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Newswise: How does the atmosphere quench its thirst? Two NAU scientists look to isotopes for answers.

Article ID: 715034

How does the atmosphere quench its thirst? Two NAU scientists look to isotopes for answers.

Northern Arizona University

Kimberly Samuels-Crow is leading a collaborative effort to separate the effects of evaporation and transpiration, which are increasingly a factor in water loss as the climate gets both hotter and drier.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 5:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714851

Honeybees Infect Wild Bumblebees—Through Shared Flowers

University of Vermont

Viruses in managed honeybees are spilling over to wild bumblebee populations though the shared use of flowers, a first-of-its-kind study reveals. This research suggests commercial apiaries may need to be kept away from areas where there are vulnerable native pollinator species, like the endangered rusty patched bumblebee.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 4:40 PM EDT
Newswise: Trees Consider the Climate When Choosing Their Partners

Article ID: 714909

Trees Consider the Climate When Choosing Their Partners

Department of Energy, Office of Science

ees can establish several types of symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria. Researchers constructed a global map of the types of tree symbioses across the world. With the map, they determined that the type of fungal symbiosis found in trees depends on how quickly the organic matter in the soil decomposes. The team also found that bacteria that convert nitrogen gas from the atmosphere into plant-usable products form tree symbioses in arid environments.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
2-Jul-2019 1:15 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
26-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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Newswise: First Snapshots of Trapped CO2 Molecules Shed New Light on Carbon Capture
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714843

First Snapshots of Trapped CO2 Molecules Shed New Light on Carbon Capture

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Scientists from the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have taken the first images of carbon dioxide molecules within a molecular cage ¬¬– part of a highly porous nanoparticle known as a MOF, or metal-organic framework, with great potential for separating and storing gases and liquids.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 4:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 204646_web.jpg

Article ID: 714984

Researchers discover more than 50 lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet

Lancaster University

Researchers have discovered 56 previously uncharted subglacial lakes beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet bringing the total known number of lakes to 60.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists Announces 2019 National Laureates

Article ID: 714714

Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists Announces 2019 National Laureates

Blavatnik Family Foundation/New York Academy of Sciences

Three female scientists have been named Laureates of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists, each receiving $250,000, the largest unrestricted scientific prize offered to America’s most-promising, faculty-level scientific researchers. It marks the first time in the program’s 13-year history that all of the recipients are women.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: New Unprinting Method Can Help Recycle Paper and Curb Environmental Costs

Article ID: 714887

New Unprinting Method Can Help Recycle Paper and Curb Environmental Costs

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Imagine if your printer had an “unprint” button that used pulses of light to remove toner, curbing environmental impacts compared with conventional paper recycling. A Rutgers-led team has created a new way to unprint paper that, unlike laser-based methods, can work with the standard, coated paper used in home and office printers. The new method uses pulses of light from a xenon lamp, and can erase black, blue, red and green toners without damaging the paper, according to a study in the Journal of Cleaner Production.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 8:50 AM EDT

Article ID: 714952

Department of Energy Announces $13 Million for Atmospheric Research

Department of Energy, Office of Science

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $13 million in funding for 27 projects in atmospheric sciences in an effort to improve models for predicting weather and climate.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 5:35 PM EDT

Article ID: 714904

Study Uses Supercomputers to Advance Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Models

University of California San Diego

Multi-fault earthquakes can span fault systems of tens to hundreds of kilometers, with ruptures propagating from one segment to another. During the last decade, seismologists have observed several cases of this complicated type of earthquake rupture, and are now relying on supercomputers to provide detailed models to better understand the fundamental physical processes that take place during these events, which can have far reaching effects.

Released:
25-Jun-2019 4:25 PM EDT

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