Latest News from: American Institute of Physics (AIP)

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Article ID: 696217

New Material for Splitting Water

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Solar energy is clean and abundant, but when the sun isn't shining, you must store the energy in batteries or through a process called photocatalysis. In photocatalytic water splitting, sunlight separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen and oxygen can then be recombined in a fuel cell to release energy. Now, a new class of materials -- halide double perovskites -- may have just the right properties to split water, according to a newly published paper in Applied Physics Letters.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 9:45 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695842

Report: First Job for Doctorate Physicists Tends to Set Course for Career

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

When doctorate physicists search for a first job, they may not be expecting to stay within whichever sector they end up in, but according to a new report from the Statistical Research Center at the American Institute of Physics, most do. The report, titled “Physics PhDs 10 Years Later: Movement Across Job Sectors,” reveals that physicists with doctorates rarely move from one broad employment sector to another.

Released:
8-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695401

Does Living Near Wind Turbines Negatively Impact Human Health?

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Wind turbines are a source of clean renewable energy, but some people who live nearby describe the shadow flicker, the audible sounds and the subaudible sound pressure levels as “annoying.” They claim this nuisance negatively impacts their quality of life. Researchers in Canada set out to investigate how residential distance from the wind turbines affects people’s health; they report their new analysis in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America.

Released:
31-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695524

Blowing Bubbles for Cancer Treatment

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Embolization -- the use of various techniques to cut off the blood vessels that feed tissue growth -- has gained traction over the past few decades to treat cancerous tumors, and one specific version is gas embolotherapy. During this process, the blood supply is cut off using acoustic droplet vaporization, which uses microscopic gas bubbles induced by exposure to ultrasonic waves. Researchers have discovered that these bubbles could also be used as potential drug delivery systems. The researchers report their findings this week in Applied Physics Letters.

Released:
4-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 695281

Building Nanomaterials for Next-Generation Computing

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Nanoscientists at Northwestern University have developed a blueprint to fabricate new heterostructures from different types of 2-D materials, single atom layers that can be stacked together like “nano-interlocking building blocks.” Materials scientists and physicists are excited about the properties of 2-D materials and their potential applications. The researchers describe their blueprint for nanoheterostructures in the Journal of Applied Physics.

Released:
30-May-2018 10:20 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694952

The Vessel Not Taken: Understanding Disproportionate Blood Flow

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Considering the size of red blood cells, a new model for blood flow sheds light on why blood sometimes prefers some vessels over others.

Released:
22-May-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694735

The Price of Chaos: A New Model Virtually Pits New Investors Against Experienced Ones

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Variation in expertise and risk-taking behaviors among investors regularly sends markets on roller-coaster rides. Researchers describe the intricate dynamics driving a financial markets model in this week’s Chaos. Their model takes aim to simulate asset pricing when mixed groups of investors enter a market. By examining bifurcation conditions, they described transitions between different chaotic dynamical regimes. They showed that their model can reflect the nature of real markets by switching between bear and bull dynamics.

Released:
17-May-2018 9:20 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694875

A Better Way to Control Crystal Vibrations

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

By introducing impurities to a material, researchers can control the speed and frequency of phonons, potentially leading to more energy-efficient devices

Released:
21-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694692

Robotic Assembly of the World’s Smallest House -- Even A Mite Doesn’t Fit Through the Door!

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A French nanorobotics team has assembled a new microrobotics system that pushes forward the frontiers of optical nanotechnologies. Combining several existing technologies, the µRobotex nanofactory builds microstructures in a large vacuum chamber and fixes components onto optical fiber tips with nanometer accuracy. The microhouse construction, reported in the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, demonstrates how researchers can advance optical sensing technologies when they manipulate ion guns, electron beams and finely controlled robotic piloting.

Released:
18-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693548

Decoding Tornadoes’ Infrasound Waves

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Tornado-producing storms can emit infrasound more than an hour before tornadogenesis, which inspired a group of researchers to develop a long-range, passive way of listening in on storms. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Brian Elbing will present his group’s work collecting infrasound measurements from tornadoes to decode information contained in waves about the formation processes and life cycle before potentially devastating storms hit.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 10:10 AM EDT
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