Latest News from: The Rockefeller University Press

Filters close
Newswise: Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
1-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

Newswise: Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
19-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have identified a key cell signaling pathway that drives the devastating muscle loss, or cachexia, suffered by many cancer patients. The study, which will be published May 22 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this pathway with a drug already in phase 2 clinical trials for diabetes could prevent this syndrome.

Newswise: How herpes simplex virus can evade the immune response to infect the brain
4-May-2020 10:00 AM EDT
How herpes simplex virus can evade the immune response to infect the brain
The Rockefeller University Press

A research team has discovered a molecular mechanism that helps Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) evade the innate immune system and infect the brain causing a rare disease with high mortality. The study from Aarhus University, University of Oxford, and University of Gothenburg, led by first author Chiranjeevi Bodda in Søren Paludan’s lab, will be published May 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM).

Newswise: Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
2-Mar-2020 8:45 AM EST
Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Chicago have discovered that bacteria that usually live in the gut can accumulate in tumors and improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in mice. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that treating cancer patients with Bifidobacteria might boost their response to CD47 immunotherapy, a wide-ranging anti-cancer treatment that is currently being evaluated in several clinical trials.

18-Feb-2020 4:05 PM EST
Rockefeller University Press (RUP) signs Jisc transitional open access agreement for UK higher education
The Rockefeller University Press

Nonprofit publisher Rockefeller University Press (RUP), a department of The Rockefeller University in New York City, has agreed to a deal with Jisc that negotiates open access (OA) agreements with publishers on behalf of all UK universities. RUP is the first US–based university press to sign a transitional agreement with research and education not-for-profit Jisc. The unlimited “read-and-publish” transitional agreement covers RUP’s three hybrid journals, Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) and Journal of General Physiology (JGP).

Newswise: Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
10-Feb-2020 9:55 AM EST
Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a new quality control system that allows cells to remove damaged and potentially toxic proteins from their surroundings. The study, which will be published February 18 in the Journal of Cell Biology, finds that the Clusterin protein and heparan sulfate proteoglycans combine to bring misfolded proteins into cells for degradation. The findings may lead to new therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

Newswise: Activating Immune Cells Could Revitalize the Aging Brain, Study Suggests
29-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Activating Immune Cells Could Revitalize the Aging Brain, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Albany Medical College in New York have discovered that a specific type of immune cell accumulates in older brains, and that activating these cells improves the memory of aged mice. The study, which will be published February 5 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting these cells might reduce age-related cognitive decline and combat aging-associated neurodegenerative disease in humans.

Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer
19-Dec-2019 8:05 AM EST
Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Toronto have identified a key protein that supports the growth of many colorectal cancers. The study, which will be published December 27 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that a protein called Importin-11 transports the cancer-causing protein βcatenin into the nucleus of colon cancer cells, where it can drive cell proliferation. Inhibiting this transport step could block the growth of most colorectal cancers caused by elevated βcatenin levels.

Newswise: Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
16-Dec-2019 10:15 AM EST
Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published December 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat patients infected with Zika or similar viral pathogens, such as the yellow fever and dengue viruses.

Newswise: Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor
7-Nov-2019 12:00 PM EST
Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor
The Rockefeller University Press

The biological actions of insulin are mediated by its receptor—the insulin receptor—which is localized on the cell surface. In a new study, researchers from Germany, Canada, and Finland show how insulin interacts with its receptor at a second binding site. The scientists hope that these new details concerning insulin–receptor interactions will ultimately expand the current models of insulin binding to its receptor and pave the way towards new approaches to structure-based drug design.

Newswise: David Eisner Named Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)
Released: 22-Oct-2019 12:30 PM EDT
David Eisner Named Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP)
The Rockefeller University Press

David Eisner has been selected to serve as the eighth editor-in-chief of the Journal of General Physiology (JGP), effective January 1, 2020. Eisner, the British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiac Physiology at the University of Manchester, succeeds Sharona Gordon, who has led the journal since 2014.

Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis
7-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Pulmonary Fibrosis
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung’s airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach to treating IPF.

Newswise:Video Embedded cancer-cells-turn-to-cannibalism-to-survive-chemotherapy-study-suggests
VIDEO
10-Sep-2019 10:00 AM EDT
Cancer cells turn to cannibalism to survive chemotherapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Tulane University School of Medicine have discovered that some cancer cells survive chemotherapy by eating their neighboring tumor cells. The study, which will be published September 17 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that this act of cannibalism provides these cancer cells with the energy they need to stay alive and initiate tumor relapse after the course of treatment is completed.

Newswise: Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests
7-Aug-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Birth defects associated with Zika virus infection may depend on mother’s immune response, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

New research led by scientists at The Rockefeller University in New York may help explain why Zika virus infection causes birth defects in some children but not others. The study, which will be published August 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that the risk of developing an abnormally small head (microcephaly) depends on the types of antibody produced by pregnant mothers in response to Zika infection.

Newswise: Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body’s immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to viral infection.

Newswise: Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
5-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. The study, which will be published June 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this human protein, known as CXCR4, could be a way to block the parasite’s life cycle and prevent the development of malaria.

Newswise: Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
22-May-2019 9:25 AM EDT
Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
The Rockefeller University Press

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy.

Newswise: Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
13-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.

Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
8-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in New York have found that treating human prostate cancer cells with a drug that targets a protein called PHLPP2 may prevent the cancer cells from spreading to other organs in the body. The study, which will be published May 15 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that inhibiting PHLPP2 lowered the levels of MYC, an oncogenic protein that causes many different types of cancer that cannot be targeted by conventional drug therapies.

Newswise: Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients
4-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients
The Rockefeller University Press

A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia. The study, which will be published April 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, may also help researchers develop treatments to prevent other pregnancy complications associated with lupus, including miscarriage and premature birth.

Newswise: Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer
27-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Spain have discovered that a hormone secreted by fat cells that is present at higher levels in women can stop liver cells from becoming cancerous. The study, which will be published April 3 in the ournal of Experimental Medicine, helps explain why hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is more common in men, and could lead to new treatments for the disease, which is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-discover-how-tumor-killing-immune-cells-attack-lymphomas-in-living-mice
VIDEO
25-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Discover How Tumor-Killing Immune Cells Attack Lymphomas in Living Mice
The Rockefeller University Press

In a study that will be published April 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from the Institut Pasteur and INSERM reveal that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can induce tumor regression by directly targeting and killing cancer cells, uncovering new details of how these immune cells work and how their effectiveness could be improved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and other B cell cancers.

Newswise: Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, study suggests
14-Mar-2019 8:05 AM EDT
Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

British researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study, which will be published March 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting EZH2 could therefore be an effective treatment for AML, an aggressive blood cancer expected to kill over 10,000 people in the US alone this year.

Newswise:Video Embedded gene-transcription-machinery-constrains-dna-movements-study-suggests
VIDEO
27-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. The study, which will be published March 1 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that RNA polymerase II—the key enzyme required to produce messenger RNA molecules from active genes—restricts the movement of DNA by organizing it into a network of interconnected domains.

Newswise: German Researchers Discover How Sleep Can Fight an Infection
6-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
German Researchers Discover How Sleep Can Fight an Infection
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered why sleep can sometimes be the best medicine. Sleep improves the potential ability of some of the body’s immune cells to attach to their targets, according to a new study that will be published February 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The study, led by Stoyan Dimitrov and Luciana Besedovsky at the University of Tübingen, helps explain how sleep can fight off an infection, whereas other conditions, such as chronic stress, can make the body more susceptible to illness.

Newswise: Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer
4-Feb-2019 9:35 AM EST
Researchers develop human cell-based model to study small cell lung cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine have used human embryonic stem cells to create a new model system that allows them to study the initiation and progression of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The study, which will be published February 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals the distinct roles played by two critical tumor suppressor genes that are commonly mutated in these highly lethal cancers.

Newswise: Study Suggests Aspirin May Help Some Patients Survive Head and Neck Cancer
22-Jan-2019 9:50 AM EST
Study Suggests Aspirin May Help Some Patients Survive Head and Neck Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Regular use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may help some patients with head and neck cancer survive the disease, according to a study led by Professor Jennifer Grandis at the University of California, San Francisco. The study, which will be published January 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, indicates that NSAIDs are effective in patients with mutations in a gene called PIK3CA, likely by lowering the levels of an inflammatory molecule called prostaglandin E2.

Newswise: Anti-flu antibodies can inhibit two different viral proteins, NIH study reveals
22-Jan-2019 2:05 PM EST
Anti-flu antibodies can inhibit two different viral proteins, NIH study reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have discovered that antibodies that may form the basis of a universal flu vaccine inhibit a second viral protein in addition to the one that they bind. The study, to be published January 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that antibodies that recognize the viral surface protein hemagglutinin can also inhibit the viral neuraminidase, and that this enhances antibody neutralization of the virus and the activation of innate immune cells with anti-viral activity.

Newswise: Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer’s disease, say USC researchers
8-Jan-2019 9:45 AM EST
Stroke drug may also prevent Alzheimer’s disease, say USC researchers
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the University of Southern California have discovered that a drug currently being developed to treat stroke patients could also prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The study, which will be published January 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the genetically engineered protein 3K3A-APC protects the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms, reducing the buildup of toxic peptides and preventing memory loss.

Newswise: Diabetes drug could be used to treat common heart failure syndrome, study suggests
Released: 19-Dec-2018 9:05 AM EST
Diabetes drug could be used to treat common heart failure syndrome, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Arizona have discovered that metformin, a drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes, might also be used to treat heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a condition that is predicted to affect over 8% of people ages 65 or older by the year 2020. The study, which was published December 19 in the Journal of General Physiology, shows that metformin relaxes a key heart muscle protein called titin, allowing the heart to properly fill with blood before pumping it around the body.

Newswise: DNA “Webs” Aid Ovarian Cancer Metastasis, Study Reveals
12-Dec-2018 10:05 AM EST
DNA “Webs” Aid Ovarian Cancer Metastasis, Study Reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that ovarian cancer cells spread, or metastasize, to new tissue after being caught in DNA "webs" extruded by immune cells. The study, which will be published December 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that preventing immune cells from forming these webs reduces metastasis in mice, suggesting that similar treatments could be used to limit the spread of ovarian cancer in humans.

Newswise: Breast Cancers Enhance Their Growth by Recruiting Cells From Bone Marrow
15-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EST
Breast Cancers Enhance Their Growth by Recruiting Cells From Bone Marrow
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Israel have discovered that breast tumors can boost their growth by recruiting stromal cells originally formed in the bone marrow. The study, which will be published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the recruitment of bone marrow–derived fibroblasts lowers the odds of surviving breast cancer, but suggests that targeting these cells could be an effective way of treating the disease.

Newswise: Researchers Describe Novel Immune Syndrome
15-Oct-2018 9:45 AM EDT
Researchers Describe Novel Immune Syndrome
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Australia and Japan have discovered a new human immunodeficiency syndrome in two patients on separate continents. The study, which will be published October 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that a mutation in a gene called IKBKB disrupts the immune system, leading to excessive inflammation and the loss of both T and B white blood cells.

Newswise: T Cells in the Urine of Bladder Cancer Patients Reflect Tumor Environment
Released: 26-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT
T Cells in the Urine of Bladder Cancer Patients Reflect Tumor Environment
The Rockefeller University Press

Scientists in the UK have shown for the first time that immune cells in the urine of bladder cancer patients accurately reflect those in the tumor environment, according to the study “Urine-derived lymphocytes as a non-invasive measure of the bladder tumor immune microenvironment,” by Wong et al., published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

Newswise: Hypertension Drugs Could Prevent Memory Loss in Lupus Patients, Study Suggests
4-Sep-2018 8:05 AM EDT
Hypertension Drugs Could Prevent Memory Loss in Lupus Patients, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered that the activation of brain cells called microglia likely contributes to the memory loss and other cognitive impairments suffered by many patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The study, which will be published September 5 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that ACE inhibitors—a class of drugs commonly used to treat hypertension—can block this process in mice and might therefore be used to preserve the memory of lupus patients.

Newswise: Researchers Identify New Potential Biotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease
22-Aug-2018 9:50 AM EDT
Researchers Identify New Potential Biotherapy for Alzheimer’s Disease
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Florida have discovered that a modified version of an important immune cell protein could be used to treat Alzheimer’s disease. The study, which will be published August 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that soluble versions of a protein called TLR5 can reduce the buildup of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease model mice and prevent the toxic peptide that forms these plaques from killing neurons.

Newswise: Researchers develop “cytological ruler” to build 3D map of human genome
22-Aug-2018 9:45 AM EDT
Researchers develop “cytological ruler” to build 3D map of human genome
The Rockefeller University Press

It has been almost 20 years since the human genome was first sequenced, but researchers still know little about how the genome is folded up and organized within cells. In a paper to be published August 28 in the Journal of Cell Biology, researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign describe a new technique that can measure the position of every single gene in the nucleus to build a 3D picture of the genome’s organization.

Newswise: Host Antibodies Shape Gut Microbiome by Changing Bacteria Gene Expression
17-Jul-2018 10:50 AM EDT
Host Antibodies Shape Gut Microbiome by Changing Bacteria Gene Expression
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science in Japan have discovered how antibodies secreted in the gut promote the growth of beneficial bacteria. Their study, which will be published July 24 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies can alter the expression of bacterial genes, allowing different bacterial species to cooperate with each other and form a community that can protect the body from disease.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Growth Signals Are Enhanced by a Protein Outside Cells
28-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Growth Signals Are Enhanced by a Protein Outside Cells
The Rockefeller University Press

New research uncovers how a sticky protein called fibronectin promotes the activity of estrogen in breast cancer cells. The study, “Fibronectin rescues estrogen receptor α from lysosomal degradation in breast cancer cells,” will be published July 6 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB).

Newswise: Researchers Identify Brain Cells Responsible for Removing Damaged Neurons After Injury
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers Identify Brain Cells Responsible for Removing Damaged Neurons After Injury
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study, which will be published June 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighboring neurons and causing more extensive neurodegeneration.

Newswise: Researchers Uncover New Target to Stop Cancer Growth
18-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT
Researchers Uncover New Target to Stop Cancer Growth
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered that a protein called Munc13-4 helps cancer cells secrete large numbers of exosomes—tiny, membrane-bound packages containing proteins and RNAs that stimulate tumor progression. The study, which will be published June 21 in the Journal of Cell Biology, could lead to new therapies that stop tumor growth and metastasis by halting exosome production.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Could Be Prevented by Targeting Epigenetic Proteins, Study Suggests
12-Jun-2018 11:25 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Could Be Prevented by Targeting Epigenetic Proteins, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto have discovered that epigenetic proteins promote the proliferation of mammary gland stem cells in response to the sex hormone progesterone. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that inhibiting these proteins with drugs could prevent the development of breast cancer in women at high risk of the disease.

Newswise:Video Embedded cells-can-trap-viruses-in-protein-cage-to-stop-their-spread,-study-reveals
VIDEO
13-Jun-2018 9:40 AM EDT
Cells can trap viruses in protein cage to stop their spread, study reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Francis Crick Institute in London have discovered that cells can trap viruses in a protein cage to stop them from spreading to neighboring cells. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the vaccinia virus can escape this trap by recruiting additional proteins to dismantle the cage and propel the virus out of the cell.

14-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
Cardiomyopathy Mutation Reduces Heart’s Ability to Vary Pumping Force, Study Reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from Washington State University have discovered how a genetic mutation linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy disrupts the heart’s normal function. The study, which will be published May 18 in the Journal of General Physiology, reveals that the mutation prevents the heart from increasing the amount of force it produces when it needs to pump additional blood around the body.

Newswise: Single Surface Protein Boosts Multiple Oncogenic Pathways in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Study Reveals
14-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
Single Surface Protein Boosts Multiple Oncogenic Pathways in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Study Reveals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study, which will be published May 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers.

Newswise: Cell Type Switch Helps Colon Cancer Evade Treatment, Study Suggests
9-May-2018 9:05 AM EDT
Cell Type Switch Helps Colon Cancer Evade Treatment, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at treating colorectal cancer, the third highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States.

Newswise: Amplification of Key Cellular Organizer May Initiate Cancer, Study Suggests
2-May-2018 10:10 AM EDT
Amplification of Key Cellular Organizer May Initiate Cancer, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes—organelles that play a vital role during cell division—before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett’s esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers.

Newswise: Osteoporosis Drug Could Be Used to Treat Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer, Researchers Say
30-Apr-2018 9:40 AM EDT
Osteoporosis Drug Could Be Used to Treat Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer, Researchers Say
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered that an enzyme called UGT8 drives the progression of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is largely untreatable. But the study, which will be published May 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the widely used osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid inhibits UGT8 and prevents the spread of basal-like breast cancer in mice, suggesting that this drug could also be used to treat the disease in humans.

Newswise: Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment, Researchers Suggest
23-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment, Researchers Suggest
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors.

Released: 3-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
Not-for-Profit Publishers Partner to Launch New Research Journal Life Science Alliance
The Rockefeller University Press

Rockefeller University Press, EMBO Press, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press today announced the launch of Life Science Alliance, a new global, open access, editorially independent, peer-reviewed journal committed to rapid, fair and transparent publication of valuable research from across the life sciences.


Showing results

150 of 221

close
0.56647