hematologist and public health researcher who focuses on comparative effectiveness, health technology assessment, and health services and outcomes research, he also is interested in cancer prevention, pharmaco-economics, and cancer treatment and supportive care for the elderly. 

Dr Lyman is among the top 1% of investigators by citations in Web of Science. In addition to his work at the Hutch, Dr. Lyman holds leadership positions within the American Society of Clinical Oncology as well as the SWOG Cancer Research Network, for which he serves as executive officer for Cancer Care Delivery, Symptom Control and Quality of Life Research.

Dr. Lyman serves as a senior lead for health care quality and policy within the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research, or HICOR.

Raphael Gottardo, Ph.D.

Scientific Director, Translational Data Science Integrated Research Center

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

data-driven immunotherapy, technology convergence, Data science research, translational data, Computational Biology, Computational Science, Bioinformatics, Biostatistics, Stochastic, Flow Cytometry, data-driven research, high-speed genome sequencing

Dr. Raphael Gottardo is a computational biologist who specializes in applying rapidly evolving ideas in data science to solving problems in cancer and related diseases. As scientific director of the Translational Data Science Integrated Research Center, he is at the center of the busy intersection of biology, data science and technology at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

His goal is to expand data-driven innovations for patients by cultivating a cross-disciplinary environment in which doctors and laboratory scientists work seamlessly with their colleagues in biostatistics and computational sciences to take advantage of the flood of information made possible by advanced technologies. 

The aim is to bring scientific discoveries from research labs to the bedside sooner using data-driven approaches. To do so, bench scientists and clinical researchers from many corners of the Hutch work collaboratively with experts in data science.

Much of his work is focused on profiling the cellular components of the human immune system – using data science to understand how to make immunotherapies work better for patients. 

“It’s when you get into the details that it really becomes interesting,” he said. “The immune system is very complex, and it turns out we don’t know a whole lot about it yet. Looking at these single-cell technologies generating massive amounts of data has brought me to really cool statistical and computational challenges.”

Dr. Gottardo’s own research involves the development of computational tools for vaccine and immunology studies, including high-throughput experiments that may use flow cytometry or high-speed genome sequencing. His current studies include:
•	Statistical and computational analysis of flow cytometry data
•	Development of statistical and computational methods for single-cell genomics
•	Immune responses to malaria and HIV infection and immunization within the Human Immunology Project Consortium (HIPC)
•	Development of the HIPC database and research portal (www.immunespace.org)
•	Contribution to the Bioconductor project, an open computing resource for genomics
•	Leadership for the Vaccine and Immunology Statistical Center of the Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
•	Leadership for the Vaccine Statistical Support (VSS) Global Health Vaccine Accelerating Platform (GH-VAP) of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Dr. Gottardo is the J. Orin Edson Foundation Endowed Chair at Fred Hutch and a member of the Vaccine and Infectious Disease and Public Health Sciences Divisions. He, along with other Fred Hutch researchers, is co-leading a collaboration with the Allen Institute for Immunology to chart the human immune system by harnessing big data and emerging technologies.

An affiliate professor of statistics at the University of Washington, he teaches courses in stochastic modeling, bioinformatics and statistical computing and supervises biostatistics and statistics doctoral students on statistical-methods research for high-dimensional omics data analysis

Oncology, Medical Oncology, cancer clinical research

After graduating from the Yale School of Medicine, I completed an internship, residency and fellowship in Hematology-Oncology at Bellevue Hospital and NYU Medical Center. These experiences taught me that the key to success in medicine is to be patient focused and put the patient’s needs first - values that I continue to hold and practice every day. I am certified in Internal Medicine by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and by the Hematology and Oncology Boards. Since 1986, I was on the NYU faculty in medical oncology, rising to full professor before moving to the Yale Cancer Center in 2010, where I was the Associate Director for Clinical Research and head of GI Oncology until joining Rutgers Cancer Institute.

My clinical expertise and research interests are dedicated to early drug development and clinical pharmacology, focused on tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. I have led numerous clinical trials and have been at the forefront of clinical research in GI Oncology and have been instrumental in the approval of eight new drugs for the treatment of colon cancer. I have authored more than 150 peer-reviewed articles on cancer therapy, new drug development and clinical trials and have presented many of these study results at national meetings. I have had two R01 funded research projects on cancer pharmacodynamics and was recently awarded a Lead Academic Participating Site Grant to support NCI sponsored clinical trials. I also have been very involved with the NCI National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and have chaired ten phase 2 and phase 3 studies in the NCI cooperative groups. Since 2013, I have chaired the GI Cancer Committee for SWOG (formerly, Southwestern Oncology Group), one of the four NCTN cooperative groups. Together with my SWOG and NCTN colleagues, we strive to design and conduct the studies that set standards of care for pioneering new treatments in cancer care.

Other professional activities include reviewing scientific publications and grant applications in my capacity as Associate Editor for the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and Journal of GI Oncology. I also regularly review manuscripts for Journal of Clinical Oncology, Cancer, British Medical Journal and Lancet. I review grants for the NCI and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. I am also a Medical Director of the Chemotherapy Foundation. In my free time, I am an avid marathon runner and century cyclist.

Rutgers Cancer Institute has a rich history of conducting innovative and groundbreaking cancer research, and, together with RWJBarnabas Health, we offer unparalleled knowledge, clinical care and resources for cancer patients and their families close to home. I feel privileged to work alongside the many expert cancer providers and compassionate staff. Our overall mission is to deliver outstanding cancer care and to achieve the best outcomes for our patients in New Jersey and beyond. My vision is to bring the very best in treatment via clinical trials and clinical research to the people of New Jersey and to make us a treatment destination venue for patients around the world.

Positions:
Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Chief, GI Medical Oncology
Director of Cancer Clinical Research, Oncology Service Line, RWJBarnabas

Clinical Expertise:
GI Cancers, colon cancer, pancreatic cancer, biliary cancers, neuroendocrine tumors

Honors:
Fullbright Scholar (Brussels, Belgium), 1985-6
Best Doctor, New York Magazine or Connecticut Magazine, 1997-2017
America’s Top Doctors, 2003-2017
Top Oncology Doctors in US, 2005-2017
Grant reviewer for NCI and Cancer and Prevention Research Institute of Texas
Chair, New York Cancer Society, 2004-2006
President, International Society of Clinical Oncology, 2017-2019

Nursing, Diabetes, Teaching, Chronic Disease, Research, clinical work

Michelle Litchman, PhD, FNP-BC, FAANP, is an expert in diabetes care and using social media and other online resources to monitor how people with diabetes manage their own health in the real world. 

Litchman is an Assistant Professor at the College of Nursing and School of Medicine. Her position includes research, teaching, and clinical work at the Utah Diabetes and Endocrinology Center. She is passionate about teaching and precepts health sciences students and teaches didactic courses at the College of Nursing. Dr. Litchman’s program of research emphasizes the social context of chronic disease management across the lifespan with a particular emphasis on diabetes and technology. Her research examines online environments to understand the influence of peer support on health outcomes and diabetes management in the “real-world”. Dr. Litchman also examines family dynamics to understand how diabetes management is supported or derailed, and how technology might be helpful.

XinQi Dong, MD

Director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research (IFH)

Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

Epidemiologic, Health Care, Aging Research, Internal, Internal Medicine, Geriatric Care

Dr. XinQi Dong, MD, MPH, is director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, and the inaugural Henry Rutgers Distinguished Professor of Population Health Sciences. Dr. Dong is a population health epidemiologist and geriatrician, and has published extensively on violence prevention, elder justice and healthy aging, with more than 220 peer-reviewed publications. 

Dr. Dong has led multiple longitudinal epidemiological studies, including the New Jersey Population Health Cohort Study, currently in the design phase, and The PINE Study of 3,300 Chinese older adults to quantify relationships among culture, violence and health outcomes. Dr. Dong is the principal investigator of numerous federally-funded grants, and has mentored many trainees and faculty researchers to success. He leads the National Institute on Aging-funded P30 Asian Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR).

Dr. Dong serves on many editorial boards, was guest editor-in-chief for the Journal of Aging and Health and the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, and edited the key textbook on elder abuse – the field’s largest collection of research, practice, and policy. Dr. Dong was elected to be a Commissioner for the Commission on Law and Aging of the American Bar Association.

Dr. Dong was the recipient of the Paul Beeson Award by the National Institute on Aging; the first geriatrician to receive the National Physician Advocacy Merit Award by the Institute for Medicine as a Profession; the Nobuo Maeda International Aging and Public Health Research Award and the National Award for Excellence by the American Public Health Association; the Maxwell Pollack Award in Productive Aging, the Joseph Freeman Award, and the Powell Lawton Award by the Gerontological Society of America; the Rosalie Wolf Award by the National Committee on the Prevention of Elder Abuse; and the Outstanding Scientific Achievement for Clinical Investigation Award by the American Geriatric Society. In 2017, Dr. Dong was awarded the Ewald Busse Award by the International Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics. In 2018, he received the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Health Equity Award.

A strong advocate for advancing population health issues in under-represented communities at the local and national levels and around the world, Dr. Dong has worked with multiple institutions in China as well as the Chinese National Committee on Aging to further dialogue between the US and China on elder justice and mental health.

Dr. Dong served as a senior advisor for the Department of Health and Human Services under the Obama administration. His policy and advocacy work with the Department of Justice and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have also shaped the national agenda on the surveillance and preventive strategies combating issues of violence.

In 2011, Dr. Dong was appointed as a member of the Institute of Medicine: Global Violence Prevention Forum. Subsequently, he chaired the institute’s workshop on elder abuse prevention. In 2017, Dr. Dong was invited to be the planning committee member for the Board on Global Health to chart the future of violence prevention efforts at the National Academy of Medicine. In 2018, Dr. Dong became a member of the academy’s consensus study: Care Interventions for Individuals with Dementia and their Caregivers. In 2018, Dr. Dong was elected to the American Society of Clinical Investigation.

An immigrant to the United States, Dr. Dong grew up in a rural village near Nanjing, China. He received his bachelor’s degree in biology and economics from the University of Chicago, his medical degree at Rush University College of Medicine, and a masters in public health in epidemiology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He completed his internal medicine residency and geriatric fellowship at Yale University Medical Center.

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