Washington University in St. Louis

Suppression of COVID-19 spread is possible, suggests new model

Any policy ‘refocus’ must include self-isolation/quarantine — maybe via enticements

Newswise — Suppression of the spread of COVID-19 is an attainable goal, and it can be done through strategies that ease social distancing guidelines, suggests a new model developed by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the Brookings Institution.

“Suppression means not just ‘flattening the curve’ by spreading out infections over time, but ongoing containment that prevents sustained spread and a large number of new cases,” said Ross Hammond, the Betty Bofinger Brown Associate Professor at the Brown School and collaborator on the TRACE (Testing Responses through Agent-based Computational Epidemiology) model. TRACE is a sophisticated computational simulation to inform policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.

“Our analysis based on the TRACE model identifies promising intervention strategies to successfully suppress the spread of COVID-19 while allowing relaxation of many or all of the mass social distancing measures that have been in place across the country,” said Hammond, who is also a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution.

“As states are reopening, many approaches involve widespread testing, coupled with contact tracing and selective quarantine,” Hammond added. “Yet key questions in designing such policies remain difficult to answer. How much testing capacity is really needed? How important is accuracy? How much capacity to trace contacts is needed? What is the most efficient way to use limited testing capacity? How might success depend on still-uncertain assumptions about the spread of the disease itself? What social distancing measures might still be needed to enhance containment?

“Getting the answers ‘right’ may be the difference between success or failure in containing COVID-19. The TRACE model was designed for this purpose.”

TRACE is not a forecasting model, Hammond pointed out.

It is intended instead as a policy laboratory to assist in the design of effective containment policies using testing and contact tracing, he said.

“By considering a very wide array of possible policy variations, capturing scenarios that encompass the extensive uncertainty still surrounding COVID-19, and providing specific quantitative inputs and outcomes, TRACE aims to be a practical tool to help decision-makers manage many of the implementation decisions they face in crafting a reopening strategy,” he said. “TRACE is an agent-based computational model, allowing it to include variations in age, activity pattern, infectivity and contact networks — all features that evidence so far suggests are important determinants of how COVID-19 spreads.”

One key strategy still includes limited social distancing.

However, Hammond said, the model shows that quarantining and self-isolation remain critical components that must stay uniformly consistent — possibly through strategies to entice and support such habits.

“All of the policies we simulated underscore the importance of sufficient adherence by individual citizens to quarantine, self-isolation or limited social distancing measures,” Hammond said. “This indicates that an important goal for policy may be to encourage adherence through consistent, widespread messaging and to make self-isolation financially and logistically feasible.

“The goal of reopening large parts of the country while suppressing COVID-19 and preventing a large second wave of infection may well be possible and not that far out of reach from our current capabilities,” he said. “But to do this, we will likely need to refocus and re-orient our current approach to make best use of limited resources, and we will need to tailor features of any specific policy implementation to local conditions to maximize chances of success.

“TRACE was designed to help facilitate this process, and we hope it will prove a valuable resource for decision-makers working to bring our country through this crisis.”

WashU Response to COVID-19
Visit coronavirus.wustl.edu for the latest information about WashU updates and policies. See all stories related to COVID-19.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 4206
Newswise: Proteolytic Enzymes for Covid-19 Studied in 3D for the First Time in Thailand by Chula Biochemists
Released: 4-Dec-2020 8:45 AM EST
Proteolytic Enzymes for Covid-19 Studied in 3D for the First Time in Thailand by Chula Biochemists
Chulalongkorn University

A team of biochemists from Chulalongkorn University became the first researchers in Thailand to study proteolytic enzymes for the Covid–19 virus at a molecular level in 3D, possibly leading to the development of Covid–19 treatments.

Newswise: UC San Diego Bolsters Aggressive Return to Learn Plan to Prevent Outbreaks on Campus
Released: 4-Dec-2020 8:35 AM EST
UC San Diego Bolsters Aggressive Return to Learn Plan to Prevent Outbreaks on Campus
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego’s nationally recognized, evidence-based Return to Learn program employs a comprehensive suite of education, monitoring, testing, intervention and notification tools that no other university is using. And the program continues to expand—including a recent introduction of weekly self-administered student testing kits, growth of the campus’s wastewater viral monitoring program and widespread use of the cellphone-based CA COVID Notify exposure notification system.

Newswise: Pediatric ER Saw Steep Drop in Asthma Visits During Spring COVID-19 Lockdown
1-Dec-2020 8:00 AM EST
Pediatric ER Saw Steep Drop in Asthma Visits During Spring COVID-19 Lockdown
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society discusses a steep drop off from prior years in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits at Boston Children’s Hospital during the spring 2020 COVID-19 surge and lockdown.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 9-Dec-2020 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 3-Dec-2020 4:50 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 9-Dec-2020 4:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 9-Dec-2020 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 3-Dec-2020 3:50 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 9-Dec-2020 4:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 250384_web.jpg
Released: 3-Dec-2020 3:05 PM EST
Study finds COVID-19 hindering US academic productivity of faculty with young children
University of Tennessee Health Science Center

The academic productivity of higher education faculty In the United States in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields with very young children suffered as a result of the stay-at-home orders during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan School of Medicine.

Released: 3-Dec-2020 2:50 PM EST
Kidney disease leading risk factor for COVID-related hospitalization
Geisinger Health System

An analysis of Geisinger's electronic health records has revealed chronic kidney disease to be the leading risk factor for hospitalization from COVID-19.

Newswise: Identity Verification During the Age of COVID-19
Released: 3-Dec-2020 2:25 PM EST
Identity Verification During the Age of COVID-19
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

S&T's Biometric Technology Rally focused on the ability of acquisition systems and matching algorithms to recognize travelers without asking them to remove their masks, thereby reducing risk for frontline workers.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 10-Dec-2020 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 3-Dec-2020 2:20 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 10-Dec-2020 11:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.


Showing results

110 of 4206

close
1.40633