Newswise — During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, there were few treatment options available. This led many to consider alternative medicines and herbal remedies to treat or prevent COVID-19. Supplementation with green tea extract was considered by some to be potentially beneficial because of its antioxidant content and history of use as an herbal remedy. 

Two Harrisburg University of Science and Technology alumni and a professor examined the evidence that exists regarding the therapeutic efficacy of green tea extracts as an anti-infective.  The study results indicate that currently, there is no conclusive evidence that green tea extract is appropriate to treat any infectious disease (including COVID-19). There were documented instances that show green tea extracts having some side effects and interactions at high doses with select prescription medications. Based on this, it is best to enjoy green tea as a beverage rather than use it as a medicine.

  The findings of the study are published in a peer-reviewed article in the Journal “Current Nutriceuticals”. The title of the article is titled “Anti-infective and Antineoplastic properties of Green Tea Catechins: Examining the Therapeutic Risk-Benefit ratio” The abstract is available here à   Anti-infective and Antineoplastic properties of Green Tea Catechins: Examining the Therapeutic Risk-Benefit ratio | Bentham Science (eurekaselect.com). Luciene De Paula Mendes (the first author of the manuscript) received her MS degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Sharif Beyah received his MS in Biotechnology, both at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology.  Dr. Erik Hefti, Executive Director of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Harrisburg University, is the third author.

 

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