Trends In Engineering Research


Contact: Anne Buckley 212-705-8157 buckelya@asme.org
Press Room, Rm. 208 George R. Brown Convention Ctr.

PRESIDENT OF ASME INTERNATIONAL DISCUSSES TRENDS IN ENGINEERING RESEARCH Keynote Address Energy Week å97 Houston, Texas Jan. 28, 1997

Houston, Jan. 28, 1997 -- Today at Energy Week π97, in Houston, Dr. Richard J. Goldstein, president of ASME International, posited how government and industry ≥can radically alter the status quo and influence the worldπs future.≤

In his speech, ≥Engineers Respond to the Call,≤ Dr. Goldstein discussed the impact downsizing and rightsizing in industry and cost-cutting in federal research and development (R&D) is having on engineering technology. He urged the audience ≥to reflect on the ramifications≤ of these trends as they relate to fundamental engineering research.

Based upon the industrial and governmental trends in R&D, he questioned the ability of todayπs students and todayπs practicing engineers to meet tomorrowπs engineering needs and to anticipate and contribute to tomorrowπs technology.

≥In the current political climate, funding for fundamental engineering research is in jeopardy,≤ said Dr. Goldstein. He explained that this is due, in part, to peopleπs misperceptions that only scientists perform fundamental research, commonly referred to as basic research. He urged engineers to act, to ≥sound the alarm,≤ to move to ≥strengthen the governmentπs efforts in fundamental engineering and science research.≤

According to Dr. Goldstein, ≥Supporting engineering research promotes and ensures that innovative technologies and new avenues of engineering practice will surface and thrive.≤ He concluded by noting that by supporting fundamental engineering research, in all spheres, academia, federal agencies and industrial laboratories, todayπs engineers and engineering students will meet the ≥demands of the highly competitive international marketplace.≤

Dr. Goldstein earned his undergraduate degree at Cornell University and did his graduate studies at the University of Minnesota where he is currently Regentsπ and James J. Ryan Professor and Head of the Mechanical Engineering Department.

A pioneer in a number of areas relating to fluid mechanics and heat transfer, Dr. Goldstein paved the way for studies in transient and steady convection in fluids. His experimental methods proved particularly significant regarding laser applications in interferometry and laser Doppler velocimetry.

An honorary member of ASME International, Dr. Goldstein holds honorary doctorates from the Tecnion, Israel Institute of Technology, and the Instituto Superior Tecnico of Portugal.

Dr. Richard J. Goldstein delivered this address at Energy Week π97 in Houston, Texas, in the George R. Brown Convention Center, Tues., Jan. 28.

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