Sam Handwerger, CPA, is a full-time Lecturer in the department, and is a University of Maryland undergraduate accounting alumnus. He also holds a Master of Science in Taxation degree from the University of Baltimore. Handwerger was a Senior Tax Researcher with EY in New York City and later led the Tax Planning and Preparation Departments of the CPA firm Handwerger, Cardegna, Funkhouser & Lurman. In 1996, he was awarded the Governor’s Volunteer of the year award in the State of Maryland for financial and management advisement to non-profit organizations. Before joining the Smith School on a full-time basis, Handwerger held adjunct positions at the Johns Hopkins University School of Business and the University of Baltimore Law School.

Handwerger's professional accomplishments includes giving professional expert testimony in various legal cases involving accounting and tax issues as well as for the now landmark decision in Maryland Tax Court, Har Sinai West v. Comptroller. Further, in 2013 Handwerger orchestrated a "no-change" IRS audit in Tax Court involving a $30.0 million assessment, Docket 28353-12.

No Research/Citations

Senator Tim Scott's claim that the IRS will monitor private bank accounts is not accurate

Based on the last version of the Biden plan, Tim Scott's comments were not entirely accurate. The only accounts that would be subject to the reporting requirement would be where the total deposits exceed $10,000 after taking out of the equation W-2 wages and government benefits, e.g., social security payments.
28-Oct-2021 04:50:41 PM EDT

The 280E Tax Code as an Obstacle for Cannabis Firms and the SAFE Banking Act

The SAFE Banking Act was a big step toward removing barriers for cannabis businesses. But Maryland Smith accounting expert and CPA Samuel Handwerger says other obstacles loom. Among them, the tax code.
25-May-2021 12:25:07 PM EDT

How Tesla’s Bitcoin Play Fits Into Cryptocurrency Taxation

Maryland Smith tax expert Samuel Handwerger starts with Elon Musk’s stake in virtual currency and explores the implications for the future of finance – and the IRS.
18-Feb-2021 01:15:15 PM EST

"The problem begins when the IRS tries to be accommodating to university accounting systems. Those systems invariably record tuition as it is charged as opposed to when paid."

- https://www.rhsmith.umd.edu/news/quirk-irss-tuition-reporting-rules

Available for logged-in users onlyLogin HereorRegister
close
0.0781