Jacquelyn Campbell is a national leader in research and advocacy in the field of domestic violence or intimate partner violence (IPV). Her expertise is frequently sought by national and international policy makers in exploring IPV and its health effects on families and communities. Her most recent research in health sequelae has been foundational for the areas of the intersection of HIV and violence against women and how head injuries and strangulation from intimate partner violence can result in undiagnosed and untreated Traumatic Brain Injury. She has consistently advocated for addressing health inequities of marginalized women in this country and globally affected by experiences of violence. She has served as Principle Investigator on 14 federally funded collaborative research investigations through the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Justice, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice (Office of Violence Against Women), and Centers for Disease Control to examine intimate partner homicide and other forms of violence against women as well as interventions and policy initiatives to improve the justice and health care system response. This work has paved the way for a growing body of interdisciplinary knowledge about experiences of violence and health outcomes, risk assessment for lethal and near-lethal domestic violence, and coordinated system (justice, social services, and health) responses to address intimate partner violence. Dr. Campbell has published more than 270 articles, 56 book chapters and seven books, in addition to developing the Danger Assessment, an instrument to assist abused women in accurately determining their level of danger. The Danger Assessment is also the basis of the Lethality Assessment Program (MNADV LAP) for first responders to assess risk of homicide of domestic violence survivors and connect those at high risk with domestic violence services. In collaboration with Dr. Nancy Glass, originator of myPlan, a decision aid for IPV survivors, she is leading an NIH-funded cultural adaptation of myPlan for immigrant and indigenous women. Elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2000, Dr. Campbell also was the Institute of Medicine/American Academy of Nursing/American Nurses' Foundation Senior Scholar in Residence and was founding co-chair of the IOM Forum on the Prevention of Global Violence. Other honors include the Pathfinder Distinguished Researcher by the Friends of the National Institute of Health National Institute for Nursing Research, Outstanding Alumna and Distinguished Contributions to Nursing Science Awards, Duke University School of Nursing, the American Society of Criminology Vollmer Award, and being named one of the inaugural 17 Gilman Scholars at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the Board of Directors for Futures Without Violence, is an active member of the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group, and has served on the boards of the House of Ruth Battered Women's Shelter and four other shelters. She was a member of the congressionally appointed U.S. Department of Defense Task Force on Domestic Violence.

A Lethal Combination

“Domestic violence homicides have gone down. But clearly from the data they have gone down, in part, in great part, because of the gun restrictions that were put on known domestic violence offenders.”

How to Combat Sexual Assault

“So often, when a victim reports the alleged perpetrator, it becomes a he-said, she-said or he-said, he-said. If we did a better job in documenting those injuries we would have an additional source around consent."

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Shootings, suspect with history gun violence and domestic abuse

We need to enforce the gun laws we already have that keep guns out of the hands of known domestic violence offenders and we need to more carefully explore the link between mass shootings and domestic violence.

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