Barbie Zelizer is the Raymond Williams Professor of Communication, Associate Dean for Research, and Director of the Center for Media at Risk at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication. A former journalist, Zelizer is known for her work on journalism, culture, memory, and images, particularly in times of crisis. She has authored or edited fifteen books, including the award-winning About To Die: How News Images Move the Public (Oxford, 2010) and Remembering to Forget: Holocaust Memory Through the Camera's Eye (Chicago, 1998), and over 150 articles, book chapters, and essays. The Journalism Manifesto (co-authored with Pablo Boczkowski and C.W. Anderson) will be published by Polity Press in December 2021.

In 2020, Zelizer was elected into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and she is also a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship; a Freedom Forum Center Research Fellowship; a Fellowship from Harvard University’s Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics, and Public Policy; a Fellowship from the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies; a Fulbright Senior Scholar; a Fellowship from Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; and an ACLS Fellowship. Zelizer is also a media critic, whose work has appeared in The Nation, PBS News Hour, CNN, The Huffington Post, Newsday, Liberation, and other media organizations.

Coeditor of Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism and former Director of the Scholars Program in Culture and Communication, she is a past President of the International Communication Association, where she is also a Fellow, and a Distinguished Scholar of the National Communication Association. She is a former Judge of the Peabody Awards for Excellence in Electronic Media, and her work has been translated into French, Korean, Turkish, Romanian, Chinese, Italian, Spanish, Hebrew, and Portuguese. She is currently working on a manuscript entitled How the Cold War Drives the News.

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Title

Cited By

Year

Remembering to forget: Holocaust memory through the camera's eye

1375

1998

Remembering to forget: Holocaust memory through the camera's eye

1375

1998

Taking journalism seriously: News and the academy

1321

2004

Covering the body: The Kennedy assassination, the media, and the shaping of collective memory

1061

1992

Journalists as interpretive communities

1047

1993

Competing memories: Reading the past against the grain: The shape of memory studies

969

1995

Competing memories: Reading the past against the grain: The shape of memory studies

969

1995

Cultural memory studies: An international and interdisciplinary handbook

745

2008

About to die: How news images move the public

636

2010

Journalism after september 11

618

2011

Tabloid tales: Global debates over media standards

609

2000

Reporting war: Journalism in wartime

417

2004

Why memory's work on journalism does not reflect journalism's work on memory

329

2008

Framing public memory

315

2004

A companion to cultural memory studies

298

2010

On “having been there”:“Eyewitnessing” as a journalistic key word

283

2007

When facts, truth, and reality are God‐terms: on journalism's uneasy place in cultural studies

280

2004

Visual culture and the Holocaust

265

2001

The voice of the visual in memory

208

2004

When war is reduced to a photograph

200

2004

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