Missouri University of Science and Technology

Over the holidays, replacing the furnace filter could help protect people from COVID-19 indoors

Newswise — Amid the food, gifts and well wishes, the holidays could have a new star – a furnace filter. Until a vaccine is ready, a high-efficiency furnace filter used along with other precautions could help protect people from COVID-19 as they spend more time together indoors.

Dr. Yang Wang, assistant professor of civil, architectural and environmental engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology, is leading a team of researchers to study the particles – called bioaerosols – released by people when they speak, sing or cough. They are observing how viruses travel through the air, how time and environmental conditions affect the viability of viruses, and how proper ventilation can help control viral spread.                                             

“What we’re seeing is that particles as large as 10 microns can remain airborne for several minutes after being generated by coughing or speaking,” Wang says. “If someone has a high virus load and speaks or coughs, that’s going to generate more airborne viruses.”

Dr. Guang Xu, associate professor of mining engineering at Missouri S&T and co-investigator on the project, is an expert in ventilation. He is running simulations in the laboratory’s environmental chamber using bioaerosols that contain pathogens similar to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Another co-investigator, S&T biological sciences professor Dr. Yue Wern Huang, is providing biological analysis of the bioaerosols. The project is funded by a $330,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Wang points out that the Environmental Protection Agency recommends air filters with a rating of at least MERV 13 for homeowners who want to improve general indoor air quality. A higher MERV (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Values) rating means the filter can trap smaller particles, including viruses. Wang says that as people gather over the holidays, a portable air filter could provide additional protection, and it can be a simple do-it-yourself device. Wang says a box fan with air filters taped to the front and back can provide additional air filtration.

“In businesses, homes and schools, ventilation systems need to work well and have high-efficiency filters to help slow the spread of COVID-19,” says Wang. “But filters alone are not enough. People also need to follow the simple guidelines of wearing a mask, maintaining physical distancing and washing their hands thoroughly and often.”

About Missouri University of Science and Technology

Founded in 1870 as the University of Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy, Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) is a STEM-focused research university of over 7,600 students and part of the four-campus University of Missouri System. Located in Rolla, Missouri S&T offers 99 different degree programs in 40 areas of study, including engineering, education, the sciences, business and information technology, the humanities, and the liberal arts. Missouri S&T is known globally and is highly ranked for providing a high return on tuition investment, exceptional career opportunities for graduates, and an emphasis on applied, hands-on learning through student design teams and cooperative education and internship opportunities. For more information about Missouri S&T, visit mst.edu.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 4581
Newswise: Lockdown affords Aussie tennis players a unique advantage
Released: 18-Jan-2021 10:05 PM EST
Lockdown affords Aussie tennis players a unique advantage
University of South Australia

Australian-based tennis players may have a once-in-a-lifetime court advantage at the 2021 Australian Open as many of their international counterparts endure lockdown restrictions in Melbourne hotels.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 21-Jan-2021 12:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 18-Jan-2021 8:05 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Jan-2021 12:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 18-Jan-2021 5:05 PM EST
FLCCC Alliance issues public response to new NIH recommendation on the use of ivermectin
Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC Alliance)

The Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC) has issued a public response to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding the NIH COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel’s “neither for nor against” recommendation for the use of ivermectin in the treatment of COVID-19.

Newswise: UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Marc Suchard, of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, co-led international research team looking at two widely used types of blood pressure drugs.

Newswise: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The team, including UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professors Anne Rimoin and Christina Ramirez, found that near-universal adoption of nonmedical masks in public, combined with complementary public health measures, could successfully eliminate spread of the infection. and add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP.

Released: 18-Jan-2021 10:45 AM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Build Models Using Machine Learning Technique to Enhance Predictions of COVID-19 Outcomes
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

Newswise:Video Embedded pregnant-women-should-consider-taking-the-covid-19-vaccine
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:50 AM EST
Pregnant women should consider taking the COVID-19 vaccine.
University of Washington School of Medicine

f pregnant individuals catch COVID they will generally get sicker than non-pregnant individuals. They also more commonly end up on ECMO [heart-lung support], in the ICU or on ventilators.

Newswise: Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:40 AM EST
Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
UW Medicine

Even people who have experienced severe allergic reactions to food, latex, pets, pollen, or bee stings should get the coronavirus vaccine, UW Medicine allergy and infectious disease experts say.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:40 PM EST
Research Links Social Isolation to COVID-19 Protocol Resistance
Humboldt State University

As health officials continue to implore the public to wear masks and practice social distancing, recent research by Humboldt State University Psychology Professor Amber Gaffney provides key insights into connections between social isolation, conspiratorial thinking, and resistance to COVID-19 protocols.

Newswise: Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:35 PM EST
Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body.


Showing results

110 of 4581

close
1.16299