American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Executive Order Mandating How to Address Race and Diversity: ATS Responds

Newswise — Sept. 28, 2020 – Today, the leadership of the American Thoracic Society issued the following statement in response to the recent executive order by the Trump Administration:

On Sept. 22 the President signed an executive order titled “Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping”, which seeks to censor federal agency education efforts to address racial inequality in America. The executive order prevents the discussion of “divisive concepts” such as “race or scapegoating”, “race or sex stereotyping” or that “an individual, by virtue of his or her race or sex, bears responsibility for actions committed in the past by other members of the same race or sex.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has provided further and clear-cut evidence of the impact of longstanding racial and ethnic disparities on respiratory health.  These inequities, together with recent public protests, argue for more -not less- education and discussion about race and diversity.

As a medical society of clinicians, scientists, and related health care professionals, we recognize that diversity, not just as related to race, ethnicity, and gender but also to differences in opinions and backgrounds, is essential to scientific advances and progress.  The recent actions by the current administration seek to move America backwards in this regard.

Diversity makes us stronger and more successful. The scientific and medical communities have produced innumerable examples of this. This is a fact and not a theory. Our focus now and in the future must be on understanding our history, expanding opportunities for all, and celebrating our diversity. Only then can we reach our fullest potential.

 

Share Via Twitter @atscommunity leadership responds to executive executive order mandating how to address #race and #diversity.

 

 

About the American Thoracic Society

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society’s 15,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy. The ATS publishes three journals, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, the Annals of the American Thoracic Society and ATS Scholar.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3837
Newswise: Models show how COVID-19 cuts a neighborhood path
Released: 29-Oct-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Models show how COVID-19 cuts a neighborhood path
University of Washington

A research team led by UC Irvine and the University of Washington has created a new model of how the coronavirus can spread through a community. The model factors in network exposure — whom one interacts with — and demographics to simulate at a more detailed level both where and how quickly the coronavirus could spread through Seattle and 18 other major cities.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Lung scans for stroke patients could provide earlier COVID-19 detection
American Heart Association (AHA)

Computed tomography angiogram (CTA) scans may offer fast and early detection of COVID-19 in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients, according to new research published today in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Contrary to the viral rumors on social media, Dr. Fauci did not write a paper on how masks caused mass deaths in the 1918 flu pandemic
Newswise

Posts are being shared on social media attempting to negate the use of masks as protective devices during the pandemic. These claims are false. Fauci did not blame mask use for any deaths that occurred during the 1918 Spanish flu.

Newswise: How Does the Environment Impact COVID-19?
Released: 29-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
How Does the Environment Impact COVID-19?
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

S&T NBACC research finds that sunlight is the strongest environmental factor that inactivates COVID-19.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 1:25 PM EDT
The Lancet Healthy Longevity: Residential context important factor in risk of COVID-19 mortality among older adults, Stockholm study suggests
Lancet

New study of older adults (aged 70 or over) in Stockholm, Sweden, suggests older people living in care homes had higher COVID-19 mortality risk than those living in single houses or apartment buildings.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Study measures effectiveness of different face mask materials when coughing
University of Cambridge

A team of researchers have tested everything from t-shirts and socks to jeans and vacuum bags to determine what type of mask material is most effective at trapping the ultrafine particles which may contain viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Hide and seek: Understanding how COVID-19 evades detection in a human cell
Released: 29-Oct-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Hide and seek: Understanding how COVID-19 evades detection in a human cell
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists using the Advanced Photon Source have discovered new insights into the ways the SARS-CoV-2 virus camouflages itself inside the human body.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Two million lost health coverage, thousands died prematurely in Trump's first 3 years
Physicians For A National Health Program

A new analysis of federal surveys on health insurance coverage concludes that the number of uninsured Americans increased by about 2.3 million between 2016 and 2019.

Released: 29-Oct-2020 12:05 PM EDT
How people would choose who gets scarce COVID-19 treatment
Ohio State University

As COVID-19 cases begin climbing again in the United States, the possibility arises of a grim moral dilemma: Which patients should be prioritized if medical resources are scarce?

Newswise: 247273_web.jpg
Released: 29-Oct-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Escaping the 'Era of Pandemics': experts warn worse crises to come; offer options to reduce risk
The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)

Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns a major new report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world.


Showing results

110 of 3837

close
1.7595