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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Sep-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 700998

Researchers identify marker in brain associated with aggression in children

University of Iowa

A University of Iowa-led research team has identified a brain-wave marker associated with aggression in young children. The finding could lead to earlier identification of toddlers with aggressive tendencies before the behavior becomes more ingrained in adolescence. Results published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Released:
24-Sep-2018 12:15 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 701097

Racial and Ethnic Bias Leads to Lower Well-Being Among Adolescents

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Racial and ethnic discrimination is problematic for all aspects of development — from mental and physical health to risky behaviors and academic success — particularly for Latinos, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin determined after analyzing findings from hundreds of previous studies on adolescents.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

MeiklePhoto.jpg

Article ID: 701061

Sidestepping the pitfalls of overconfidence with plausible deniability

University of Notre Dame

Although confidence can serve as both a blessing and a curse, new research from the University of Notre Dame shows how people can reap the rewards without risking the social penalties for overconfidence.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 11:20 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 701053

‘Rounding Up’ Beats Traditional Fundraising Requests

North Carolina State University

Research finds asking consumers to "round up" their purchases to the nearest dollar is the best way to solicit donations.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 7:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
27-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
25-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Sep-2018 4:00 AM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 701007

Ethics of lying: When loyalty trumps honesty

Cornell University

Can lying be ethical? Some people seem to think so, especially when it comes to loyalty. A new Cornell University study shows people who are dishonest out of loyalty feel they are acting ethically and morally but outsiders disagree, seeing those action as immoral and wrong – unless they lie out of loyalty.

Released:
24-Sep-2018 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
26-Sep-2018 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
24-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 26-Sep-2018 4:00 PM EDT

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 700977

Take a Step Back From Yourself to Better Realize the Benefits of Awe

University at Buffalo

Religion and nature can both lead to awe, and turning to one or the other is a common coping strategy for the stress. But an awe-inspiring experience can have negative consequences as well as benefits, according to a novel UB-led study that uses cardiovascular responses to stress to take a broad look at awe and the critical role perspective plays when considering the effects of encountering awe.

Released:
24-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    24-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700829

Asian-Americans More Likely to Be Hired to Lead Troubled Companies

American Psychological Association (APA)

WASHINGTON – Asian-Americans are more than twice as likely to be hired as CEOs when a company is struggling, possibly setting them up for failure, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 11:15 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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