American Psychological Association (APA)

APA Statement Regarding Transgender Individuals Serving in Military

Newswise — WASHINGTON -- Following is a statement by Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, regarding President Trump’s placing new limits on transgender individuals serving in the military:  

“The American Psychological Association is alarmed by the administration’s misuse of psychological science to stigmatize transgender Americans and justify limiting their ability to serve in uniform and access medically necessary health care.

“Substantial psychological research shows that gender dysphoria is a treatable condition, and does not, by itself, limit the ability of individuals to function well and excel in their work, including in military service. The science is clear that individuals who are adequately treated for gender dysphoria should not be considered mentally unstable. Additionally, the incidence of gender dysphoria is extremely low.

“No scientific evidence has shown that allowing transgender people to serve in the armed forces has an adverse impact on readiness or unit cohesion. What research does show is that discrimination and stigma undermine morale and readiness by creating a significant source of stress for sexual minorities that can harm their health and well-being.”

APA’s governing Council of Representatives adopted a resolution in 2008 supporting full equality for transgender and gender-variant people and calling for legal and social recognition of transgender individuals.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes nearly 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

 

www.apa.org

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Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Political Polarization: Often Not as Bad as We Think
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

As politics grows increasingly polarized, a new global study finds people often exaggerate political differences and negative feelings of those on the opposite side of the political divide, and this misperception can be reduced by informing them of the other side’s true feelings. The study replicates earlier research in the United States, finding the phenomenon to be generalizable across 25 countries.

Released: 29-Sep-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Experts ready to provide insight on 2020 elections
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: September 29, 2020 | 3:51 pm | SHARE: With the 2020 election cycle in full swing, American voters find themselves with no shortage of issues to consider when deciding which candidate has earned the right to help tackle them. Racial unrest, historic wildfires and a pandemic that’s infected millions and led to 200,000 American deaths are among the factors shaping an electorate that’s polarized like never before.

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Released: 29-Sep-2020 3:50 PM EDT
WashU Expert: Withholding federal funds from ‘anarchist jurisdictions’ violates Constitution
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Department of Justice Sept. 21 issued a list of “anarchist jurisdictions,” pursuant to an order from President Donald Trump to review federal funding for cities where violence or vandalism has occurred adjacent to protests.If the Trump administration withholds federal funds from these jurisdictions based on the “anarchist” designation, that withholding of funds would violate the Constitution in at least two ways, says a Constitutional law expert at Washington University in St.

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Cornell University

Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid “catastrophizing” worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.


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