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Article ID: 702316

For-Profit Nursing Home Residents More Likely to Be Diagnosed with Neglect Issues

University of Illinois at Chicago

Residents receiving care in for-profit nursing homes are almost twice as likely to experience health issues caused by substandard care compared with clients living in not-for-profit facilities or in homes in the community, according to a new report in the journal Gerontology.The researchers, led by Lee Friedman, associate professor of environmental and occupational health sciences in the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, also found that community-dwelling adults 60 years old and older who need assistance with tasks related to daily living but do not live in a nursing home had the fewest number of clinical signs of neglect compared with those living in any type of nursing facility.

Released:
16-Oct-2018 4:10 PM EDT

Article ID: 702087

AAE Launches New Patient Education Video on Resorption

American Association of Endodontists (AAE)

To help patients better understand the complicated dental process known as resorption and the types of treatment options available to them, the American Association of Endodontists is releasing a new educational video titled “Types of Resorption.”

Released:
15-Oct-2018 9:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701644

American Society of Anesthesiologists announces Perioperative Surgical Home scholarship recipients

American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

SAN FRANCISCO – The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) today announced the recipients of its Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) Scholarship in which awardees will receive funding to participate in the PSH Learning Collaborative 2020 to support the implementation of a PSH pilot at their institution. The three scholars will be formally awarded, and industry supporters recognized for their support, at a special event on Oct. 15 during the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting in San Francisco.

Released:
8-Oct-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 702009

Prescience: Helping Doctors Predict the Future

University of Washington

UW engineers developed a new machine-learning system that can help anesthesiologists predict the likelihood that a patient will experience low blood oxygen levels during surgery. This condition, called hypoxemia, can lead to serious consequences, such as infections and abnormal heart behavior. The team’s system also gives real-world explanations behind its predictions. The researchers estimate that it could improve the ability of anesthesiologists to prevent 2.4 million more hypoxemia cases in the United States every year.

Released:
10-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701881

Johns Hopkins Medicine Names New Senior Vice President of Patient Safety and Quality and Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Allen Kachalia, M.D., J.D., will become the senior vice president of patient safety and quality for Johns Hopkins Medicine and director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, effective Dec. 1.

Released:
9-Oct-2018 2:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Sep-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700885

Better Survival Outcomes for Advanced Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Surgery followed by Radiation than with Radiation plus Hormone Therapy

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Newly published results of a study examining men with locally or regionally advanced prostate cancer show those treated with a radical prostatectomy followed by radiation treatment have a lower risk of death from prostate cancer and improved overall survival in comparison to those treated with radiation plus androgen deprivation therapy. The work was led by a Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey researcher in collaboration with other regional investigators.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700874

Smart Pills Dumb Down Medical Care, Experts Warn

University of Illinois at Chicago

Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology in patient care settings.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 3:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700811

Study at Johns Hopkins Hospital Leads To Changes in Reporting Patient Safety Concerns

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Study at Johns Hopkins Hospital Leads To Changes in Reporting Patient Safety Concerns 09/20/2018 AddThis Sharing Buttons Share to FacebookShare to TwitterShare to EmailShare to PrintShare to More Credit: iStock In a case study published online last week in Academic Medicine, an international team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising concerns.

Released:
20-Sep-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 700668

Silicone Breast Implants Linked to Increased Risk of Some Rare Harms

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Women receiving silicone breast implants may be at increased risk of several rare adverse outcomes compared to the general population, reports a study in Annals of Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
17-Sep-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 700448

Does Your Doctor Trust You?

California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Research by CSUN professor Adam Swenson finds that physicians tend to size up chronic pain patients in unexpected ways.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 4:45 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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