Cancer Care Can’t Wait

Colorectal cancer screening remains a priority amidst COVID-19
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Newswise — New Brunswick, N.J., July 27, 2020 –The presence of COVID-19 has caused many people to fear venturing out for vital medical services like cancer screenings. According to projections from the National Cancer Institute, disruptions in routine cancer care due to the pandemic could lead up to an excess 10,000 deaths from breast and colorectal cancers. Most colorectal cancers can be prevented through regular screening through detection and removal of polyps, so it is important to follow through with appointments for essential care, even during this challenging time. We are doing everything possible to make it safe for our patients to return to getting their important medical care.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer in both men and women, according to the American Cancer Society. It may lead to blood in the stool but frequently does not cause any symptoms until it is advanced and starts to spread through the body. If diagnosed at a later stage, the disease can be more challenging to treat.

Colorectal cancer screening is used to detect cancer and remove precancerous polyps. It is typically recommended by the American Cancer Society that colorectal cancer screening for men and women should begin at age 45 and repeated every ten years for those of average risk. Those with a family history and other underlying conditions should speak with their health care provider to determine what screening regimen is appropriate for them. If screening detects an abnormality, diagnosis and treatment can occur quickly. Finding and removing early stage colon cancers is almost always curative. Cancers that have spread beyond the colon or rectum can be much more difficult to treat.  

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in partnership with RWJBarnabas Health are hard at work to provide this sort of care close to home and minimize the risk of patients and other healthcare workers from developing COVID-19. We are working hard to reduce risks by screening all patients and clinical employees, following social distancing measures, and enhancing rigorous cleaning practices among other ways in which we maintain a safe environment for you and all patients.

Schedule an Appointment

To help reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer, ScreenNJ was developed under the leadership of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in partnership with the New Jersey Department of Health. The initiative is a collaboration of organizations across the state committed to improving cancer screening, prevention and education. This resource can be utilized to find local colorectal (as well as lung) cancer screening programs and information about the types of testing and benefits. And for those who may be in need of further examination stemming from a colonoscopy, new patient appointments can be made with one of our cancer specialists by calling 844-CANCERNJ (844-226-2376) or visiting rwjbh.org/beatcancer.

Howard S. Hochster, MD, FACP, is the Associate Director for Clinical Research and Director, Gastrointestinal Oncology Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; and Director of Oncology Research, RWJBarnabas Health.




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Released: 11-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
School spending cuts? Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crises
Binghamton University, State University of New York

With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis.

Newswise: Researchers Create Mask Filtration Effectiveness Hierarchy
11-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Create Mask Filtration Effectiveness Hierarchy
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Infection prevention experts at the UNC Medical Center set out to gather evidence on the fitted filtration efficiency of dozens of different types of masks and mask modifications, including masks sterilized for reuse, expired masks, novel masks sourced from domestic and overseas sources, and homemade masks.

Newswise: Previously, scientists have determined that entry of SARS-CoV-2 into cells occurs through a receptor on the cell surface, known as ACE2. But the McMaster-Waterloo team has found that the ACE2 receptor is at very low levels in human lung tissue.
Released: 11-Aug-2020 8:40 AM EDT
Previously, scientists have determined that entry of SARS-CoV-2 into cells occurs through a receptor on the cell surface, known as ACE2. But the McMaster-Waterloo team has found that the ACE2 receptor is at very low levels in human lung tissue.
McMaster University

Previously, scientists have determined that entry of SARS-CoV-2 into cells occurs through a receptor on the cell surface, known as ACE2. But the McMaster-Waterloo team has found that the ACE2 receptor is at very low levels in human lung tissue.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Vaccine to prevent tuberculosis may help limit spread of COVID-19, Missouri S&T researchers say
Missouri University of Science and Technology

A vaccine developed about a century ago to prevent tuberculosis may also help prevent the transmission of COVID-19, according to two Missouri S&T researchers who examined the spread of COVID-19 among countries that require the vaccine and those that do not.The Missouri S&T researchers analyzed COVID-19-related death and incidence rates among nations that require the BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) vaccine.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Cancer care and screenings must remain a priority during COVID-19
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is committed to safely providing patient care and cancer screenings throughout the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 2:45 PM EDT
What the rest of the world can learn from South Korea's COVID-19 response
University of Colorado Denver

CU Denver researcher investigates how South Korean policy enabled the country to flatten the curve without economic disaster

Released: 10-Aug-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Tulane researchers studying rise in intimate partner violence amid COVID-19 pandemic
Tulane University

Tulane mental health experts say many of the strategies that are critical to ensuring public health are having a major impact on families experiencing intimate partner violence., also known as IPV.

Released: 10-Aug-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Mouthwashes could reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission
Ruhr-Universität Bochum

Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes.

Newswise: Coronavirus transmission risk increases along wildlife supply chains
Released: 10-Aug-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Coronavirus transmission risk increases along wildlife supply chains
PLOS

oronaviruses were detected in a high proportion of bats and rodents in Viet Nam from 2013 to 2014, with an increasing proportion of positive samples found along the wildlife supply chain from traders to large markets to restaurants, according to a study published August 10 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Amanda Fine of the Wildlife Conservation Society and colleagues.


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