Steve  Fletcher, PhD

Steve Fletcher, PhD

University of Portsmouth

Professor of Ocean Policy and Economy, and Director of the Sustainability and the Environment Research Theme

Expertise: ConservationConservationdeep oceandeep oceanPlastic PollutionPlastic Pollution

I am Professor of Ocean Policy and Economy, and Director of the Sustainability and the Environment research theme, at the University. 

As an advocate for global ocean conservation and a sustainable future, I’m committed to furthering research and activities – inside and outside the University – that generate positive impact for people and the planet.

As Theme Director for Sustainability and Environment research, my aim is to build on existing successes in ocean research by encouraging interdisciplinary, cross-University working. I’m also keen to strengthen emerging potential areas of excellence, which include growing agendas around sustainable food and sustainable fashion. 

I also lead the University’s Revolution Plastics initiative – driving interdisciplinary research and innovation to solve challenges in areas as diverse as recycling, packaging and wastewater treatment.

I am one of the top 10 most-cited scientists in the field of Marine Policy (Google Scholar), with more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and research reports, and my expertise in ocean conservation has been developed during 20 years of research and practice. 

This has been recognised by my role as Ocean Lead of the International Resource Panel by UN Environment, and my former role as Chief Strategy Officer for the UN Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre. I continue to work extensively with the UN family of ocean and biodiversity conventions, governments, agencies, businesses, universities and a wider network of international conservation organisations.

After graduating with a BSc (Hons) in Geography (University of Wales, Aberystwyth), I completed an MSc in Coastal Zone Management (Bournemouth University). 

After working as a Scientific Officer at the government’s Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), I completed a PgCert in Teaching and Learning in HE, then a PhD in Coastal Management in the UK (both Nottingham Trent University).

I have also previously served as the University of Plymouyh’s Director of the Centre for Marine and Coastal Policy Research, and as Associate Head of the School of Marine Science and Engineering – and held positions on the editorial boards of the Coastal Management Journal and the Journal of Geography in Higher Education. 

Title

Cited By

Year

COUNTRIES AGREE TO END PLASTIC POLLUTION IN AMBITIOUS GLOBAL TREATY

Nearly 200 nations, endorsed a historic resolution at the UN Environment Assembly in Nairobi to end plastic pollution, and forge an international legally binding agreement, by the end of 2024.
14-Mar-2022 10:05:18 AM EDT

UNIVERSITY SUPPORTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF A GLOBAL AGREEMENT TO TACKLE PLASTIC POLLUTION

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has enlisted the help of the University’s Global Plastics Policy Centre to inform negotiations for the possible adoption of an international agreement to tackle plastic pollution.
14-Mar-2022 10:00:23 AM EDT

New global policy centre launched during COP26 to tackle the world’s plastic pollution problem

The University of Portsmouth will launch its Global Plastics Policy Centre at the COP26 Climate Conference in Glasgow today - 4th November, to help find sustainable solutions to tackle plastic pollution around the world.
04-Nov-2021 09:20:20 AM EDT

Expert to comment on the World Leaders Summit at COP26

Professor Fletcher is one of the top 10 most-cited scientists in the field of Marine Policy (Google Scholar), with more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and research reports, and his expertise in ocean conservation has been developed during 20 years of research and practice.
25-Oct-2021 09:00:07 AM EDT

New UN report calls for urgent help for world’s oceans

A new United Nations report calls for an urgent change in the way the world’s oceans are managed.
22-Jun-2021 09:00:03 AM EDT

"We expect that the amount of plastic entering the ocean will triple by 2040 and we expect the amount of plastic stock in the ocean to quadruple from 2040 and the existing policies that governments and industries combined have in place, will only reduce that growth by 7%. So there is a massive increase in plastics entering the oceans and the stock of plastics in the ocean and existing policies are entirely inadequate to tackle that."

- https://www.newswise.com/politics/keeping-carbon-in-the-sea-keeping-plastics-out-keeping-sea-level-down-live-expert-panel-for-april-27-2pm-et/?article_id=749945

"[...] the problem if anything was worsening rather than improving and the policy situation is worsened by individual policies being very piecemeal – so banning plastic bags, or earbuds or microplastics in beauty products is great, to some extent, but it doesn’t solve the problem. The problem is producing too much plastic, it’s about poor disposal of plastic and poor opportunities to recycle and reduce or somehow bring that waste plastic back into the economy in some way."

- https://www.newswise.com/politics/keeping-carbon-in-the-sea-keeping-plastics-out-keeping-sea-level-down-live-expert-panel-for-april-27-2pm-et/?article_id=749945

" [...] what we can do is – rethink product design, and so in the initial design of the product – let’s just put one plastic in that – let’s make sure that that one plastic is a plastic that can be recycled at the end of its useful life. Or even better – let’s not recycle it at all, let’s make sure that we can reuse that product or we can repair it, so we’re being really efficient with our use of resources."

- https://www.newswise.com/politics/keeping-carbon-in-the-sea-keeping-plastics-out-keeping-sea-level-down-live-expert-panel-for-april-27-2pm-et/?article_id=749945

"The cheapness of plastics largely comes from the fact that the negative implications of plastics like gluten or impacts on human health are never included in the price you pay for the raw materials, so it’s called an externality, so the external impacts of the products and the costs are never internalised or never included in the price of the product or the material in the first place. So we have this slightly crazy situation where it’s cheaper to extract fossil fuels and make what are called virgin plastics or brand-new plastics, than recycling plastics that we already have."

- https://www.newswise.com/politics/keeping-carbon-in-the-sea-keeping-plastics-out-keeping-sea-level-down-live-expert-panel-for-april-27-2pm-et/?article_id=749945

Available for logged-in users onlyLogin HereorRegister
close
0.09892