Feature Channels: Stem Cells

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Newswise: Mapping out the mystery of blood stem cells
25-Nov-2020 10:30 AM EST
Mapping out the mystery of blood stem cells
University Health Network (UHN)

Princess Margaret scientists have revealed how stem cells are able to generate new blood cells throughout our life by looking at vast, uncharted regions of our genetic material that hold important clues to subtle biological changes in these cells.

Newswise: World’s first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Released: 24-Nov-2020 7:25 AM EST
World’s first: Drug guides stem cells to desired location, improving their ability to heal
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a drug that can lure stem cells to damaged tissue and improve treatment efficacy—a scientific first and major advance for the field of regenerative medicine. The discovery, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could improve current stem cell therapies designed to treat such neurological disorders as spinal cord injury, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders; and expand their use to new conditions, such as heart disease or arthritis.

Newswise: Craig%20Jordan%20lead%20image3.png
Released: 23-Nov-2020 5:00 PM EST
CU Cancer Center Leukemia Researcher Receives NCI Outstanding Investigator Award
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Craig Jordan, PhD, has spent more than 20 years developing better treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a rapidly progressing cancer of the blood and bone marrow that can spread to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen and central nervous system.

Newswise: Three selected for ASCB's 2020 Porter Prizes for Research Excellence
Released: 17-Nov-2020 12:25 PM EST
Three selected for ASCB's 2020 Porter Prizes for Research Excellence
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The Award Selection Committee of the American Society for Cell Biology has chosen Matthew Akamatsu, the Arnold O. Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley; Gwendolyn Beacham, a PhD candidate at Cornell University; and Kate Cavanaugh, a PhD candidate from University of Chicago, as the 2020 winners of the Porter Prizes for Research Excellence. Akamatsu will receive $4,000, and Cavanaugh and Beacham will each receive $2,000. Each winner will give a talk in a Minisymposium relevant to her or his research. Also recognized as Honorable Mentions are Jui-Hsia Weng, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School; and Hawa Racine, a postdoctoral research fellow in The Cell and Developmental Biology Center at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
Released: 17-Nov-2020 11:55 AM EST
Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs.

Released: 10-Nov-2020 8:45 AM EST
Scientists speed up artificial organoid growth and selection
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

The method currently used to produce stem cell-derived tissues has a very limited throughput. By semi-automating tissue differentiation, researchers from MIPT and Harvard have made the process nearly four times faster, without compromising on quality. The new algorithm is also useful for analyzing the factors that affect cell specialization.

Newswise: Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Released: 21-Oct-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Rogel team receives $11.2M to leverage the microbiome against GVHD
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A team of researchers from the Rogel Cancer Center received an $11.2 million grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to study how to use the microbiome to limit complications of stem cell transplants for blood cancers and other diseases.

Released: 21-Oct-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Scientists identify compound that stimulates muscle cells in mice
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have identified a compound that can reproduce the effect of exercise in muscle cells in mice. The findings are published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.

Newswise: New research reveals why low oxygen damages the brain
18-Oct-2020 6:00 AM EDT
New research reveals why low oxygen damages the brain
Case Western Reserve University

Brain cell dysfunction in low oxygen is, surprisingly, caused by the very same responder system that is intended to be protective, according to a new published study by a team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Released: 15-Oct-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Agricultural Toxicity, Hepatic Effects of Phenobarbital, and More Featured in October 2020 Toxicological Sciences
Society of Toxicology

Toxicological Sciences features leading research biotransformation, toxicokinetics, and pharmacokinetics; computational toxicology and databases; mixtures toxicology; and more in the October 2020 issue.

Newswise: AAOS Advances Biologics Initiative with Innovative Dashboard
Released: 14-Oct-2020 12:55 PM EDT
AAOS Advances Biologics Initiative with Innovative Dashboard
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) continues to demonstrate its commitment to advancing the quality of musculoskeletal care in a fully transparent and scientific way. Debuting today as a new member benefit, the AAOS Biologics Dashboard is a dynamic online tool designed to help orthopaedic surgeons navigate the approval status of biologic-based interventions. The development of the AAOS Biologics Dashboard is just one of several efforts within the Academy’s Biologics Initiative that offers evidence-based guidance to the musculoskeletal health community. An additional effort is the revision of two biologics-related position statements, recently approved by the AAOS Board of Directors.

Newswise: FAU Researchers Receive $1.3 Million NIH Grant for Stem Cell Research
Released: 14-Oct-2020 8:30 AM EDT
FAU Researchers Receive $1.3 Million NIH Grant for Stem Cell Research
Florida Atlantic University

The NIH grant will enable FAU scientists to identify the gene regulation pathways activated to program immature stem-like cells of the eye lens to attain their mature form and transparent function. The research team plans to explore the genetic and cellular mechanisms controlling developmental DNA conformational changes and will identify the transcription factors needed for eye lens formation.

Newswise: Casting Call: Why Immobilizing Helps in Healing
Released: 12-Oct-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Casting Call: Why Immobilizing Helps in Healing
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Oct. 12, 2020 – By far, the most common injuries seen in emergency rooms in the United States are those affecting extremities. Immobilization is the most common treatment, and yet, until recently, it was unknown exactly why this technique worked to advance healing.

Newswise: UM171 saves another life
Released: 30-Sep-2020 6:00 AM EDT
UM171 saves another life
Universite de Montreal

Developed in Canada, the UM171 molecule was used in a blood transplant by a Montreal medical team on a young man suffering from severe aplastic anemia, an autoimmune disease.

Newswise: Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
Released: 29-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Exosome treatment improves recovery from heart attacks in a preclinical study
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Research in pigs shows that using the exosomes naturally produced from a mix of heart muscle, endothelial and smooth muscle cells — all derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells — yields regenerative benefits equivalent to the injected human induced pluripotent stem cell-cardiac cells.

Newswise:Video Embedded could-a-tiny-fish-hold-the-key-to-curing-blindness
VIDEO
Released: 25-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Could a tiny fish hold the key to curing blindness?
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Imagine this: A patient learns that they are losing their sight because an eye disease has damaged crucial cells in their retina. Then, under the care of their doctor, they simply grow some new retinal cells, restoring their vision. Although science hasn’t yet delivered this happy ending, researchers are working on it – with help from the humble zebrafish. When a zebrafish loses its retinal cells, it grows new ones. This observation has encouraged scientists to try hacking the zebrafish’s innate regenerative capacity to learn how to treat human disease. That is why among the National Eye Institute’s 1,200 active research projects, nearly 80 incorporate zebrafish.

Newswise: Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Shared protein fingerprint could simplify treatment of common inherited heart disease
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists discovered that many different genetic mutations result in surprisingly similar changes to heart muscle proteins in patients with the most severe manifestations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

Released: 22-Sep-2020 2:05 PM EDT
T Cell Therapy, Gut Microbiome, Tumorigenicity, and More Featured in September 2020 Toxicological Sciences
Society of Toxicology

Toxicological Sciences features leading research in toxicology in the areas of biomarkers, environmental toxicology, and more in the September 2020 issue.

Newswise: Where Trouble Starts
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Where Trouble Starts
University of Delaware

In the earliest hours of your embryonic status, cells were developing and multiplying, critical processes were starting up, networks were connecting and genetic codes — for better or worse — were directing the whole project. That early development is the focus of University of Delaware biologist Shuo Wei's research. Now his work has won more than $1.8 million in support from the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
Released: 3-Sep-2020 6:40 PM EDT
Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique – which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet – can be used to coax bone marrow stem cells into specialized cells.

Newswise:Video Embedded mass-eye-and-ear-doctors-collaborate-with-dana-farber-to-rebuild-damaged-corneas-using-patients-own-stem-cells-for-first-time-in-united-states
VIDEO
27-Aug-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Mass Eye and Ear Doctors Collaborate with Dana-Farber to Rebuild Damaged Corneas Using Patients’ Own Stem Cells for First Time in United States
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Surgeons at Mass Eye and Ear have replaced the ocular surface of four patients who each experienced chemical burns to one eye by using their own stem cells taken from the other healthy eye, in a technique known as “cultivated autologous limbal epithelial cell transplantation” (CALEC). These four cases, all part of an ongoing clinical trial supported by the National Eye Institute of the NIH, represent the first procedures of their kind to occur in the United States.

Released: 28-Aug-2020 6:10 PM EDT
Promising research sheds light on treating deadly bone-marrow disorder
University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers are beginning to understand more about how to treat a rare but deadly type of blood cancer known as Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Newswise: chen-george-porthole.jpg
Released: 25-Aug-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Roswell Park Study: Delaying Antiviral Treatment May Boost Immunity in Stem Cell Transplant Recipients
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Patients who develop cytomegalovirus infections after allogeneic stem cell transplantation may be able to develop an immunity against the virus, strengthen their immune system and reduce reliance on strong antiviral medications, a team from Roswell Park reports in the journal Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

Newswise: LJI team gets first-ever look at a rare but vital stem cell in humans
14-Aug-2020 5:45 PM EDT
LJI team gets first-ever look at a rare but vital stem cell in humans
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have tracked down the rare stem cells that generate neutrophils in human bone marrow. This research, published August 18, 2020, in Immunity, gives researchers a potential path for intervening in diseases where neutrophil development goes awry.

Released: 14-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
New Collection of Rett Syndrome Stem Cells Available from Coriell Institute for Medical Research
Coriell Institute for Medical Research

The Coriell Institute for Medical Research has added a new collection of stem cells to its biobank offerings. The new collection is a result of a collaboration between Coriell and the Rett Syndrome Research Trust (RSRT) and consists of 10 lines of human induced pluripotent stem cells created from blood donated by individuals with Rett syndrome.

Newswise: Implanted Neural Stem Cell Grafts Show Functionality in Spinal Cord Injuries
Released: 5-Aug-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Implanted Neural Stem Cell Grafts Show Functionality in Spinal Cord Injuries
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report successfully implanting specialized grafts of neural stem cells directly into spinal cord injuries in mice, then documenting how the grafts grew and filled the injury sites, mimicking the animals’ existing neuronal network.

Released: 30-Jul-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Stem Cells in Optic Nerve that Preserve Vision
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain. The finding presents a new theory on why the most common form of glaucoma may develop and potential for new therapies.

Newswise: How airway cells work together in regeneration and aging
Released: 27-Jul-2020 3:55 PM EDT
How airway cells work together in regeneration and aging
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have identified the process by which stem cells in the airways of the lungs switch between two distinct phases — creating more of themselves and producing mature airway cells — to regenerate lung tissue after an injury.

Newswise: The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses
23-Jul-2020 10:55 AM EDT
The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses
Morgridge Institute for Research

A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host’s immune system.

Newswise: Mouse Study Shows Spinal Cord Injury Causes Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome
23-Jul-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Mouse Study Shows Spinal Cord Injury Causes Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Communication between Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells and Fibers Supports Muscle Growth in Mice
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests that communication between skeletal muscle cells and muscle fibers promotes muscle growth. Adult muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, release extracellular vesicles that are delivered to muscle fibers responsible for contraction, to promote this muscle growth. The first-of-its-kind study is published ahead of print in the journal Function.

Newswise: Researchers ID new target in drive to improve immunotherapy for cancer
17-Jul-2020 6:10 PM EDT
Researchers ID new target in drive to improve immunotherapy for cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and UCLA School of Dentistry have identified a potential new combination therapy to treat advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the most common type of head and neck cancer.

Newswise: Sanford Burnham Prebys receives CIRM award for COVID-19 research
Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Sanford Burnham Prebys receives CIRM award for COVID-19 research
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute has received an award from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to advance promising drug candidates for COVID-19. The research team will test two existing drugs against “mini lungs in a dish” that have been infected with SARS-CoV-2.

Newswise:Video Embedded researchers-discover-two-paths-of-aging-and-new-insights-on-promoting-healthspan
VIDEO
13-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Two Paths of Aging and New Insights on Promoting Healthspan
University of California San Diego

Scientists have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend life. The researchers also identified a master circuit that guides these aging processes.

Newswise: Umbilical Cord Blood Successfully Treats Rare Genetic Disorders in Largest Study to Date
Released: 14-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Umbilical Cord Blood Successfully Treats Rare Genetic Disorders in Largest Study to Date
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Infusing umbilical cord blood – a readily available source of stem cells – safely and effectively treated 44 children born with various non-cancerous genetic disorders, including sickle cell, thalassemia, Hunter syndrome, Krabbe disease, MLD, and an array of immune deficiencies.

Newswise: Human Sperm Stem Cells Grown in Lab, an Early Step Toward Infertility Treatment
9-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Human Sperm Stem Cells Grown in Lab, an Early Step Toward Infertility Treatment
University of California San Diego Health

By inhibiting the molecule AKT, UC San Diego researchers favor the culture of human spermatogonial stem cells in the lab, a first step toward lab-produced sperm as a treatment for male infertility.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Team is first in Texas to investigate convalescent plasma for prevention of COVID-19 onset and progression
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A research team is the first in Texas to investigate whether plasma from COVID-19 survivors can be used in outpatient settings to prevent the onset and progression of the virus in two new clinical trials at UTHealth.

Released: 8-Jul-2020 11:05 PM EDT
New Clues from Fruit Flies about the Critical Role of Sex Hormones in Stem Cell Control
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

In one of the first studies addressing the role of sex hormones’ impact on stem cells in the gut, scientists outline new insights showing how a steroidal sex hormone that is structurally and functionally similar to human steroid hormones drastically alters the way intestinal stem cells behave, ultimately affecting the overarching structure and function of this critical organ. The authors found that ecdysone, a steroid hormone produced by fruit flies, stimulates intestinal stem cell growth and causes the gut of the female fruit fly to grow in size, as well as other critical changes.

Newswise: How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
Released: 3-Jul-2020 11:35 AM EDT
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell, reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen plays a critical role in regulating the size of scar tissue in the heart.

Newswise: A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Released: 1-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
A simpler way to make sensory hearing cells
Keck Medicine of USC

USC Stem Cell scientists have pioneered a simpler way to generate the sensory cells of the inner ear. The study was published in the journal eLife.

Newswise: COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
COVID-19: Study Shows Virus Can Infect Heart Cells in Lab Dish
Cedars-Sinai

A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (coronavirus), can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. The discovery, published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, was made using heart muscle cells that were produced by stem cell technology.

Newswise: Poseidon Innovation Announces Funding for Three UC San Diego Researchers
Released: 26-Jun-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Poseidon Innovation Announces Funding for Three UC San Diego Researchers
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego and Deerfield Management created Poseidon Innovation to support researchers working to advance disease-curing therapeutics by funding early stage projects and expediting the drug-development cycle. Poseidon announces it is funding three researchers.

Newswise: Satya Dandekar honored with prestigious NIH MERIT award for HIV research
Released: 22-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Satya Dandekar honored with prestigious NIH MERIT award for HIV research
UC Davis Health

Satya Dandekar, professor of microbiology and chairperson of the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology at UC Davis, honored by Prestigious NIH MERIT award for her illustrious journey in HIV research.

Newswise: UCLA receives nearly $14 million from NIH to investigate gene therapy to combat HIV
Released: 15-Jun-2020 5:10 PM EDT
UCLA receives nearly $14 million from NIH to investigate gene therapy to combat HIV
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers and colleagues have received a $13.65 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate and further develop an immunotherapy known as CAR T, which uses genetically modified stem cells to target and destroy HIV.

Newswise: Putting “Super” in Natural Killer Cells
Released: 11-Jun-2020 1:20 PM EDT
Putting “Super” in Natural Killer Cells
University of California San Diego Health

Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and deleting a key gene, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have created natural killer cells — a type of immune cell — with measurably stronger activity against a form of leukemia, both in vivo and in vitro.

Newswise: Memorial Sloan Kettering – Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership Announces Funding for Inaugural Immunology Research Collaboration Projects
Released: 4-Jun-2020 3:55 PM EDT
Memorial Sloan Kettering – Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership Announces Funding for Inaugural Immunology Research Collaboration Projects
Hackensack Meridian Health

As part of the Memorial Sloan Kettering – Hackensack Meridian Health Partnership, the two organizations have formed an Immunology Research Collaboration. Through this joint initiative, researchers can apply for funding to support innovative investigations to explore the power of the immune system and ways it may be harnessed to fight cancer.

Newswise: NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Penn State College of Engineering

Xiaojun “Lance” Lian, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Penn State, has received a $500,000, five-year Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). 


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