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Soil Carbon Sinks, Coral Adaptation, Earth's Oxygen History, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

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Plant Sciences, green fuel production, mass spectometry, photosystem II, Cyanobacteria

Water World

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Following the paths of radicals and finding many damaged residues because of incredibly accurate, fast and sensitive mass spectrometry, three Washington University scientists studied the great granddaddy of all photosynthetic organisms — a strain of cyanobacteria — to develop the first experimental map of that organism’s water world.

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Emsl, Cellulose, Spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, scientific reports, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Washington State University, WSU, Biofuel, Biofuel Production, Biofuels, Renewable Energy, renewable energy development, Plants, Plant, Plant Cell Walls, plant

Unplugging the Cellulose Biofuel Bottleneck

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Molecular-level understanding of cellulose structure reveals why it resists degradation and could lead to cost-effective biofuels.

Science

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Water Quality Research, Phosphates, Nitrates, Heavy Metals, Duckweed, Upper Big Sioux River Watershed Project, U.S. Geological Survey, South Dakota Water Resources Institute, South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station

Aquatic Plant May Help Remove Contaminants From Lakes

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A tiny aquatic plant called duckweed might be a viable option for remove phosphorus, nitrates, nitrites and even heavy metals from lakes, ponds and slow-moving waterbodies.

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Joint Genome Institute, JGI, Emsl, Enzyme, Enzymes, enzymes for biofuels, Biofuels, Biofuel, Biofuel Production, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Nature Microbiology, Fungus, Fungi, Genomics, Genetics, genetic, Microbiology, University of California at Santa Barbara, Uni

How Fungal Enzymes Break Down Plant Cell Walls

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Lignocellulose-degrading enzyme complexes could improve biofuel production.

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Florida First Detectors Help ID Invasive Plant Pests Before They Spread

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Florida has the most invasive species of any state in the country, and half of the insects, reptiles, arachnids and crustaceans imported into the United States come through Florida ports, University of Florida experts say. So, UF/IFAS has teamed up with government agencies to create a program to teach the public how to identify these insects before they become prolific.

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Are Petite Poplars the Future of Biofuels? UW Studies Say Yes

A University of Washington team is trying to make poplar a viable competitor in the biofuels market by testing the production of younger poplar trees that could be harvested more frequently — after only two or three years — instead of the usual 10- to 20-year cycle.

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intercropping, Sorgh, Groundnut, Sahel, Fertilizer, international agriculture

Filling Intercropping Info Gap

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In some parts of Africa, farmers intercrop sorghum – a grain – and peanuts. But they face a major information gap. There hasn’t been much research on optimal levels of fertilizer use for intercropping sorghum and peanuts in these areas. A new study has filled this information gap. Researchers from Niger, Mali, and the United States have developed a method to help farmers determine how much fertilizer to apply when intercropping.

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Rain, Raindrops, Pathogens, Crops, Dispersal, splash, Grain, Wheat, Plants, Seungho Kim, Hope Gruszewski, Todd Gidley, David G. Schmale III, Sunghwan Jung, Virginia Tech, Division of Fluid Dynamics, Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS, DFD

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Nov-2017 8:00 AM EST

Science

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CORN, Maize, Crops, Agronomy, Plant Breeding, Food, Agriculture

Breeding Highly Productive Corn Has Reduced Its Ability to Adapt

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Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions.







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