Newswise — U.S. regulators just announced that they have approved a plan to demolish four dams on the lower Klamath River and open up hundreds of miles of salmon habitat that would be the largest dam removal and river restoration project in the world when it goes forward. 

University of Oregon law professor Adell L. Amos has deep experience and expertise on the Klamath Basin and on dam removal more generally. 

ABOUT ADELL L. AMOS

Amos served in the Obama Administration as the Deputy Solicitor for Land and Water Resources at the U.S. Department of the Interior. She oversaw legal and policy issues involving the nation’s water resources and public lands. She worked directly on water resilience and planning, wilderness policy, the National Landscape Conservation System, renewable energy and its associated water footprint, low-impact hydropower, dam removal efforts including the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, the America’s Great Outdoors Initiative, and many others. Her research emphasizes the jurisdictional governance structures that are deployed for water resources management in the United States and internationally. She focuses on the relationship between federal and state governments on water resource management, the role of administrative agencies in setting national, state, and local water policy, the role of law in developing water policy and responding to change, and the impact of stakeholder participation in water resource decision-making. She is currently working on a multi-year project which focuses on the integration of law and policy into hydrologic and socioeconomic modeling for the Willamette River Basin through a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary effort funded by the NOAA and the National Science Foundation. Amos holds the Clayton R. Hess Professorship and serves as the Executive Director for the Environment Initiative at the UO. She teaches regularly in the nationally ranked Environmental and Natural Resources Law Program, including courses in Water Law, Federal Administrative Law, Environmental Conflict Resolution, and Oregon Water Law and Policy. Her teaching and scholarship have been recognized by the UO Fund for Faculty Excellence and the Hollis Teaching Awards.