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Article ID: 699251

Improving Nuclear Detection with New Chip Power

Washington University in St. Louis

A cross-disciplinary team of chemists and physicists from Washington University in St. Louis is building a better computer chip to improve detection and surveillance for the illegal transport of nuclear materials at U.S. borders. The work is part of a new, five-year, $10 million collaboration in low-energy nuclear science led by Texas A&M University.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699246

Progress Toward Plugging an Antibiotic Pump

Sandia National Laboratories

Using computer modeling, researchers from Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are helping to develop the means to prevent some deaths from infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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20-Aug-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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    20-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699156

Genomes of Ape Parasites Reveal Origin and Evolution of Leading Cause of Malaria Outside of Africa

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The genome sequences of ape parasites related to Plasmodium vivax, the main source of mosquito-borne malaria outside Africa, provide insights on the origin and early evolution of the human parasite. This finding could have implications for better comprehending and eradicating malaria infection worldwide.

Released:
17-Aug-2018 11:30 AM EDT
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    20-Aug-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699030

Archaeologists Reveal Massive Monumental Cemetery Built by Eastern Africa’s Earliest Herders Near Lake Turkana, Kenya

Stony Brook University

A groundbreaking study has found the earliest and largest monumental cemetery in eastern Africa built 5,000 years ago by early pastoralists living around Lake Turkana, Kenya. This group is believed to have lived without major inequalities and hierarchies, contradicting long-standing narratives about the origins of early civilizations. The study, led by Elisabeth Hildebrand, PhD, Department of Anthropology at Stony Brook University, will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 12:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699226

Laughing Gas May Have Helped Warm Early Earth and Given Breath to Life

Georgia Institute of Technology

Laughing gas and the mystery of Carl Sagan's Faint Young Sun Paradox: When the sun shone dimmer an eon ago, Earth remained warm in spite of it likely thanks to a mix of greenhouse gases. Biogeochemists have now shown how N20, known today for its use as a dental anesthetic, may have made it into the mix.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699229

DHS Awards Virginia Company $200K to Begin Automated Machine Learning Prototype Test

Homeland Security's Science & Technology Directorate

The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate announced that DataRobot, Inc. of Tysons Corner, Virginia has received $200,000 to begin testing a prototype of a machine learning platform for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Global Travel Assessment System.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 699221

Newly launched TRACER center offers enhanced dating and tracer capabilities

Argonne National Laboratory

A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held August 17 to formally open the Argonne TRACER Center (Trace Radioisotope Analysis Center) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory. The TRACER Center provides a new, permanent home for the nation’s only laser-based krypton atom-counting machine.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 699222

Changing How Buildings Are Made

Washington University in St. Louis

Kinga Pabjan, a master’s candidate in architecture and construction management at Washington University in St. Louis, discusses how 3D printing could impact sustainable design.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Arts and Humanities

Article ID: 699149

Coriell Institute for Medical Research Expands Executive Leadership and Announces Promotions

Coriell Institute for Medical Research

Coriell Institute for Medical Research today announced the promotion of two of its scientists to new leadership roles. Alissa Resch, PhD, is now the Institute’s Chief Scientific Officer and Nahid Turan, PhD, is now Chief Laboratory Officer. Drs. Resch and Turan previously served as Director of Biobanking Operations and Director of Laboratory Operations, respectively.

Released:
20-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT
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    20-Aug-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 699151

Scientists Discover Intricacies of Serotonin Receptor Crucial for Better Therapeutics

University of North Carolina Health Care System

Scientists discovered why some drugs activate serotonin receptor 5-HT2B to cause serious heart problems while other very similar drugs don’t. This research, led by UNC School of Medicine scientists, provides drug developers with insights that should help them create safer more effective drugs.

Released:
17-Aug-2018 11:15 AM EDT
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