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    24-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

High Air Pollution Exposure in One-Year-Olds Linked to Structural Brain Changes at Age 12

Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

A new study suggests that significant early childhood exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is associated with structural changes in the brain at the age of 12. The Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study found that children with higher levels of TRAP exposure at birth had reductions at age 12 in gray matter volume and cortical thickness as compared to children with lower levels of exposure.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Cognition and Learning, Environmental Health, Neuro, Pollution, PLOS ONE,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 1:25 PM EST
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Embargo will expire:
28-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
24-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

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Research Results
Newswise: Here, There and Everywhere: Large and Giant Viruses Abound Globally

Here, There and Everywhere: Large and Giant Viruses Abound Globally

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

In Nature, a team led by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) researchers uncovered a broad diversity of large and giant viruses that belong to the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV) supergroup, expanding virus diversity in this group 10-fold from just 205 genomes.

Channels: Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome, Public Health, West Nile Virus, Zika Virus, Nature (journal), DOE Science News, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 2:25 PM EST
Research Results
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Efforts to improve vehicle fuel efficiency may come at a high cost to the climate, public health

University of Georgia

New automotive technology that promises enhanced fuel efficiency may have a serious downside, including significant climate and public health impacts, according to research from the University of Georgia College of Engineering.

Channels: Automotive, Climate Science, Engineering, Environmental Health, Pollution, Public Health, Technology, All Journal News,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 10:20 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore Lab Foundation, ClimateWorks to unveil report on California’s road to carbon neutrality

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore Lab Foundation, ClimateWorks to unveil report on California’s road to carbon neutrality

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

LLNL will host a briefing to unveil the new report “Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California,” which identifies a robust suite of technologies to help California clear the last hurdle and become carbon neutral by 2045.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Local - California,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 6:05 AM EST
Research Results
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FSU Research: Despite less ozone pollution, not all plants benefit

Florida State University

Policies and new technologies have reduced emissions of precursor gases that lead to ozone air pollution, but despite those improvements, the amount of ozone that plants are taking in has not followed the same trend, according to Florida State University researchers.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Plants, Pollution, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
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Air pollution in New York City linked to wildfires hundreds of miles away

European Geosciences Union (EGU)

A new study shows that air pollutants from the smoke of fires from as far as Canada and the southeastern U.S. traveled hundreds of miles and several days to reach Connecticut and New York City, where it caused significant increases in pollution concentrations.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Health, Pollution, Wildfires, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 12:55 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published “Viewpoint” articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans’ ability to regulate body temperature.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research Results


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