AAES Honors Outstanding Engineers and Reporting

Article ID: 18706

Released: 6-May-2000 12:00 AM EDT

Source Newsroom: American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES)

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THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ENGINEERING SOCIETIES
1111 19th St., N.W.
Suite 403
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 296-2237; Fax (202) 296-1151

Date: May 4, 2000
Contact: Charles Blue, Director of Communications
(202) 296-2237 x16; cblue@aaes.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

AAES Honors Outstanding Engineers and Recognizes Top Engineering Reporting

WASHINGTON - The American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES) will honor some of the most visionary and recognized leaders of the U.S. engineering community at the AAES' 21st Annual Awards Ceremony and Banquet, which will be held May 8 in the Great Hall of the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C.

W. Wayne Allen, past chairman of the board, Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, Okla., will receive the AAES Chair's Award. Allen is credited "with the capacity to create opportunities in commerce and industry, the foresight to expand on engineering achievements so important to the global economy, and the willingness to demonstrate the promise of an environmentally sound approach to energy resources." He also is honored "for his distinguished service to the engineering profession worldwide, for advancing the goals of engineering societies throughout thirty-eight years of bold leadership of Phillips Petroleum Company, and for his commitment to youth education and the professional development of engineers."

Established in 1980, the Chair's Award is presented to those distinguished Americans whose leadership and dedication to the engineering community have significantly contributed to the advancement of the engineering profession in the United States. The award consists of a hand-engraved scroll.

Theodore W. Hissey Jr., executive consultant, KEMA Consulting, Horsham, Pa., will be the recipient of the Kenneth Andrew Roe Award. He is honored "for his half-century of dedication to promoting cooperation, understanding and unity among engineering societies located in the U.S. and for his outstanding and creative leadership in advancing the diverse goals of the engineering profession through his role as president of the United Engineering Trustees/United Engineering Foundation."

The Roe Award was established in 1986 to honor Kenneth Andrew Roe, the founding chair of the AAES. It is given to recognize leadership and dedication to unity within the engineering community. The award consists of a hand-engraved scroll and a $3,500 honorarium.

Receiving the National Engineering Award will be Duncan T. Moore, associate director of technology, Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House. Moore will be recognized "for his multiple contributions in education, industry, and government. His leadership of Rochester University's Institute of Optics includes an impressive legacy of graduates whom he has personally mentored." Moore is also recognized for his technical contributions to gradient index optics and the optics industry, which continue to reap benefits for a broad spectrum of mankind.

The National Engineering Award was established by the AAES in 1979. It is presented on behalf of the engineering profession to those engineers whose leadership and accomplishments have particularly benefited humanity.

Former astronaut and current chairman of AIL Systems Inc. Neil Armstrong will be awarded the Norm Augustine Award for Outstanding Achievement in Engineering Communications. This award is presented annually to an engineer who has demonstrated the capacity for communicating the excitement and wonder of engineering. Though Mr. Armstrong is unable to attend the event, Norman Augustine, for whom the award is named, will accept it in his honor.

In conjunction with the annual awards program, the AAES and the United Engineering Foundation will jointly present the Engineering Journalism Award to recognize outstanding reporting of an event or issue that furthers the public understanding of engineering. Joel Achenbach of The Washington Post will receive the award for his article "The Jet Age."

Also, an award of Special Recognition will be presented to John Rennie of Scientific American for their special issue entitled Extreme Engineering.

The National Audubon Society also will present their Joan Hodges Queneau Palladium Medal to Stuart J. Appelbaum and The Restudy Team. The Palladium Medal honors outstanding engineering achievement in environmental conservation.

The American Association of Engineering Societies is a federation of engineering societies dedicated to advancing the knowledge, understanding, and practice of engineering whose membership represents more than one million engineers in the United States.

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