Expert Pitch
Tulane University

Impeachment process poses challenges for both parties, Tulane law professor says

10-Dec-2019 3:30 PM EST, by Tulane University

Newswise — Impeachment expert Stephen Griffin, a constitutional law professor at Tulane University School of Law, says the articles of impeachment submitted by Democrats on Tuesday create opportunities and challenges for both parties moving forward.

“The articles of impeachment are arguably the first in American history not to be ultimately grounded in allegations that the president committed a federal crime or other violation of the law,” said Griffin, the W.R. Irby Chair and Rutledge C. Clement Jr. Professor in Constitutional Law.

For Democrats, it means they do not have to worry about whether the established facts satisfy the technicalities of a given crime such as bribery or obstruction of justice, he said. For Republicans, it creates the opportunity to respond by demanding clear criteria for the somewhat abstract offense of the “abuse of power.”

“Democrats have the corresponding challenge of defending their criteria as specific and arguing that (President Trump) is different from past presidents,” Griffin said.

Even if Trump is not ultimately removed from office, the impeachment process gives Republican senators a “genuine chance to caution Trump that his behavior, while not impeachable, is not permissible, especially as the 2020 election draws closer, Griffin said.

“Whether or not they favor removal, they should be put on the record as to whether Trump’s conduct is acceptable in our constitutional democracy,” he said.

Griffin is available for media interviews and can put the legal aspects of impeachment in context for readers and viewers. He can be reached at sgriffin@tulane.edu or by contacting Barri Bronston at bbronst@tulane.edu or 504-314-7444.
 

Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5676
Released: 20-Nov-2020 4:25 PM EST
Those darn property taxes! Insights from Texas tax protests
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

Everyone loves to complain that their taxes are too high. Yet few people actually take the time to formally protest them. A recent deep-dive into property tax appeals in Texas offers new insights on what motivates people to protest or accept their tax obligations.

Newswise: Biden administration vs. COVID-19: U-M experts can discuss
Released: 19-Nov-2020 4:55 PM EST
Biden administration vs. COVID-19: U-M experts can discuss
University of Michigan

University of Michigan epidemiologists are available to discuss the challenges President-elect Joe Biden’s administration will face in combating the coronavirus when he takes the reins in January.To schedule an interview, contact Nardy Baeza Bickel at nbbickel@umich.edu or text 616-550-4531.Emily Toth MartinEmily Toth Martin, associate professor of epidemiology at the U-M School of Public Health, is an infectious disease epidemiologist who has been using COVID-19 public health data to help inform mitigation and policy.

Newswise: NEW: Youth vote up significantly in 2020; young people of color pivotal
Released: 19-Nov-2020 3:40 PM EST
NEW: Youth vote up significantly in 2020; young people of color pivotal
Tufts University

Presidential election turnout among young people ages 18-29 reached 52-55%, significantly higher than the 45-48% turnout of 2016, according to a new youth turnout estimate released today from CIRCLE at Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life.

Newswise: Making the Best Decision: Math Shows Diverse Thinkers Equal Better Results
Released: 16-Nov-2020 2:55 PM EST
Making the Best Decision: Math Shows Diverse Thinkers Equal Better Results
Florida State University

A Florida State University researcher published a new study today that tackles how groups make decisions and the dynamics that make for fast and accurate decision making. He found that networks that consisted of both impulsive and deliberate individuals made, on average, quicker and better decisions than a group with homogenous thinkers.

Released: 16-Nov-2020 2:05 PM EST
Amid New COVID-19 Surge, PPE Must Be Top Priority Says Critical Care Societies Collaborative
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

In response to the reports of COVID-19 surges around the country, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative, comprising the American Association of Critical‐Care Nurses, American College of Chest Physicians, the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine, released the following statement:


Showing results

110 of 5676

close
2.09309