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Research Results
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Think all BPA-free products are safe? Not so fast, scientists warn

University of Missouri, Columbia

Using "BPA-free" plastic products could be as harmful to human health -- including a developing brain -- as those products that contain the controversial chemical, suggest scientists in a new study led by the University of Missouri and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Health, Food and Water Safety, Food Science, Neuro, OBGYN, Personalized Medicine, Public Health,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 11:15 AM EST
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Released:
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2020 6:30 PM EST
Released:
14-Feb-2020 9:20 AM EST
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Embargo will expire:
21-Feb-2020 12:15 AM EST
Released to reporters:
18-Feb-2020 4:00 PM EST

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Research Results
Newswise: UCI researchers reveal how low oxygen levels in the heart predispose people to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias

UCI researchers reveal how low oxygen levels in the heart predispose people to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias

University of California, Irvine

Low oxygen levels in the heart have long been known to produce life-threatening arrhythmias, even sudden death. Until now, it was not clear how. New findings, in a study led by Steve A. N. Goldstein, MD, PhD, vice chancellor for Health Affairs at the University of California, Irvine, and distinguished professor in the UCI School of Medicine Departments of Pediatrics and Physiology & Biophysics, reveal the underlying mechanism for this dangerous heart disorder.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Children's Health, Heart Disease, Public Health, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
18-Feb-2020 3:30 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Why Zika virus caused most harmful brain damage to Brazilian newborns

Why Zika virus caused most harmful brain damage to Brazilian newborns

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that the strain of Zika that circulated in Brazil during the microcephaly epidemic that began in 2015 was particularly damaging to the developing brain.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Neuro, OBGYN, Public Health, Zika Virus, South America News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
18-Feb-2020 3:25 PM EST
Research Results
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Mayo researchers create, test AI to improve EKG testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Mayo Clinic

An approach based on artificial intelligence (AI) may allow EKGs to be used to screen for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the future. With hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart walls become thick and may interfere with the heart's ability to function properly. The disease also predisposes some patients to potentially fatal abnormal rhythms. Current EKG technology has limited diagnostic yield for this disease.

Channels: All Journal News, Artificial Intelligence, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Public Health,

Released:
18-Feb-2020 12:30 PM EST
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