Association for Molecular Pathology Calls on Senate to Close Coverage Gaps for Clinical Laboratory Testing in Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Drafting error in bill threatens the government’s commitment to provide free testing for all Americans
16-Mar-2020 9:00 AM EDT, by Association for Molecular Pathology

Newswise — ROCKVILLE, Md. – March 16, 2020 – The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, molecular diagnostic professional society, today released a statement on H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, as passed by the House of Representatives on March 14, 2020. The following statement is attributable to Mary Steele Williams, Executive Director of the Association for Molecular Pathology.

“While we are deeply appreciative that Congress wants to ensure that all tests will be covered by insurers and free of charge, AMP is concerned that H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, fails to provide adequate coverage for all patients. Our members have been working tirelessly on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic for weeks to develop, validate and administer COVID-19 laboratory developed testing procedures (LDPs). We are concerned that a drafting error in the bill will leave thousands of patients without insurance coverage for tests that are being offered by private laboratories, including many academic medical centers, reference laboratories and community health systems across the country. As of now, H.R. 6201 only provides coverage at no cost sharing for tests that have received emergency use authorization (EUA) by the FDA. This leaves a significant coverage gap for all of the tests awaiting this authorization. If not remedied, the restrictive language will ultimately limit the tests being covered, resulting in many patients likely receiving surprise bills or not seeking testing at all. AMP now calls on the Senate to make these changes and follow through on Congress’ commitment to provide free testing for ALL Americans.”

Throughout this crisis, AMP has provided free resources and frequent updates to inform the healthcare community about ongoing developments and support members who are engaging in coronavirus testing. Our online resource center is updated frequently and our webinar on what laboratories need to know remains freely accessible.

 

ABOUT AMP

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) was founded in 1995 to provide structure and leadership to the emerging field of molecular diagnostics. AMP's 2,500+ members practice various disciplines of molecular diagnostics, including bioinformatics, infectious diseases, inherited conditions, and oncology. Our members are pathologists, clinical laboratory directors, basic and translational scientists, technologists, and trainees that practice in a variety of settings, including academic and community medical centers, government, and industry.

Through the efforts of its Board of Directors, Committees, Working Groups, and Members, AMP is the primary resource for expertise, education, and collaboration in one of the fastest growing fields in healthcare. AMP members influence policy and regulation on the national and international levels, ultimately serving to advance innovation in the field and protect patient access to high quality, appropriate testing. For more information, visit www.amp.org and follow AMP on Twitter: @AMPath.

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Andrew Noble

anoble@amp.org

415-722-2129




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