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Newswise: 1 in 3 Parents Plan to Skip Flu Shots for Their Kids During COVID-19 Pandemic
22-Sep-2020 2:00 PM EDT
1 in 3 Parents Plan to Skip Flu Shots for Their Kids During COVID-19 Pandemic
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Just a third of parents believe that having their child get the flu vaccine is more important this year than previous years, a national poll suggests.

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Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT

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Newswise: Last-resort life support option helped majority of critically ill COVID-19 patients survive, global study shows
24-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Last-resort life support option helped majority of critically ill COVID-19 patients survive, global study shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it. Patients in a new international study faced a staggeringly high risk of death, as ventilators failed to support their lungs. But after they were placed on ECMO, their actual death rate was less than 40%.

Newswise:Video Embedded could-a-tiny-fish-hold-the-key-to-curing-blindness
VIDEO
Released: 25-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Could a tiny fish hold the key to curing blindness?
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Imagine this: A patient learns that they are losing their sight because an eye disease has damaged crucial cells in their retina. Then, under the care of their doctor, they simply grow some new retinal cells, restoring their vision. Although science hasn’t yet delivered this happy ending, researchers are working on it – with help from the humble zebrafish. When a zebrafish loses its retinal cells, it grows new ones. This observation has encouraged scientists to try hacking the zebrafish’s innate regenerative capacity to learn how to treat human disease. That is why among the National Eye Institute’s 1,200 active research projects, nearly 80 incorporate zebrafish.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Case Western Reserve University researchers to examine how COVID-19 ravaged America’s nursing homes
Case Western Reserve University

Within a few months, federal officials reported that one of every five nursing homes had experienced a death from the novel coronavirus. Not long after, several media outlets published independent analysis finding that an estimated 40% of the fatalities related to COVID-19 took place in nursing homes. Rather than surrender to the terrifying trend, Case Western Reserve researchers saw an opportunity to help.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Interdisciplinary team wins grant to speed oral cancer testing
Case Western Reserve University

Mouth lesions are among the main early indicators of oral cancer, but determining whether a sore is actually malignant typically involves painful, costly biopsies. Case Western Reserve researchers think they have a better idea—and the National Institutes of Health has given them $420,000 to advance it.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:55 PM EDT
ASA Applauds White House Effort to End Surprise Medical Bills
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) applauds yesterday’s announcement of an Executive Order by the president to address surprise medical bills. ASA has been committed to ongoing efforts to protect patients while finding a fair solution to addressing these unexpected medical bills.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Team assessing if dual-antibody injection prevents COVID-19 illness
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A combination antibody treatment for preventing COVID-19 illness in individuals who have had sustained exposure to someone with the virus is being studied by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The clinical trial is enrolling patients at Harris Health System’s Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital.

Newswise: 2020 Tom Isaacs Award honors leading Parkinson’s expert
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:45 PM EDT
2020 Tom Isaacs Award honors leading Parkinson’s expert
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Sept. 25, 2020) — Van Andel Institute and The Cure Parkinson’s Trust are thrilled to announce Caroline Tanner, M.D., Ph.D., of University of California, San Francisco’s Weill Institute for Neurosciences as the recipient of the 2020 Tom Isaacs Award, which honors individuals who have had a significant impact on the lives of people with Parkinson’s and/or involved them in a participatory way in research.

Newswise: Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 1:35 PM EDT
The male Y chromosome does more than we thought
University of Montreal

New light is being shed on a little-known role of Y chromosome genes, specific to males, that could explain why men suffer differently than women from various diseases, including Covid-19.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:40 PM EDT
ASU Researchers Receive $6m State Contract to Develop Rapid, 20-Minute Covid-19 Saliva Test
Arizona State University (ASU)

As the world manages through the coronavirus pandemic, Arizona State University continues its work to discover and develop easier and more widespread COVID-19 testing to assist in managing the virus.

Newswise: NYU College of Dentistry Awarded NIH Grant to Investigate Endosomal Receptors as Targets for Chronic Pain Treatment
Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
NYU College of Dentistry Awarded NIH Grant to Investigate Endosomal Receptors as Targets for Chronic Pain Treatment
New York University

The NIH has awarded NYU College of Dentistry researchers Nigel Bunnett, PhD, and Brian Schmidt, DDS, MD, PhD, a $3.9 million grant to study targeting endosomal receptors for the treatment of chronic pain. The five-year grant will support Bunnett and Schmidt’s collaborative research, which aims to ultimately yield improved pain management without the need for opioids.

Newswise: 244080_web.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Potential drug target for dangerous E. coli infections identified
University of New South Wales

Escherichia coli, known as E. coli, are bacteria which many people associate with causing mild food poisoning, but some types of E. coli can be fatal.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Tattoos Impair Sweating, Could Increase Risk of Heat-related Injury
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research finds that tattooed skin does not sweat as much as non-inked areas of the body, which may have implications for the body’s ability to cool in people with extensive tattooing.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Appoints Janice Bowie as New Bloomberg Centennial Professor
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed Janice Bowie, PhD, MPH, as a Bloomberg Centennial Professor.

Newswise: Scientists Train Computers to Recognize Which Early Stage Breast Cancers Will Spread
Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Train Computers to Recognize Which Early Stage Breast Cancers Will Spread
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new, machine-learning based approach could help doctors to separate aggressive stage 0 breast cancer from non-aggressive forms, sparing some women unnecessary mastectomies.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Scott, Warner introduce legislation to increase access for diabetes care
Endocrine Society

Today, U.S. Senators Tim Scott (R-SC), Mark Warner (D-VA), Kevin Cramer (R-ND), Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), Tom Cotton (R-AR), and Tina Smith (D-MN) introduced the PREVENT DIABETES Act. This legislation would increase access to the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) Expanded Model by allowing CDC-recognized virtual suppliers to participate in the program.

Newswise: World Lung Day 2020: Respiratory Groups Call for Research to Prevent, Detect and Treat Respiratory Infections
Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:45 AM EDT
World Lung Day 2020: Respiratory Groups Call for Research to Prevent, Detect and Treat Respiratory Infections
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Today, on World Lung Day (WLD), the American Thoracic Society is united with members of the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) and WLD partner organizations to advocate for respiratory health globally and call for more research to prevent, detect and treat respiratory infections.

Newswise: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease
Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Understanding Sickle Cell Disease
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Sickle cell disease is a lifelong inherited disorder of the red blood cells that poses many challenges for the people and families living with it. Rutgers Cancer Institute expert shares more on the basics of sickle cell disease and how the illness is managed.

Newswise: Diaphragm Pacing can Enhance Recovery and
Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery, Small Series Concludes
Released: 25-Sep-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Diaphragm Pacing can Enhance Recovery and Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery, Small Series Concludes
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Surgeons at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have improved the prognosis of several cardiac patients after emergency FDA approval of a diaphragm pacing device.

Newswise: Beaumont researcher leads international team studying link between post-operative delirium and later onset of dementia
Released: 25-Sep-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Beaumont researcher leads international team studying link between post-operative delirium and later onset of dementia
Beaumont Health

A collaborative team of researchers from the United Kingdom and the Beaumont Research Institute in Royal Oak, Michigan have been awarded more than $1.67 million by the National Institute on Aging, a division of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, to study the link between dementia and post-operative delirium.

Newswise: Remote Neuropsychology Tests For Children Shown Effective
Released: 25-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Remote Neuropsychology Tests For Children Shown Effective
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Sept. 23, 2020 – Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children’s Health indicates. The finding, published online this month in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, could help expand access to specialists and reduce barriers to care, particularly as the popularity of telemedicine grows during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: New study finds Biden, Trump both likely to be ‘Super-Agers’
24-Sep-2020 11:40 AM EDT
New study finds Biden, Trump both likely to be ‘Super-Agers’
University of Illinois at Chicago

In a paper published in the Journal on Active Aging researchers conclude that both 2020 presidential candidates — former Vice President Joe Biden, 77, and President Donald Trump, 74 — are likely to maintain their health beyond the end of the next presidential term. As a result, they say that chronological age and fitness should not be factors in the 2020 election.

Newswise: Historical Racial & Ethnic Health Inequities Account for Disproportionate COVID-19 Impact
22-Sep-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Historical Racial & Ethnic Health Inequities Account for Disproportionate COVID-19 Impact
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

A new Viewpoint piece published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the ways in which COVID-19 disproportionately impacts historically disadvantaged communities of color in the United States, and how baseline inequalities in our health system are amplified by the pandemic. The authors also discuss potential solutions.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 28-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 24-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Un estudio demuestra que los pacientes que se sometieron a un trasplante pulmonar y no recibieron medicamento antimicótico preventivo corren mayor riesgo de muerte
Mayo Clinic

Según una investigación de Mayo Clinic en la que participaron 667 pacientes que recibieron trasplante pulmonar entre el 2005 y el 2018, los medicamentos antimicóticos preventivos reducen a la mitad el riesgo de mortalidad en el primer año luego del trasplante de pulmón.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
In-person college instruction leading to thousands of COVID-19 cases per day in US
University of Washington

Reopening university and college campuses with primarily in-person instruction is associated with a significant increase in cases of COVID-19 in the counties where the schools are located.

18-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Researchers Set the Stage to Improve the Efficiency of Living Kidney Donor Evaluations
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Certain indicators may be used to monitor and improve the performance of transplant centers in how efficiently they evaluate individuals interested in becoming living kidney donors.

Newswise: Yale Cancer Center Awarded NIH SPORE for Head and Neck Cancer Research
Released: 24-Sep-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Yale Cancer Center Awarded NIH SPORE for Head and Neck Cancer Research
Yale Cancer Center

Yale Cancer Center researchers were awarded a five-year, $11.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund the Yale Head and Neck Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Physicians issue warning about rare neurological condition, expected to appear this fall
University of Chicago Medical Center

Pediatricians Henry David, MD, and Madan Kumar, DO, of the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital warn parents of young children to watch out for symptoms of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), a rare neurological disorder linked to viral infections that can lead to permanent paralysis.

Newswise: A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
Released: 24-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.

Newswise: Some Severe COVID-19 Cases Linked to Genetic Mutations or Antibodies that Attack the Body
Released: 24-Sep-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Some Severe COVID-19 Cases Linked to Genetic Mutations or Antibodies that Attack the Body
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Two new studies offer an explanation for why COVID-19 cases can be so variable. A subset of patients has mutations in key immunity genes; other patients have auto-antibodies that target the same components of the immune system. Both circumstances could contribute to severe forms of the disease.


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