Luis  Quintero, PhD

Luis Quintero, PhD

Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Assistant Professor

Expertise: EconomicsInfrastructureFinance

Luis Quintero (PhD in Economics and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University) is an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. His work focuses on urban and real estate economics, especially related to housing markets, agglomeration economies and policy-related issues like housing affordability. He also does research on determinants of growth, decline, and sustainability of cities in developed and developing economies. 

At JHU Carey Business School he teaches courses on infrastructure development of sustainable cities, real estate and infrastructure finance, and microeconomics. He works on policy analysis for the 21st Century Cities Initiative at JHU and is part of the core faculty at the Hopkins Business of Health Initiative. He also co-directs the Latin American and the Caribbean Economics Association (LACEA) urban economics network.

Luis’s work has been published in leading economic journals, and his work has been quoted in the media, including NPR, Fox, The Economist, Baltimore Magazine, The Washington Post, the LA Times, and CNN.

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Research examines the impacts of rent regulation and implications for inequality

Luis Quintero, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, recently conducted a study examining the socioeconomic impacts of rent regulation with colleagues from the University of North Texas and George Washington University.
21-Jul-2022 03:25:11 PM EDT

Breaking Down the Elements of $1 Trillion Infrastructure Bill

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Assistant Professor Luis Quintero, an economist who examines urban growth, housing markets, and infrastructure development, offers his insights into the infrastructure bill in the following Q&A.
10-Aug-2021 09:30:33 AM EDT

Domination of Housing Markets by Few Builders Slows the Industry and Poses Risk to Overall Economy

The growing domination of local homebuilding markets by relatively few firms has slowed the housing industry, posing a risk to the overall American economy, two researchers at Johns Hopkins University demonstrate in a new study.
11-Dec-2018 09:00:40 AM EST

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