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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693540

RNA Editing Study Shows Potential for More Effective Precision Cancer Treatment

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

If there is one thing all cancers have in common, it is they have nothing in common. A multi-center study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shed light on why proteins, the seedlings that serve as the incubator for many cancers, can vary from cancer to cancer and even patient to patient, a discovery that adds to a growing base of knowledge important for developing more effective precision therapies.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 693371

UT Physicians Offer No-Cost Online Screenings for Varicose Veins

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Finding out if varicose veins warrant medical attention can be done in the comfort of your home, thanks to a service provided by UT Physicians, the clinical practice of McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released:
24-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693267

Size, Structure Help Poziotinib Pose Threat to Deadly Exon 20 Lung Cancer

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A drug that failed to effectively strike larger targets in lung cancer hits a bulls-eye on the smaller target presented by a previously untreatable form of the disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    23-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693256

UTHealth Receives Funding to Study Stem Cell Therapy for Traumatic Injury

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has received funding through a public/private partnership for the first-ever clinical trial investigating a stem cell therapy for early treatment and prevention of complications after severe traumatic injury.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 6:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 693128

Study May Explain Why Some Triple-Negative Breast Cancers Are Resistant to Chemotherapy

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy.

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19-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692992

Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Depression Brings Relief to UTHealth Patient

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Much to her relief, a patient at UTHealth in Houston was one of the first people in North America to undergo an experimental treatment option for people struggling with treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

Released:
17-Apr-2018 3:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692864

Combination Therapy Strengthens T Cells in Melanoma Pre-Clinical Study

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system’s ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. The study was led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released:
16-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692711

Precancerous Colon Polyps in Patients with Lynch Syndrome Exhibit Immune Activation

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Colon polyps from patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that raises colorectal cancer risk, display immune system activation well before cancer development, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical research challenges traditional models of cancer immune activation and suggests immunotherapy may be useful for colorectal cancer prevention in certain high-risk groups.

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13-Apr-2018 4:25 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692789

Boosting T Cell “Memory” May Result in Longer-Lasting and Effective Responses for Patients Treated with Checkpoint Blockade Immunotherapies

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Just like people, some T cells have excellent memories. These subtypes known as memory T cells may explain why some immunotherapies are more effective than others and potentially lead to researchers designing more effective studies using combination checkpoint blockade treatments, according to experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released:
15-Apr-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Apr-2018 9:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 692784

First-in-Human Clinical Trial of New Targeted Therapy Drug Reports Promising Responses for Multiple Cancers

University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A phase I, first-in-human study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reveals for the first time, an investigational drug that is effective and safe for patients with cancers caused by an alteration in the receptor tyrosine kinase known as RET. The drug appears to be promising as a potential therapy for RET-driven cancers, such as medullary and papillary thyroid, non-small cell lung, colorectal and bile duct cancers, which have been historically difficult to treat.

Released:
14-Apr-2018 9:30 AM EDT
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