American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Six Self-Care Strategies to Combat Clinician Burnout

Research in Critical Care Nurse provides specific strategies to help promote physical and psychological well-being and reduce burnout

Newswise — Staffing and equipment shortages and other issues related to the COVID-19 pandemic add to the long-standing challenges to reduce burnout among nurses, physicians and other healthcare professionals.

A study published in Critical Care Nurse (CCN) identifies six self-care strategies to combat burnout. Based on interviews conducted in 2017 and 2018, the research may offer guidance for healthcare teams responding to the coronavirus. Among the findings:

  • Finding Meaning in Work: Nurses and physicians alike responded that being able to care for others made them feel that their work was purposeful and meaningful. Remembering one’s initial sense of purpose may renew individuals and motivate them to do what they have a passion for and love.
  • Connecting With an Energy Source: Energy sources may include one’s initial inspiration for becoming a healthcare professional, family support, social connections and spiritual beliefs. Helping patients and families feel better can be a driving force for healthcare providers.
  • Nurturing Interpersonal Connections: Developing trusting and enjoyable work relationships can be fundamental to creating a caring and healing environment and reducing work-related stress. Giving and receiving help from co-workers and from leadership teams is key to a caring work environment and high-quality patient care.
  • Developing an Attitude of Positivity: An optimistic outlook can help healthcare professionals face difficult situations and shift their thoughts to see the good in the overall picture.
  • Performing Emotional Hygiene: Strategies to address psychological well-being include self-reflection, mindfulness, prayer, time with family and friends, adequate sleep and moderate exercise. Setting boundaries between home and work contributes to a healthy work-life balance.
  • Recognizing One’s Uniqueness: Every member of the healthcare team is needed to provide high-quality care to patients and families. Appreciating one’s own strengths and contributions can help individuals find inner strength and power during difficult times.

Principal investigator Holly Wei, PhD, RN, CPN, NEA-BC, is a faculty teaching in the Graduate Nurse Leadership Concentration, College of Nursing, East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina.

“A common issue in nurses and physicians, burnout has long regarded as a potential hazard to healthcare quality and patient safety,” she said. “Developing effective self-care strategies helps promote physical and psychological well-being and reduce burnout.”

The findings are based on face-to-face individual interviews with 20 physicians and nurses from the pediatric intensive care unit and intermediate care unit at a U.S. children’s hospital.

As the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses’ bimonthly clinical practice journal for high-acuity and critical care nurses, CCN is a trusted source of information related to the bedside care of critically and acutely ill patients.

Access the article abstract and full-text PDF by visiting the CCN website at http://ccn.aacnjournals.org.

About Critical Care Nurse: Critical Care Nurse (CCN), a bimonthly clinical practice journal published by the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, provides current, relevant and useful information about the bedside care of critically and acutely ill patients. The award-winning journal also offers columns on traditional and emerging issues across the spectrum of critical care, keeping critical care nurses informed on topics that affect their practice in high-acuity, progressive and critical care settings. CCN enjoys a circulation of more than 120,000 and can be accessed at http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/.

About the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses: For more than 50 years, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) has been dedicated to acute and critical care nursing excellence. The organization’s vision is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families in which acute and critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. AACN is the world's largest specialty nursing organization, with more than 120,000 members and over 200 chapters in the United States.

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 27071 Aliso Viejo, CA 92656-3399; 949-362-2000; www.aacn.org; facebook.com/aacnface; twitter.com/aacnme

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