Adina D.  Sterling, PhD

Adina D. Sterling, PhD

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior

Expertise: Organizational BehaviorLabor MarketsSocial Networks

Professor Adina D. Sterling graduated with honors from Ohio State University with a BS in chemical engineering in 2002 and graduated with her PhD from Emory in Organization and Management in 2011. She is an economic sociologist who specializes in studying the way firms and labor and product markets interact and the implications of these interactions on the prices firms get for their products, who gets hired and what they get paid, as well as the affects this has on social stratification. For instance, her work has investigated a) how initial networks evolve in organizations b) how hiring practices affect selection and wage decisions and c) how networks and prior employment affect the success of entrepreneurs.

Professor Sterling currently has projects investigating how traditional methods of hiring compare to trial employment, or when firms get the opportunity to observe individuals first-hand in organizations, such as internships prior to making hiring decisions. Her work has appeared in journals such as Management Science, Organization Science, Industrial Labor Relations Review, and the Annals of the Academy of Management. Prior to academia, Professor Sterling worked at Procter and Gamble as a senior engineer on brands such as Pampers and Oil of Olay.


Title

Cited By

Year

The employment relationship and inequality: How and why changes in employment practices are reshaping rewards in organizations

238

2013

Friendships and search behavior in labor markets

44

2014

Network progeny? Prefounding social ties and the success of new entrants

27

2012

Lasting effects? Referrals and career mobility of demographic groups in organizations

24

2017

Once in the door: Gender, tryouts, and the initial salaries of managers

22

2018

Preentry Contacts and the Generation of Nascent Networks in Organizations

22

2015

Too good to hire? Capability and inferences about commitment in labor markets

18

2020

(When) Is Hiring Strategic? Human Capital Acquisition in the Age of Algorithms

4

2018

Changing employment relationships and inequality: Causes and consequences

4

2013

CAREER MOBILITY AND RACIAL DIVERSITY IN LAW FIRMS

3

2016

Gender, Trial Employment, and Initial Salaries

3

2014

The confidence gap predicts the gender pay gap among STEM graduates

2

2020

Too Good to Hire? Capability and Commitment Inference in Labor Markets

2

2018

Shared education affiliations and workplace relationships

2

2014

On level ground? Gender, trial employment, and initial salaries

1

2014

Gender, productivity, and collaborative networks in science

1

2013

A longer way in: Tryouts as alternative hiring arrangements in organizations

0

2021

Gender pay gap among STEM graduates

0

2020

Entrepreneurial Cognition, Mindset and Selection: Developing the Talent of African Entrepreneurs

0

2019

Gender Gaps and Signals in Markets for Labor and Entrepreneurship

0

2019

No Pitches / Articles Found

"While algorithms are efficient, they often lose nuance that may have been present 10 years ago when AI was not as prevalent."

- Don’t Let Artificial Intelligence Pick Your Employees

"Employers can over-recruit through their employees’ networks, leading to a lack of diversity."

- Social Network Effects in Hiring

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