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Article ID: 709771

Ultrasound Provides Precise, Minimally Invasive Way to Measure Heart Function in Children

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure heart function performed with similar precision to a traditional highly invasive device.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709769

A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease

University of Central Florida

After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 709768

Have sleep apnea? Using your CPAP device consistently may slow memory loss

American Geriatrics Society

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) refers to having problems with your memory and decision-making abilities.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709767

Researchers discover new material to help power electronics

Ohio State University

A research team at The Ohio State University has discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons—using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary. The team published its findings today March 18 in the journal Nature Materials.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709762

Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

University of Georgia

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study led by the University of Georgia Infectious Diseases Laboratory and funded by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709763

Trembling Aspen Leaves Could Save Future Mars Rovers

University of Warwick

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 709766

Scientists identify compounds in coffee which may inhibit prostate cancer

European Association of Urology

For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer. This is a pilot study, carried out on drug-resistant cancer cells in cell culture and in a mouse model;

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 709586

Fertility App “Dot” Found to be As Effective As Other Family Planning Methods

Georgetown University Medical Center

Results of a first-of-its-kind prospective study with a family planning app find it to be as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy, according to Georgetown researchers.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 3:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709759

Supercrystal: A Hidden Phase of Matter Created by a Burst of Light

Penn State Materials Research Institute

“Frustration” plus a pulse of laser light resulted in a stable “supercrystal” created by a team of researchers led by Penn State and Argonne National Laboratory, together with University of California, Berkeley, and two other national labs.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709756

Google Research Shows How AI Can Make Ophthalmologists More Effective

American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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