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Newswise: Continued CO2 Emissions Will Impair Cognition
Released: 21-Apr-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Continued CO2 Emissions Will Impair Cognition
University of Colorado Boulder

New CU Boulder research finds that an anticipated rise in carbon dioxide concentrations in our indoor living and working spaces by the year 2100 could lead to impaired human cognition.

Newswise:Video Embedded robotic-submarine-snaps-first-images-at-foundation-of-antarctic-glacier
VIDEO
Released: 28-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Robotic Submarine Snaps First Images at Foundation of Notorious Antarctic Glacier
Georgia Institute of Technology

These are the first-ever images taken at the foundations of the glacier that inspires more fear of sea-level rise than any other - Thwaites Glacier. The grounding line is integral to Thwaites' fate and that of the world's coastlines.

Newswise: Melting Mongolian Ice Patches May Threaten Reindeer Pastoralism, Archeological Artefacts
13-Nov-2019 2:05 PM EST
Melting Mongolian Ice Patches May Threaten Reindeer Pastoralism, Archeological Artefacts
PLOS

Northern Mongolian “eternal ice” is melting for the first time in memory, threatening the traditional reindeer-herding lifestyle and exposing fragile cultural artifacts to the elements, according to a study published November 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by William Taylor from the Max Planck Institute, Germany, and the University of Colorado-Boulder, USA, and colleagues.

Released: 8-Oct-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Dual Approach Needed to Save Sinking Cities and Bleaching Corals
Duke University

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them precious time in their fight against sea-level rise

13-Sep-2019 8:45 AM EDT
To Address Hunger, Many Countries May Have to Increase Carbon Footprint
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Achieving an adequate, healthy diet in most low- and middle-income countries will require a substantial increase in greenhouse gas emissions and water use due to food production, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Newswise: N.C. Study: Warmer Water Linked to Higher Proportion of Male Flounder
Released: 30-Apr-2019 3:00 PM EDT
N.C. Study: Warmer Water Linked to Higher Proportion of Male Flounder
North Carolina State University

In the wild and in the lab, researchers find a relationship between higher water temperatures and a lower percentage of female flounder, a cause for concern.

Newswise: Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source
Released: 19-Nov-2018 4:05 PM EST
Amazonian Peatlands May Soon Switch From a Carbon Sink to a Carbon Source
Arizona State University (ASU)

Until humans can find a way to geoengineer ourselves out of the climate disaster we’ve created, we must rely on natural carbon sinks, such as oceans and forests, to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. These ecosystems are deteriorating at the hand of climate change. Once destroyed, they may not only stop absorbing carbon from the atmosphere, but start emitting it.

Newswise: Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer
Released: 15-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
Global Warming Will Have Us Crying in What’s Left of Our Beer
University of California, Irvine

On top of rising sea levels, stronger hurricanes and worsening wildfires, scientists project that human-caused climate change will result in one of the most dire consequences imaginable: a disruption in the global beer supply.

Newswise: Most Fires in Florida go Undetected
Released: 13-Sep-2018 11:30 AM EDT
Most Fires in Florida go Undetected
Florida State University

New study indicates common satellite imaging technologies vastly underestimate number of fires in Florida, detecting only 25 percent of burn area.

Newswise: WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean
Released: 20-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
WCS Criticizes the Elimination of U.S. National Ocean Policy, Undermining the Health of the Ocean
Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS Executive Vice President for Public Affairs John Calvelli issued the following statement concerning rescission of the U.S. National Ocean Policy:

Newswise: Whether Wheat Weathers Heat Waves
Released: 20-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Whether Wheat Weathers Heat Waves
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Unlike humans, crops in a field can't move to air conditioning to endure a heat wave. Scientists in Australia are working to understand how heat waves impact wheat.

Newswise: Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change
Released: 7-Jun-2018 2:45 PM EDT
Consumers’ Food Choices Can Help Reduce Greenhouse Emissions Contributing to Climate Change
Tufts University

Changes in diet have been proposed as a way to reduce carbon emissions from the food system. A new study provides the latest and most comprehensive estimate of greenhouse gas emissions generated by U.S. consumer food purchases, and assesses how those choices could affect diet and climate change.

Newswise: New Research Finds Tall and Older Amazonian Forests More Resistant to Droughts
Released: 30-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT
New Research Finds Tall and Older Amazonian Forests More Resistant to Droughts
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

A new Columbia Engineering study shows that photosynthesis in tall Amazonian forests--forests above 30m--is 3x less sensitive to precipitation variability than in shorter forests of less than 20m. Taller Amazonian forests were also found to be older, have more biomass and deeper rooting systems that enable them to access deeper soil moisture, making them more resilient to drought. The findings suggest that forest height + age are an important regulator of photosynthesis in response to droughts.

Newswise: A Promising Target in the Quest for a 1-Million-Year-Old Antarctic Ice Core
Released: 23-May-2018 3:50 PM EDT
A Promising Target in the Quest for a 1-Million-Year-Old Antarctic Ice Core
University of Washington

The oldest ice core so far provides 800,000 years of our planet’s climate history. A field survey in Antarctica has pinpointed a location where an entire million years of undisturbed ice might be preserved intact.

Newswise: The Isle Royale Winter Study Celebrates 60 Years
15-May-2018 11:00 AM EDT
The Isle Royale Winter Study Celebrates 60 Years
Michigan Technological University

The 2018 report is out: two wolves, almost 1,500 moose and an ecosystem in transition. In its 60th year, the research conducted at Isle Royale National Park is the longest running predator-prey study of its kind.

Newswise: Climate Warming Causes Local Extinction of Rocky Mountain Wildflower Species
20-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
Climate Warming Causes Local Extinction of Rocky Mountain Wildflower Species
University of Colorado Boulder

New University of Colorado Boulder-led research has established a causal link between climate warming and the localized extinction of a common Rocky Mountain flowering plant, a result that could serve as a herald of future population declines.

Newswise:Video Embedded cleaner-ship-fuels-will-benefit-health,-but-affect-climate-too
VIDEO
Released: 6-Feb-2018 4:05 PM EST
Cleaner Ship Fuels Will Benefit Health, but Affect Climate Too
University of Delaware

Marine shipping fuels will get a whole lot cleaner in 2020 when a regulation by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) requires fuels to contain 80-86 percent less sulphur.This is the most significant improvement in global fuel standards for the shipping industry in 100 years, intended to achieve significant health benefits on a global scale.

Newswise: New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance Launches Social Media Campaign
Released: 24-Jan-2018 12:00 AM EST
New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance Launches Social Media Campaign
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Did you know that New Jersey can expect higher temperatures, heavier rains, rising sea levels and more frequent and severe coastal flooding this century? The New Jersey Climate Adaptation Alliance – facilitated by Rutgers University–New Brunswick – has launched a social media campaign to enhance public education and to guide people to a wealth of information on climate change resilience on its website.

Newswise: Mothers and Young Struggle as Arctic Warms
Released: 18-Jan-2018 3:50 PM EST
Mothers and Young Struggle as Arctic Warms
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and partners reveals for the first time the ways in which wild weather swings and extreme icing events are negatively impacting the largest land mammal of the Earth’s polar realms—the muskoxen. The paper demonstrates that while this denizen of the Arctic and other cold-adapted species have spectacular adaptations, the previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow events, winter precipitation, and ice tidal surges are costly for the animals, if not deadly.

Newswise: Are Wetlands Really the “Earth’s Kidneys”?
Released: 15-Dec-2017 1:05 AM EST
Are Wetlands Really the “Earth’s Kidneys”?
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Healthy wetlands are hard-working water filters! The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) December 15 Soils Matter blog post explains the role of wetlands—and how we can keep them functioning.

Newswise: Rainfall Can Indicate That Mosquito-Borne Epidemics Will Occur Weeks Later
Released: 21-Nov-2017 5:05 PM EST
Rainfall Can Indicate That Mosquito-Borne Epidemics Will Occur Weeks Later
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall. Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate at the same time.

Newswise: New Trillion Trees Partnership Calls for Global Efforts to Protect and Restore 1 Trillion Trees
Released: 16-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
New Trillion Trees Partnership Calls for Global Efforts to Protect and Restore 1 Trillion Trees
Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS, WWF, and BirdLife International today launched the Trillion Trees programme, a 25-year initiative to help implement and scale global forest commitments and spur greater ambitions towards protecting and restoring one trillion trees by 2050—the number needed to reverse the global decline in tree cover.

Newswise: Easing the Soil’s Temperature
6-Nov-2017 2:05 PM EST
Easing the Soil’s Temperature
American Society of Agronomy (ASA), Crop Science Society of America (CSSA), Soil Science Society of America (SSSA)

Many factors influence the ability of soil to buffer against temperature changes. Recent research shows both perennial biofuel and cover crops help soils shield against extreme temperatures.

Newswise: Climate Change Could Decrease Sun's Ability to Disinfect Lakes, Coastal Waters
Released: 23-Oct-2017 3:05 PM EDT
Climate Change Could Decrease Sun's Ability to Disinfect Lakes, Coastal Waters
National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

One of the largely unanticipated impacts of a changing climate may be a decline in sunlight's ability to disinfect lakes, rivers, and coastal waters, possibly leading to an increase in waterborne pathogens and the diseases they can cause in humans and wildlife.

Newswise: Northern CA Wildfires Generate 1.5 Million Views of UC San Diego’s ‘Firemap’ Resource
Released: 13-Oct-2017 4:05 PM EDT
Northern CA Wildfires Generate 1.5 Million Views of UC San Diego’s ‘Firemap’ Resource
University of California San Diego

A web-based tool recently developed by UC San Diego researchers under an NSF grant to perform data-driven predictive modeling and real-time tracking of fires has already been viewed about one million times and generated more than 115,000 unique visitors since the outbreak of numerous wildfires across Northern California late last weekend.

Newswise: Researchers Identify Free-Flowing Aerosol Particles Using Holograms, Lasers
Released: 3-Oct-2017 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Identify Free-Flowing Aerosol Particles Using Holograms, Lasers
Kansas State University

Holographic images of free-flowing air particles may help climate change and biological weapons watchdogs better monitor the atmosphere, according to a recent Kansas State University study. Principle investigator Matthew Berg, associate professor of physics, said the study, published in Nature's Scientific Reports, is key to understanding the aerosol composition of Earth's atmosphere.

Newswise:Video Embedded fish-out-of-water-loss-of-350-miles-of-great-plains-streams-causing-changes-in-aquatic-food-web
VIDEO
Released: 2-Aug-2017 8:05 AM EDT
Fish Out of Water: Loss of 350 Miles of Great Plains Streams Causing Changes in Aquatic Food Web
Kansas State University

A decrease in Great Plains streams, fed by decreasing ground water, is changing fish assembles according to research published Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: Soils Could Release Much More Carbon than Expected as Climate Warms
Released: 19-Jul-2017 7:05 AM EDT
Soils Could Release Much More Carbon than Expected as Climate Warms
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Deeper soil layers are more sensitive to warming than previously thought.

Newswise: Mississippi Mud May Hold Hope for Louisiana Coast
Released: 12-Jul-2017 3:05 PM EDT
Mississippi Mud May Hold Hope for Louisiana Coast
Tulane University

New study indicates that mud, the most plentiful sediment type carried by the Mississippi River, may be the most powerful tool in building land to keep up sea level rise.

Newswise: With ARM Instruments Watching, an Extensive Summer Melt in West Antarctica
Released: 16-Jun-2017 3:05 PM EDT
With ARM Instruments Watching, an Extensive Summer Melt in West Antarctica
Brookhaven National Laboratory

One day in December of 2015, bound for a remote ice camp in the interior of Antarctica, Scripps Institution of Oceanography doctoral student Ryan Scott boarded a ski-equipped LC-130 turboprop transport plane at McMurdo Station at the south tip of Ross Island. It was austral summer and the temperature outside hovered around -4 degrees Celsius.

Newswise: Defrosting the World’s Freezer: Thawing Permafrost
Released: 14-Jun-2017 11:00 AM EDT
Defrosting the World’s Freezer: Thawing Permafrost
Department of Energy, Office of Science

In some of the coldest places in the world, scientists supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science are studying how permafrost thaws. Using both field and laboratory data, these researchers are collaborating with modelers to improve our understanding of future climate change.

Newswise: New Study: Could Acidifying Oceans Slow Down Coral Disease?
Released: 5-Jun-2017 1:05 PM EDT
New Study: Could Acidifying Oceans Slow Down Coral Disease?
Mote Marine Laboratory

A controlled lab study led by Mote Marine Laboratory and published June 1 in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS ONE revealed that black band disease was less deadly to mountainous star coral (Orbicella faveolata) as water acidified, or decreased in pH.

Newswise: Are Wolverines in the Arctic in the Climate Change Crosshairs?
Released: 23-May-2017 11:05 AM EDT
Are Wolverines in the Arctic in the Climate Change Crosshairs?
Wildlife Conservation Society

Will reductions in Arctic snow cover make tundra-dwelling wolverines more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought? That’s a question scientists hope an innovative method described in a new study co-authored by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) will help answer.

Newswise: Climate Change Refuge for Corals Discovered (and How We Can Protect It Right Now)
Released: 17-May-2017 11:05 AM EDT
Climate Change Refuge for Corals Discovered (and How We Can Protect It Right Now)
Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS scientists have discovered a refuge for corals where the environment protects otherwise sensitive species to the increasing severity of climate change.

Newswise: Rising Temperatures Threaten Stability of Tibetan Alpine Grasslands
7-May-2017 7:05 PM EDT
Rising Temperatures Threaten Stability of Tibetan Alpine Grasslands
Georgia Institute of Technology

A warming climate could affect the stability of alpine grasslands in Asia’s Tibetan Plateau, threatening the ability of farmers and herders to maintain the animals that are key to their existence, and potentially upsetting the ecology of an area in which important regional river systems originate.

Newswise: No Biochar Benefit for Temperate Zone Crops, Says New Report
25-Apr-2017 12:00 PM EDT
No Biochar Benefit for Temperate Zone Crops, Says New Report
Northern Arizona University

Scientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in the Amazon Basin. Since initial studies published several years ago promoted biochar, farmers around the world have been using it as a soil additive to increase fertility and crop yields. But a new study casts doubt on biochar’s efficacy, finding that using it only improves crop growth in the tropics, with no yield benefit at all in the temperate zone.

Newswise: NAU Research Suggests Climate Change Likely to Cause Significant Shift in Grand Canyon Vegetation
Released: 24-Apr-2017 11:45 AM EDT
NAU Research Suggests Climate Change Likely to Cause Significant Shift in Grand Canyon Vegetation
Northern Arizona University

Decreases in river flows and frequency of flooding with future climate warming will likely shift vegetation along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon to species with more drought-tolerant traits.

Newswise: ‘Weather Whiplash’ Triggered by Changing Climate Will Degrade Midwest’s Drinking Water, Researchers Say
Released: 29-Mar-2017 11:05 AM EDT
‘Weather Whiplash’ Triggered by Changing Climate Will Degrade Midwest’s Drinking Water, Researchers Say
University of Kansas

Researchers at the University of Kansas have published findings showing weather whiplash in the American Midwest’s agricultural regions will drive the deterioration of water quality, forcing municipalities to seek costly remedies to provide safe drinking water to residents.

Newswise: MSU’s Vahedifard Examines ‘Lessons From the Oroville Dam’ in Science
Released: 23-Mar-2017 3:05 PM EDT
MSU’s Vahedifard Examines ‘Lessons From the Oroville Dam’ in Science
Mississippi State University

A letter in Science magazine from a Mississippi State faculty member is examining lessons gleaned from the recent Oroville dam incident in California.

Newswise: UNH Research Finds Pattern of Mammal Dwarfing During Global Warming
Released: 15-Mar-2017 4:05 PM EDT
UNH Research Finds Pattern of Mammal Dwarfing During Global Warming
University of New Hampshire

More than 50 million years ago, when the Earth experienced a series of extreme global warming events, early mammals responded by shrinking in size. While this mammalian dwarfism has previously been linked to the largest of these events, research led by the University of New Hampshire has found that this evolutionary process can happen in smaller, so-called hyperthermals, indicating an important pattern that could help shape an understanding of underlying effects of current human-caused climate change.

Newswise: Underestimating Clouds
Released: 6-Mar-2017 10:05 AM EST
Underestimating Clouds
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Feedbacks of clouds on climate change strongly influence the magnitude of global warming.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-catch-extreme-waves-with-higher-resolution-modeling
VIDEO
Released: 15-Feb-2017 5:00 AM EST
Researchers Catch Extreme Waves with Higher-Resolution Modeling
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution models captured hurricanes and big waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, the shipping industry, and surfers.

Newswise: Lab Specializes in Analyzing Brittle Portion of Polar Ice Cores
Released: 2-Feb-2017 3:05 PM EST
Lab Specializes in Analyzing Brittle Portion of Polar Ice Cores
South Dakota State University

Tiny air bubbles compressed within a polar ice core make some sections brittle to the touch, but one ice core lab knows how to handle this delicate part of the chemical analysis, thus making the dating of the entire ice core possible.

Newswise: Coastal Wetlands Excel at Storing Carbon
Released: 1-Feb-2017 11:05 AM EST
Coastal Wetlands Excel at Storing Carbon
University of Maryland, College Park

New analysis supports mangrove forests, tidal marshes and seagrass meadows as effective climate buffers.


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