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UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts available for comment on expected announcement today on whether California K-12 schools should reopen for in-person instruction in the fall amid the pandemic

17-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT, by UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has multiple experts available for comment on the expected announcement today on whether California K-12 schools should reopen for in-person instruction in the fall amid the pandemic. These faculty members include:

  • Dr. Richard Jackson, MD, professor emeritus of environmental health sciences, pediatrician, and former California state public health officer.
  • Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, MD, professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences, and former director of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health's Division of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Dr. David Eisenman, MD, professor-in-residence and director of FSPH's UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters, with extensive experience in public health crisis management.
  • Prof. Vickie Mays, PhD, a psychologist and professor of health policy and management with wide experience in public health, including that of children and adolescents.
  • Prof. Chandra Ford, PhD, a public health expert and director of FSPH's UCLA Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, with wide experience in epidemiology and racism’s relationship to health disparities.
  • Prof. Shira Shafir, PhD, an epidemiologist with experience researching viral spread, the risks of bringing children back to schools, and significant work in school health at the elementary level.
  • Prof. Brian Cole, Dr.P.H., program manager and lead analyst for the Health Impact Assessment Group, conducting HIAs on a wide range of public policies and projects, including school programs. 

To reach these and other experts, please contact the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's Communications Office.

 




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