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18-076MapleLeaf.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698157

Maple Leaf Extract Could Nip Skin Wrinkles in the Bud

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep — and that’s a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Aug-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698170

A New Generation of Artificial Retinas Based on 2D Materials

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world’s first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible device, based on very thin 2D materials, could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. And with a few modifications, the device could be used to track heart and brain activity.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
18-077ContactLenses.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Aug-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698159

The Environmental Cost of Contact Lenses

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don’t last forever — some are intended for a single day’s use — and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists are reporting that throwing these lenses down the drain at the end of their use could be contributing to microplastic pollution in waterways.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
18-087Paperbattery.JPG
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Aug-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698225

A Paper Battery Powered by Bacteria

American Chemical Society (ACS)

— In remote areas of the world or in regions with limited resources, everyday items like electrical outlets and batteries are luxuries. Health care workers in these areas often lack electricity to power diagnostic devices, and commercial batteries may be unavailable or too expensive. New power sources are needed that are low-cost and portable. Today, researchers report a new type of battery –- made of paper and fueled by bacteria --- that could overcome these challenges.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 8:05 AM EDT
WiFiSecuritytinfoilbox_clothes_setup23.jpg

Article ID: 698920

Common WiFi Can Detect Weapons, Bombs and Chemicals in Bags

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Ordinary WiFi can easily detect weapons, bombs and explosive chemicals in bags at museums, stadiums, theme parks, schools and other public venues, according to a Rutgers University–New Brunswick-led study. The researchers’ suspicious object detection system is easy to set up, reduces security screening costs and avoids invading privacy such as when screeners open and inspect bags, backpacks and luggage. Traditional screening typically requires high staffing levels and costly specialized equipment.

Released:
15-Aug-2018 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 698957

Researchers Break Through Intel SGX, Intel's Security Wall

American Technion Society

An international team of researchers has broken through Intel’s innovative security wall, Intel Software Guard Extension (SGX). The attack, dubbed Foreshadow, exploits certain weaknesses in the existing mechanisms of Intel CPUs, allowing an attacker to expose private application data and forge computations secured by SGX.

Released:
14-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT
encryption-010.jpg

Article ID: 698764

Researchers Help Close Security Hole in Popular Encryption Software

Georgia Institute of Technology

Cybersecurity researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have helped close a security vulnerability that could have allowed hackers to steal encryption keys from a popular security package by briefly listening in on unintended “side channel” signals from smartphones.

Released:
9-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 698472

A Kernel of Promise in Popcorn-Powered Robots

Cornell University

Cornell University researchers have discovered how to power simple robots with a novel substance that, when heated, can expand more than 10 times in size, change its viscosity by a factor of 10 and transition from regular to highly irregular granules with surprising force. You can also eat it with a little butter and salt.

Released:
2-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT
ACA2018-Chunhua-Tony-aspirin.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697369

A New Potentially Faster-Acting Aspirin

American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

A team of researchers recently discovered a new aspirin polymorph that’s predicted to dissolve faster than current form I aspirin tablets, which would mean faster pain relief after ingestion. Greater dissolving efficiency also means that each tablet would require less of the compound. Chunhua (Tony) Hu, New York University, will present the painstaking story of aspirin IV alongside its structural definition at the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association.

Released:
12-Jul-2018 1:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jul-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 697398

X-ray Diffraction Method Used to Examine Collagen in the Brain, Heart, and T. rex Fossils

American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

A laboratory at the Illinois Institute of Technology is using fiber diffraction to examine tissue structures in the human brain and heart, as well as in T. rex fossils. Few researchers use this type of X-ray diffraction because of the time and labor required to complete experiments, the researchers have resolved images of the fine threads of collagen fibrils in connective, neurological and dinosaur tissues to one-billionth of a meter. During the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Crystallographic Association, they will explain their work.

Released:
13-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Showing results 3140 of 1186

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