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Newswise: How Information Is Like Snacks, Money, and Drugs—to Your Brain

Article ID: 714644

How Information Is Like Snacks, Money, and Drugs—to Your Brain

University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

A new study by researchers at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business has found that information acts on the brain's dopamine-producing reward system in the same way as money or food.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 3:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2019 6:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 712569

New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks

Johns Hopkins University

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

Released:
8-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Newswise: A Small Dinosaur from New Mexico is a Big Piece in the Puzzle of Tyrannosaur Evolution
  • Embargo expired:
    6-May-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712293

A Small Dinosaur from New Mexico is a Big Piece in the Puzzle of Tyrannosaur Evolution

Stony Brook University

Tyrannosauroid dinosaurs have a long evolutionary history and include iconic giants like Tyrannosaurus rex. Now an international research team including Alan H. Turner, PhD, from Stony Brook University, have uncovered the skeleton of a small tyrannosaur from Late Cretaceous rocks in New Mexico.

Released:
2-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Mouse Studies Show Minimally Invasive Route Can Accurately Administer Drugs to Brain
  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711911

Mouse Studies Show Minimally Invasive Route Can Accurately Administer Drugs to Brain

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed a technique that facilitates the precise placement of cancer drugs at their intended targets in the brain. This approach pairs a technique that guides a catheter through the brain’s arteries with positron emission technology (PET) scans to precisely place cancer drugs at their intended targets in the brain. If future studies show this image-guided drug delivery method is safe and effective in humans, the researchers say it could improve outcomes for historically difficult-to-treat and often lethal brain cancers, such as glioblastoma.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Searching for Lost WWII-Era Uranium Cubes from Germany
  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2019 3:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 711926

Searching for Lost WWII-Era Uranium Cubes from Germany

American Institute of Physics (AIP)

In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, “Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. Gift of Ninninger.” Koeth accepted the cube and its note as an invitation to the adventure of a lifetime. In Physics Today, Koeth and Miriam Hiebert describe what they’ve discovered while exploring the German quest and failure to build a working nuclear reactor during WWII.

Released:
26-Apr-2019 10:10 AM EDT

Article ID: 711377

Indicators of Despair Rising Among Gen X-ers Entering Middle Age

Vanderbilt University

In 2016, a surprising decline in life expectancy was ascribed to "deaths of despair" among working-class middle-aged white men displaced by a changing economy. However, new research shows indicators of despair are rising among Americans approaching middle age regardless of race, education and gender.

Released:
15-Apr-2019 4:25 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 711260

Heads in the cloud: Scientists predict internet of thoughts 'within decades'

Frontiers

Imagine a future technology that would provide instant access to the world's knowledge and artificial intelligence, simply by thinking about a specific topic or question. Communications, education, work, and the world as we know it would be transformed.

Released:
12-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Psychedelic Drug MDMA May Reawaken ‘Critical Period’ in Brain to Help Treat PTSD

Article ID: 710725

Psychedelic Drug MDMA May Reawaken ‘Critical Period’ in Brain to Help Treat PTSD

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins neuroscientists have found that the psychedelic drug MDMA reopens a kind of window, called a “critical period,” when the brain is sensitive to learning the reward value of social behaviors. The findings, reported April 3 in Nature, may explain why MDMA may be helpful in treating people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Released:
4-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: A Simple Strategy to Improve Your Mood in 12 Minutes

Article ID: 710272

A Simple Strategy to Improve Your Mood in 12 Minutes

Iowa State University

We all have a remedy – a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate – for lifting our spirits when we’re in a bad mood. Rather than focusing on ways to make ourselves feel better, a team of Iowa State University researchers suggests wishing others well.

Released:
27-Mar-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: For Infants, Distinguishing Between Friends and Strangers Is a Laughing Matter
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Mar-2019 6:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709306

For Infants, Distinguishing Between Friends and Strangers Is a Laughing Matter

New York University

Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and that between strangers, finds a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 3:15 PM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences


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