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Science

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Evolution, Paleontology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2018 7:05 PM EST

Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Electrophysiology, Cardiovacular Disease, Afib, Atrial fibrilation, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

African Americans with Atrial Fibrillation at Significantly Higher Risk for Stroke Compared to Caucasians with the Disease

African Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) – a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications – have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The new findings build on previous studies examining the impact of race on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), which is linked to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other complications. It’s well reported that African Americans have a lower risk of developing AF as compared to Caucasians, but until now, there was little data on the additional risks that come with AF for each race.

Science

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Astronomy, Supernova, Dark Energy Survey

Astronomers Reveal Secrets of Most Distant Supernova Ever Detected

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An international team of astronomers led by the University of Southampton has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected – a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.

Medicine

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Cancer, Immuno-therapy, Breast Cancer, Melanoma, Biomedical Engineering

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2018 2:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Amyloid Plaques, Bace1, Neurodegenative Disease

Researchers Successfully Reverse Alzheimer’s Disease in Mouse Model

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A team of researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease, thereby improving the animals’ cognitive function. The study, which will be published February 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that drugs targeting this enzyme will be able to successfully treat Alzheimer’s disease in humans.

Medicine

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long coding RNAs, selfish genes, Vascular Disease, Heart Disease, Nature Medicine, Cholesterol

Newly Discovered Gene May Protect Against Heart Disease

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Scientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, asparagine, triple-negative breast cancer cells, Her2

Diet May Influence the Spread of a Deadly Type of Breast Cancer, Study Finds

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A single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study published today in the medical journal Nature. Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cancer to travel to distant sites in the body. Among other techniques, the team used dietary restrictions to limit asparagine.

Science

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Ecosystems, Biological Sciences, Biology, Nature, Ecology, Organisms, Mutualism, mutualistic relationships, Africa, african savanna, Elephants, Trees, Insects, whistling thorn acacia tree, scale insects, keystone interaction, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton

Even Small Changes Within an Ecosystem Can Have Detrimental Effects

A mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants.

Medicine

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Cancer, Biotech, clinical plasma , Plasma, liquid biopsies, liquid biopsy, Liquid Biopsy for Cancer

Pre-Clinical Research Aided by Customized Collection Capabilities

Conversant Bio™ has partnered with Streck to provide cancer researchers with customized clinical plasma samples that are research-ready, allowing researchers to focus on their studies and not their sample collection processing and logistics.

Science

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Global Warming, carbon dioxide emissions, Oceanography

Coastal Water Absorbing More Carbon Dioxide

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New research by the University of Delaware and other institutions reveals that water over continental shelves is shouldering more atmospheric carbon dioxide, which may have implications for scientists studying how much carbon dioxide can be released into the atmosphere while keeping warming limited.







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