Dr. Vijayanand was appointed an Associate Professor in the Division of Vaccine Discovery in 2015. He is the inaugural holder of the William K. Bowes Distinguished Professorship

Dr. Vijayanand received his M.D. from the MGR Medical University in Chennai, India, and completed his residency in Internal Medicine followed by a Pulmonary Fellowship in the United Kingdom. In 2008, he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, where he studied the mechanisms of accumulation and activation of T cells in human asthma. Since then, Dr. Vijayanand has split his time between laboratory research and seeing patients at the University of Southampton, where he currently holds an appointment as an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine. In 2007, he was awarded a prestigious National Career Development Fellowship to undertake translational studies in the epigenetic regulation of the immune cell signaling molecules in human asthma at UC San Francisco, where he was appointed adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Medicine in 2009. Two years later, Vijay joined the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology as an adjunct assistant professor in the Division of Signaling and Gene Expression.

Tumor immune fitness determines survival of lung cancer patients

"Systematically studying cancer patients’ immune cells reveals a lot of information. It is almost like judging tumor immune fitness."

Novel genomic tools provide new insight into human immune system

"Continually evolving genomic tools and single cell analysis technologies are revolutionizing our understanding of the human immune system in health and disease."

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LJI scientists uncover immune cells that may lower airway allergy and asthma risk

In a new Science Immunology study, published on June 12, 2020, scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) offer a clue to why non-allergic people don’t have a strong reaction to house dust mites. They’ve uncovered a previously unknown subset of T cells that may control allergic immune reactions and asthma from ever developing in response to house dust mites—and other possible allergens.
10-Jun-2020 05:05:33 PM EDT

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