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Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
24-Jan-2020 9:55 AM EST

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Rising from the ashes: volunteers and good science will be vital to bush recovery after catastrophic fires

University of South Australia

University of South Australia ecologist Joan Gibbs describes the day that fires tore through her property in the Adelaide Hills, leaving a trail of devastation. One month on, there are signs of recovery.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, Wildfires,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
Research Results
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FSU Research: Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit

Florida State University

Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to Florida State University researchers.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Plants, Pollution, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Feature
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Caterpillar loss in tropical forest linked to extreme rain, temperature events

University of Nevada, Reno

Using a 22-year dataset of plant-caterpillar-parasitoid interactions collected within a patch of protected Costa Rican lowland Caribbean forest, scientists report declines in caterpillar and parasitoid diversity and density that are paralleled by losses in an important ecosystem service: biocontrol of herbivores by parasitoids.

Channels: Agriculture, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:20 PM EST
Research Results

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses

Cornell University

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate.

Channels: Agriculture, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Food Science, Genetics, Plants, Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 10:15 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why

University of Washington

Scientists have identified the chemical cues in flowers that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell and draw them in. Their findings show how cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — information that could help develop less toxic repellents and better traps.

Channels: Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
Research Results
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Insecticides are becoming more toxic to honey bees

Newswise Review

During the past 20 years, insecticides applied to U.S. agricultural landscapes have become significantly more toxic -- over 120-fold in some midwestern states -- to honey bees when ingested, according to a team of researchers, who identified rising neonicotinoid seed treatments in corn and soy as the primary driver of this change.

Channels: Agriculture, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, Scientific Reports, All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 12:15 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: AgriLife Research Develops Tropical Hibiscus Hybrids Ready for Market

AgriLife Research Develops Tropical Hibiscus Hybrids Ready for Market

Texas A&M AgriLife

Winter-hardy hibiscus cultivars are what initially attracted Dariusz Malinowski, Ph.D., Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant physiologist and breeder, to the world of flowers, but now he’s ready to splash a little tropical color into the market.

Channels: Agriculture, Environmental Science, Nature, Plants, All Journal News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 3:50 PM EST
Research Results


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