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This news release is embargoed until 19-Aug-2022 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 12-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT

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Newswise: Stanford Cancer Team Halts Growth of Multiple Myeloma and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in Mice with Custom Molecule sBCMA-Fc V3
20-Jul-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Stanford Cancer Team Halts Growth of Multiple Myeloma and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma in Mice with Custom Molecule sBCMA-Fc V3
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Stanford University have developed “decoy receptor” molecules that inhibit the growth of both multiple myeloma (MM) and diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in mice. The molecules, described in a study to be published July 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), were also found to be nontoxic in monkeys, suggesting they could be used to treat humans with either of these deadly diseases, which are two of the most common blood cancers around the world.

Newswise: Broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide immunity against SARS-CoV-2 variants
Released: 15-Jun-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Broadly neutralizing antibodies could provide immunity against SARS-CoV-2 variants
The Rockefeller University Press

Two broadly neutralizing antibodies show great promise to provide long-acting immunity against COVID-19 in immunocompromised populations according to a paper published June 15 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The antibodies were effective against all SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern tested and could be used alone or in an antibody cocktail to diminish the risk of infection.

Newswise: Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
15-Mar-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Discovery of an 'Eat-Me' signal involved in synaptic pruning and maturation of new neurons in the adult brain
The Rockefeller University Press

A research group led by Kazunobu Sawamoto, a professor at Nagoya City University and National Institute for Physiological Sciences, and Chihiro Kurematsu, a student at Nagoya City University School of Medicine, has elucidated the mechanism that controls synaptic pruning of new neurons in the adult brain. These findings are expected to be useful in the study of neurological diseases with abnormalities in microglia and synapses, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

   
Newswise: Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
3-Mar-2022 10:30 AM EST
Cancer cell's iron addiction may enable specific drug targeting, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), have discovered that cells carrying the most common mutation found in human cancer accumulate large amounts of ferrous iron and that this “ferroaddiction” can be exploited to specifically deliver powerful anticancer drugs without harming normal, healthy cells. The therapeutic strategy, described in a study to be published March 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could be used to treat a wide variety of cancers driven by mutations in the KRAS gene.

Newswise: Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
19-Jan-2022 11:05 AM EST
Cancer drug shows promise in treating infants with rare disease that causes tissue overgrowth
The Rockefeller University Press

PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) is a group of rare, incurable disorders caused by mutations in the PIK3CA gene that result in the malformation and overgrowth of various parts of the body. A new report to be published January 26 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) describes the successful treatment of two young infants with PROS using the breast cancer drug alpelisib.

Newswise: Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
Released: 1-Dec-2021 10:25 AM EST
Fast-tracked stroke drug for humans shows promise, in mice, that it might also prove a powerful tool against dementia
The Rockefeller University Press

USC study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine shows that experimental drug protects against injury caused by tiny blood clots in the brain’s white matter, which can accumulate over time and lead to cognitive decline

Newswise: RG_RUP.jpg?versionId=4370
Released: 23-Nov-2021 11:00 AM EST
Open access content from Rockefeller University Press now available on ResearchGate
The Rockefeller University Press

ResearchGate and Rockefeller University Press (RUP) today announced the completion of the first phase of a content syndication pilot partnership. ResearchGate users can now find full-text Immediate OA articles and a subset of five years of archival content published in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) between May 2016 and April 2021 on the network — approximately 2,800 articles in total.

Newswise: By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
Released: 23-Nov-2021 10:00 AM EST
By putting cancer cells to sleep, new drug could prevent tumor metastasis
The Rockefeller University Press

A new therapeutic approach prevents the growth of metastatic tumors in mice by forcing cancer cells into a dormant state in which they are unable to proliferate. The study, published November 23 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments that prevent the recurrence or spread of various cancer types, including breast cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

Newswise: ynews-slr14.png?itok=yH97eWuD&c=a75e254fe1da31f2732f6b0d7bce1413
Released: 10-Nov-2021 10:30 AM EST
Yale researchers develop RNA-based therapy that clears SARS-CoV-2 from mice
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body’s early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), could lead to new treatments for COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, as well as providing an inexpensive therapeutic option for developing countries that currently lack access to vaccines.

Newswise: Journal of Experimental Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Collaborate on New CME opportunities
Released: 28-Oct-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Journal of Experimental Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Collaborate on New CME opportunities
The Rockefeller University Press

Journal of Experimental Medicine is now presenting opportunities to engage in Continuing Medical Education (CME) in collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Each Journal-Based CME activity consists of a full-text article that is free to read, a multiple-choice question test, and an evaluation/self-assessment.

   
Newswise: Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
6-Oct-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Researchers demonstrate vaccination approach in mice that could prevent future coronavirus outbreaks
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have developed a vaccination strategy in mice that promotes the production of antibodies that can neutralize not only SARS-CoV-2 but a broad range of other coronaviruses as well. If successfully translated to humans, the approach, to be published October 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could lead to the development of a next-generation vaccine capable of preventing future coronavirus pandemics.

Newswise: VIVA and Rockefeller University Press Establish Read-and-Publish Agreement
Released: 7-Oct-2021 10:00 AM EDT
VIVA and Rockefeller University Press Establish Read-and-Publish Agreement
The Rockefeller University Press

Virginia’s academic library consortium, VIVA, and Rockefeller University Press (RUP) have entered into a Read-and-Publish Agreement. This agreement is the first of its kind for RUP in the United States and represents an important milestone in its transition to being fully Open Access. It offers a sustainable framework and provides unlimited access to all content and unlimited immediate open access publishing.

Released: 27-Sep-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Rockefeller University Press Secures Transformative Journal Status from cOAlition S
The Rockefeller University Press

Rockefeller University Press (RUP) has attained Plan S compliant Transformative Journal status from cOAlition S. Authors receiving funding from members of cOAlition S may be eligible to have their Immediate Open Access (OA) fees covered in Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP).

Released: 19-Aug-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Rockefeller University Press Announces Free Read-and-Publish for Developing Countries
The Rockefeller University Press

To address equity in Open Access publishing and promote important global research, publication fees for Immediate Open Access under CC-BY license in Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) are automatically waived for corresponding authors based in eligible developing countries. This includes deposit in PubMed Central (PMC) and archive in LOCKSS/CLOCKSS and Portico.

29-Jul-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Toxin Sponges May Protect Poisonous Frogs and Birds From Their Own Poisons, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

A team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Stanford University, and the California Academy of Sciences (CAS) has uncovered new clues as to how poisonous frogs and birds avoid intoxicating themselves.

28-Jul-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Researchers Link Neurodegenerative Disease Protein to Defective Cholesterol Metabolism
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Singapore have discovered that brain cells cannot maintain the cholesterol-rich myelin sheath that protects and insulates neurons in the absence of a protein called TDP-43. The study, which will be published August 4 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that restoring cholesterol levels could be a new therapeutic approach for diseases associated with TDP-43, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

14-Jul-2021 10:15 AM EDT
Researchers Reverse Emphysema in Mice by Injecting Blood Vessel Wall Cells
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian in New York have discovered that injecting mice with pulmonary endothelial cells—the cells that line the walls of blood vessels in the lung—can reverse the symptoms of emphysema. The study, which will be published July 21 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may lead to new treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an inflammatory lung disease associated with smoking that is thought to be the third leading cause of death worldwide.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Rockefeller University Press Journals Release Policy on Author Name Change After Publication
The Rockefeller University Press

Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and Journal of General Physiology (JGP) announce an editorial policy allowing swift and confidential updates to author names at any time and for any reason including changes to gender identity, marriage, divorce, religion, or other personal circumstances.

29-Mar-2021 9:15 AM EDT
Targeting microRNAs could unmask hidden vulnerability in breast cancer stem cells
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Italy have identified a pair of microRNA molecules that help maintain a population of cancerous stem cells that drive the growth of breast cancers and initiate tumor relapse after treatment. The study, which will be published April 2 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), reveals that targeting these microRNAs makes cancer stem cells more susceptible to some chemotherapies and could potentially improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive forms of breast cancer.

29-Mar-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Therapeutic resistance linked to softer tissue environment in breast cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, have discovered that aggressive, triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) can evade treatment by reorganizing and softening the collagen matrix that surrounds the cancer cells. The study, which will be published April 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that the softer matrix activates a signaling pathway that promotes the cancer cells’ survival, and suggests that targeting this pathway could enhance the effectiveness of chemo- and radiotherapy in TNBC patients.

3-Mar-2021 9:45 AM EST
Targeting mechanosensitive protein could treat pulmonary fibrosis, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have identified a new molecular target that could potentially treat the deadly, aging-related lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The study, which will be published March 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting a protein called MDM4 could prevent respiratory failure by initiating a genetic program that removes scar tissue from the lungs.

23-Feb-2021 8:55 AM EST
Potential drug for Alzheimer’s disease prevention shown to be safe and effective in animals
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a new drug that could prevent Alzheimer’s disease by modulating, rather than inhibiting, a key enzyme involved in forming amyloid plaques in the brain. The study, which will be published March 2 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), demonstrates that the drug is safe and effective in rodents and monkeys, paving the way for future clinical trials in humans.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EST
Balanced T cell response key to avoiding COVID-19 symptoms, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

By analyzing blood samples from individuals infected with SARS-CoV-2, researchers in Singapore have begun to unpack the different responses by the body’s T cells that determine whether or not an individual develops COVID-19. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that clearing the virus without developing symptoms requires T cells to mount an efficient immune response that produces a careful balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules.

7-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35’s activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer.

12-Jan-2021 1:05 PM EST
Max Planck Society, Rockefeller University Press Enter “Read-and-Publish” Transformative Agreement
The Rockefeller University Press

Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) has signed an unlimited “read-and-publish” transformative agreement with Rockefeller University Press (RUP) on behalf of the Max Planck Society. The agreement covers Open Access (OA) publishing of articles in RUP’s three hybrid journals: Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) and Journal of General Physiology (JGP).

Released: 12-Jan-2021 10:05 AM EST
SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates
The Rockefeller University Press

Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus’s effects on brain cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may help researchers develop treatments for the various neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19.

22-Dec-2020 1:35 PM EST
Combined approach could boost breast cancer immunotherapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Activating an immune signaling pathway best known for fighting viral and bacterial infections can boost the ability of genetically engineered T cells to eradicate breast cancer in mice, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina. The study, to be published December 31 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that CAR T cells, which are already used to treat certain blood cancers in humans, may also be successful against solid tumors if combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches.

2-Dec-2020 9:50 AM EST
Targeting T cell protein could prevent type 1 diabetes, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine have identified a new therapeutic target to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. The study, which will be published December 9 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), reveals that inhibiting a protein called OCA-B protects mice from type 1 diabetes by limiting the activity of immune cells that would otherwise destroy the pancreas’ insulin-producing β cells.

Released: 19-Nov-2020 10:45 AM EST
Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19, according to new study
The Rockefeller University Press

Pairs of antibodies may be more effective than single antibodies at preventing and treating COVID-19, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Rockefeller University in New York. The study, published November 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that in addition to blocking SARS-CoV-2’s entry into cells, the antibodies may combat the virus by enlisting various types of white blood cells to fight the infection.

22-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Acid Reflux Drug Could Help Newborn Babies Recover From Brain Injury, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered a potential way to prevent a lack of oxygen or blood flow from causing long-lasting brain damage in newborn children. The study, which will be published September 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting the histamine H2 receptor with drugs already used to treat acid reflux in infants could help newborns recover from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), a condition that affects over 1 in 1,000 live births and can cause life-long neurological disabilities.

Released: 14-Sep-2020 10:10 AM EDT
DNA webs may drive lung pathology in severe COVID-19
The Rockefeller University Press

Sticky webs of DNA released from immune cells known as neutrophils may cause much of the tissue damage associated with severe COVID-19 infections, according to two new studies published September 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). The research, conducted by independent groups in Belgium and Brazil, suggests that blocking the release of these DNA webs could be a new therapeutic target for the management of severe forms of COVID-19.

Released: 4-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Unconventional T cells in severe COVID-19 patients could predict disease outcome
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in France have discovered that patients suffering from severe COVID-19 show changes in a class of immune cells known as unconventional T cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that monitoring the activity of these cells in the blood of patients could predict the severity and course of the disease.

20-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Researchers identify RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells evade immune system
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Spain have identified a non-coding RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells proliferate and avoid being killed by the body’s immune cells. The study, which will be published August 27 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that targeting this RNA molecule could boost the effectiveness of immunotherapies that are currently only successful in ~20% of lung cancer patients.

20-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer cells’ immune evasion
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered how brain cancer cells increase production of a key protein that allows them to evade the body’s immune system. The study, which will be published August 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting this cellular pathway could help treat the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, as well as other cancers that are resistant to current forms of immunotherapy.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

28-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Researchers make significant step toward blood test for Alzheimer’s disease
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a technique to detect minute amounts of a protein fragment linked to Alzheimer’s disease in the blood. The study, which will be published July 28 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), shows that levels of p-tau-217 are elevated during the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease and could lead to a simple blood test capable of diagnosing the neurodegenerative disorder years before any symptoms begin to appear.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Researchers develop new tools to rapidly test activity of anti-coronavirus antibodies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York have developed new tools to rapidly test the ability of antibodies to neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The approach, described today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), will help researchers understand whether patients are susceptible to reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 and assess the effectiveness of experimental vaccines, as well as develop antibody-based therapies against the disease.

6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Turn Killer Immune Cells Into Allies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients.

16-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Early clinical trial supports tumor cell–based vaccine for mantle cell lymphoma
The Rockefeller University Press

A phase I/II clinical trial by researchers at Stanford University suggests that vaccines prepared from a patient’s own tumor cells may prevent the incurable blood cancer mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) from returning after treatment. The study, which will be published June 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), reveals that the vaccines are a safe and effective way to induce the body’s immune system to attack any tumor cells that could cause disease relapse.

1-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Continued nicotine use promotes brain tumors in lung cancer patients, Wake Forest study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have discovered that nicotine promotes the spread of lung cancer cells into the brain, where they can form deadly metastatic tumors. The study, which will be published June 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that nicotine replacement therapies may not be suitable strategies for lung cancer patients attempting to quit smoking. In addition, the researchers show that the naturally occurring drug parthenolide blocks nicotine-induced brain metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential therapeutic option in humans.

19-May-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Researchers identify therapeutic targets to prevent cancer-associated muscle loss
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center have identified a key cell signaling pathway that drives the devastating muscle loss, or cachexia, suffered by many cancer patients. The study, which will be published May 22 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this pathway with a drug already in phase 2 clinical trials for diabetes could prevent this syndrome.

4-May-2020 10:00 AM EDT
How herpes simplex virus can evade the immune response to infect the brain
The Rockefeller University Press

A research team has discovered a molecular mechanism that helps Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) evade the innate immune system and infect the brain causing a rare disease with high mortality. The study from Aarhus University, University of Oxford, and University of Gothenburg, led by first author Chiranjeevi Bodda in Søren Paludan’s lab, will be published May 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM).

2-Mar-2020 8:45 AM EST
Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Chicago have discovered that bacteria that usually live in the gut can accumulate in tumors and improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in mice. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that treating cancer patients with Bifidobacteria might boost their response to CD47 immunotherapy, a wide-ranging anti-cancer treatment that is currently being evaluated in several clinical trials.

18-Feb-2020 4:05 PM EST
Rockefeller University Press (RUP) signs Jisc transitional open access agreement for UK higher education
The Rockefeller University Press

Nonprofit publisher Rockefeller University Press (RUP), a department of The Rockefeller University in New York City, has agreed to a deal with Jisc that negotiates open access (OA) agreements with publishers on behalf of all UK universities. RUP is the first US–based university press to sign a transitional agreement with research and education not-for-profit Jisc. The unlimited “read-and-publish” transitional agreement covers RUP’s three hybrid journals, Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM) and Journal of General Physiology (JGP).

10-Feb-2020 9:55 AM EST
Researchers discover how cells clear misfolded proteins from tissues
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have identified a new quality control system that allows cells to remove damaged and potentially toxic proteins from their surroundings. The study, which will be published February 18 in the Journal of Cell Biology, finds that the Clusterin protein and heparan sulfate proteoglycans combine to bring misfolded proteins into cells for degradation. The findings may lead to new therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease.

   
29-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Activating Immune Cells Could Revitalize the Aging Brain, Study Suggests
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Albany Medical College in New York have discovered that a specific type of immune cell accumulates in older brains, and that activating these cells improves the memory of aged mice. The study, which will be published February 5 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting these cells might reduce age-related cognitive decline and combat aging-associated neurodegenerative disease in humans.

   
19-Dec-2019 8:05 AM EST
Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Toronto have identified a key protein that supports the growth of many colorectal cancers. The study, which will be published December 27 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that a protein called Importin-11 transports the cancer-causing protein βcatenin into the nucleus of colon cancer cells, where it can drive cell proliferation. Inhibiting this transport step could block the growth of most colorectal cancers caused by elevated βcatenin levels.

16-Dec-2019 10:15 AM EST
Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published December 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat patients infected with Zika or similar viral pathogens, such as the yellow fever and dengue viruses.

   
7-Nov-2019 12:00 PM EST
Researchers discover a new way in which insulin interacts with its receptor
The Rockefeller University Press

The biological actions of insulin are mediated by its receptor—the insulin receptor—which is localized on the cell surface. In a new study, researchers from Germany, Canada, and Finland show how insulin interacts with its receptor at a second binding site. The scientists hope that these new details concerning insulin–receptor interactions will ultimately expand the current models of insulin binding to its receptor and pave the way towards new approaches to structure-based drug design.


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