Newswise — The project, supported by ​​Schmidt Futures, will fundamentally change how scientists use modern computational methods to make sense of big data from Vera C. Rubin Observatory, a joint initiative of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE), which is operated jointly by NSF’s NOIRLab and DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC). The primary mission of Rubin Observatory is to carry out the Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), which will generate an unprecedented dataset for scientific research supported by both NSF and DOE. Scientists and software engineers from the Community Science and Data Center (CSDC) at NOIRLab will collaborate with teams from the University of Washington and Carnegie Mellon University to ensure the resulting analysis framework is accessible to the broader astronomical community.

The software funded by this gift will magnify the scientific return on the public investment by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to build and operate Rubin Observatory’s revolutionary telescope, camera, and data systems,” said CSDC Director Adam Bolton. "Through AURA’s membership in the LSST Corporation, we are able to connect with this project from its inception, which will allow us to engage NOIRLab users during the development phase and to support their use of these new tools in their future research."

​​Schmidt Futures is a philanthropic initiative founded by Eric and Wendy Schmidt. This project is part of Schmidt Futures’s work in astrophysics, which aims to accelerate our knowledge about the Universe by supporting the development of software and hardware platforms to facilitate research across the field of astronomy.

With the Legacy Survey of Space and Time, Rubin Observatory in northern Chile will usher in a golden age for time-domain astronomy by collecting and processing more than 20 terabytes of data each night — and up to 10 petabytes each year for 10 years — and will build detailed composite images of the southern sky. Over its expected decade of observations, astrophysicists estimate that the Rubin Observatory LSST Camera, funded by DOE and built at SLAC, will detect and capture images of an estimated 30 billion stars, galaxies, star clusters, and asteroids. The observatory will survey the entire visible southern sky every few nights and will essentially create a “time-lapse” movie of changes over different timescales to learn about the risks from asteroids, the nature of dark matter and dark energy, and many other phenomena in the changing Universe.

"Our goal is to maximize the scientific output and societal impact of the LSST, and these analysis tools will go a huge way toward doing just that,” said Jeno Sokoloski, Director for Science at the LSST Corporation. “They will be freely available to all researchers, students, teachers, and members of the general public."

Rubin Observatory will produce an unprecedented dataset through the Legacy Survey of Space and Time. To take advantage of this opportunity, the LSST Corporation created the LSST Interdisciplinary Network for Collaboration and Computing (LINCC), whose launch was announced on 9 August 2021 at the Rubin Observatory Project Community Workshop. A primary goal of LINCC, jointly based at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Washington, is to create new and improved analysis techniques that can accommodate the scale and complexity of the data, creating meaningful and useful pipelines of discovery for LSST data.

The support from Schmidt Futures will allow LINCC to build critical infrastructure and develop tools to help enable the large-scale science that will be fueled by the LSST data. The software will be made freely available to the entire astrophysics community. The LSST Corporation will run programs to engage the astrophysics community in the design, testing, and use of the new tools. CSDC will integrate the new tools within NOIRLab’s portfolio of research-enabling data services and make them accessible to all astronomers.

Tools that utilize the power of cloud computing will allow any researcher to search and analyze data at the scale of the LSST, not just speeding up the rate at which we make discoveries but changing the scientific questions that we can ask,” said Andrew Connolly from the University of Washington.

Northwestern University and the University of Arizona, in addition to Carnegie Mellon and the University of Washington, are hub sites for LINCC. The University of Pittsburgh will partner with the Carnegie Mellon hub.

More information

NSF’s NOIRLab (National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory), the US center for ground-based optical-infrared astronomy, operates the international Gemini Observatory (a facility of NSFNRC–CanadaANID–ChileMCTIC–BrazilMINCyT–Argentina, and KASI–Republic of Korea), Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), the Community Science and Data Center (CSDC), and Vera C. Rubin Observatory (operated in cooperation with the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). It is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under a cooperative agreement with NSF and is headquartered in Tucson, Arizona. The astronomical community is honored to have the opportunity to conduct astronomical research on Iolkam Du’ag (Kitt Peak) in Arizona, on Maunakea in Hawai‘i, and on Cerro Tololo and Cerro Pachón in Chile. We recognize and acknowledge the very significant cultural role and reverence that these sites have to the Tohono O'odham Nation, to the Native Hawaiian community, and to the local communities in Chile, respectively.

Rubin Observatory is a joint initiative of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to carry out the Legacy Survey of Space and Time, providing an unprecedented dataset for scientific research supported by both agencies. Rubin is operated jointly by NSF’s NOIRLab and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).  NOIRLab is managed for NSF by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and SLAC is operated for DOE by Stanford University

Links

 

Una nueva iniciativa ayudará a los astrónomos a resolver los misterios del Universo con “Big Data” desde Chile

Programas computacionales de código abierto transformarán las herramientas de los astrónomos para analizar grandes datos científicos producidos en el telescopio Vera C. Rubin.

Una contribución que se prolongará por varios años, permitirá la creación de un nuevo software para analizar los conjuntos de datos de la futura Investigación del Espacio-Tiempo como Legado para la posteridad (LSST), del programa del Observatorio Vera C. Rubin que se está construyendo en Chile. El esfuerzo, liderado por la Universidad de Carnegie Mellon y la Universidad de Washington, permitirá desarrollar la ciencia a gran escala que resultará de los nuevos datos obtenidos en Vera C. Rubin. El Centro de Datos para la Comunidad Científica de NOIRLab de NSF, contribuirá con el equipo para poner el software a disposición de la comunidad científica en forma gratuita.

El proyecto apoyado por la Fundación Schmidt Futures a la comunidad científica, cambiará la forma en que los científicos utilizan los métodos computacionales modernos para dar sentido a los enormes datos provenientes del Programa del Observatorio Vera C. Rubin, una iniciativa conjunta de la Fundación Nacional de Ciencia (NSF) y el Departamento de Energía de los Estados Unidos (DOE), que es operado en conjunto por NOIRLab de NSF y el SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) de DOE. 

La misión principal de Rubin consiste en llevar a cabo la Investigación del Espacio-Tiempo como Legado para la posteridad (LSST por sus siglas en inglés), que va a generar un conjunto de datos sin precedentes para la investigación científica que será apoyada por NSF y DOE. Los científicos y los ingenieros en software del Centro de Datos para la Comunidad Científica (CSDC por sus siglas en inglés), que forma parte de NOIRLab, van a colaborar con los equipos de la Universidad de Washington y de la Universidad de Carnegie Mellon para garantizar que el marco de análisis resultante sea accesible para la comunidad astronómica en general.

El software financiado por esta donación incrementará el rendimiento científico de la inversión pública de la Fundación Nacional de Ciencia y del Departamento de Energía para construir y operar el revolucionario telescopio, la cámara y los sistemas de datos de Rubin”, explicó el director del CSDC, Adam Bolton. "A través de la participación de AURA en la Corporación LSST, podemos conectarnos con este proyecto desde su inicio, lo que nos permitirá involucrar a los usuarios de NOIRLab durante la fase de desarrollo y apoyar el uso de estas nuevas herramientas en sus investigaciones futuras".

La Fundación Schmidt Futures, una iniciativa filantrópica fundada por Eric y Wendy Schmidt. Este proyecto es parte del trabajo en astrofísica que apunta a impulsar y acelerar nuestro conocimiento sobre el Universo, mediante el apoyo al desarrollo de plataformas de software y hardware, facilitando la investigación en el campo de la astronomía.

Con la Investigación del Espacio-Tiempo como Legado para la posteridad (LSST), Rubin marcará el comienzo de una era dorada para la astronomía en el dominio del tiempo, desde el norte de Chile, al recopilar y procesar más de 20 terabytes de datos cada noche, y hasta 10 petabytes cada año durante una década, además de crear detalladas imágenes compuestas del cielo del hemisferio sur. Durante ese tiempo, los astrofísicos estiman que la cámara LSST de Rubin  —financiada por DOE y construida en SLAC—, va a detectar y capturar imágenes de aproximadamente 30 mil millones de estrellas, galaxias, cúmulos estelares y asteroides. El observatorio inspeccionará todo el cielo del hemisferio sur visible cada pocas noches creando una película rápida o “time-lapse” de cambios en el cielo, en diferentes escalas de tiempo para conocer los riesgos de los asteroides, la naturaleza de la materia y la energía oscura, además de muchos otros fenómenos en el cambiante Universo.

"Nuestra meta consiste en maximizar la producción científica y el impacto social de LSST, y estas herramientas de análisis contribuirán enormemente a lograrlo", precisó Jeno Sokoloski, director de ciencia de la Corporación LSST. "Estarán disponibles gratuitamente para todos los investigadores, estudiantes, profesores y miembros del público en general", agregó.

El Programa del Observatorio Rubin va a producir un conjunto de datos sin precedentes mediante la Investigación del Espacio-Tiempo como Legado para la posteridad (LSST). Para aprovechar esta oportunidad, la Corporación LSST, creó la Red Interdisciplinaria para la Colaboración y Computación (LINCC por sus siglas en inglés), con base conjunta en la Universidad Carnegie Mellon y la Universidad de Washington. Uno de los principales objetivos de LINCC consiste en crear técnicas de análisis nuevas y mejoradas que puedan adaptarse a la escala y complejidad de los datos, creando canales de descubrimiento significativos y útiles para los datos LSST. El lanzamiento de LINCC fue anunciado el 9 de agosto de 2021 en el Taller Comunitario del Proyecto Observatorio Rubin.

El apoyo de Schmidt Futures permitirá a LINCC construir una infraestructura crítica y desarrollar herramientas que ayuden a realizar  ciencia a gran escala que será impulsada por los datos de LSST. El software estará disponible gratuitamente para toda la comunidad astronómica. Por su parte, LSST Corporation va a ejecutar programas para involucrar a la comunidad astronómica en el diseño, prueba y uso de las nuevas herramientas. En tanto, CSDC integrará las nuevas herramientas dentro de la cartera de servicios de datos que permiten la investigación de NOIRLab y las hará accesibles a todos los astrónomos.

"Las herramientas que utilizan el poder de la computación en la nube permitirán a cualquier investigador buscar y analizar datos a la escala del LSST, no solo acelerando la velocidad a la que hacemos descubrimientos, sino también cambiando las preguntas científicas que podemos hacer", dijo Andrew Connolly, de la Universidad de Washington.

La Universidad Northwestern y la Universidad de Arizona, además de Carnegie Mellon y la Universidad de Washington, son sitios centrales para LINCC. En tanto que la Universidad de Pittsburgh se asociará con el centro Carnegie Mellon.

Más Información

NOIRLab de NSF (Laboratorio Nacional de Investigación en Astronomía Óptica-Infrarroja de NSF), el centro de EE. UU. para la astronomía óptica-infrarroja en tierra, opera el Observatorio internacional Gemini (una instalación de NSFNRC–CanadaANID–ChileMCTIC–BrasilMINCyT–Argentina y KASI – República de Corea), el Observatorio Nacional de Kitt Peak (KPNO), el Observatorio Interamericano Cerro Tololo (CTIO), el Centro de Datos para la Comunidad Científica (CSDC) y el Observatorio Vera C. Rubin, operado en cooperación con el National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) del Departamento de Energía de Estados Unidos (DOE). Está administrado por la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA) en virtud de un acuerdo de cooperación con NSF y tiene su sede en Tucson, Arizona. La comunidad astronómica tiene el honor de tener la oportunidad de realizar investigaciones astronómicas en Iolkam Du’ag (Kitt Peak) en Arizona, en Maunakea, en Hawai‘i, y en Cerro Tololo y Cerro Pachón en Chile. Reconocemos y apreciamos el importante rol cultural y la veneración que estos sitios tienen para la Nación Tohono O’odham, para la comunidad nativa de Hawai‘i, y para las comunidades locales en Chile, respectivamente.

El Observatorio Rubin es una iniciativa conjunta de la Fundación Nacional de Ciencia de los Estados Unidos  (NSF) y el Departamento de Energía (DOE). Su misión principal es llevar a cabo la Investigación del Espacio-Tiempo como Legado para la posteridad (LSST), proporcionando un conjunto de datos sin precedentes para la investigación científica respaldada por ambas agencias. Rubin es operado conjuntamente por NOIRLab de NSF y el Laboratorio Nacional del Acelerador SLAC (SLAC). NOIRLab es administrado para NSF por la Asociación de Universidades para la Investigación en Astronomía (AURA) y SLAC es operado para DOE por la Universidad de Stanford.

Enlaces