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Newswise: Fetal Balloon Treatment for Lung-Damaging Birth Defect Works Best When Fetal and Maternal Care Are Highly Coordinated

Fetal Balloon Treatment for Lung-Damaging Birth Defect Works Best When Fetal and Maternal Care Are Highly Coordinated

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers from The Johns Hopkins Center for Fetal Therapy report new evidence that fetuses with severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a rare but life-threatening, lung-damaging condition, experience a significantly high rate of success for the fetal treatment known as FETO, if they and their mothers receive coordinated and highly experienced care in the same expert setting.

Channels: All Journal News, Healthcare, OBGYN, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Respiratory Diseases and Disorders,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 10:00 AM EST
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Johns Hopkins Medicine Launches Live Online Speaker Event: HopkinsMedLIVE

Johns Hopkins Medicine

WHAT: Johns Hopkins Medicine is committed to providing the best care for our patients, but we recognize that there is a history of unequal access to health care for many groups. In this live panel discussion, we will discuss bias in medicine with some of our leading researchers and address what we can do to give everyone the opportunity to live a healthy life.

Channels: Healthcare, In the Workplace, Women in Business,

Released:
19-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most common childhood brain cancer, accounting for up to one-third of all cases. Low grade pediatric gliomas arise in brain cells (glia) that support and nourish neurons, and current standard chemotherapies with decades-old drugs, while generally effective in lengthening life, often carry side effects or are not tolerated. Approximately 50% of children treated with traditional therapy have their tumors regrow, underscoring the need for better, targeted treatments.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Children's Health, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Clinical Trials,

Released:
17-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Announcement
Newswise: Rifles and Shotguns Used More Often in Youth and Rural Suicides
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Feb-2020 10:05 AM EST

Rifles and Shotguns Used More Often in Youth and Rural Suicides

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The public has long thought that handguns are more responsible for human deaths, including suicides, than long guns such as rifles and shotguns, which have been believed to be more commonly used for hunting or protection from wild animals. But now, in an analysis of data from 16 years of gun suicides in Maryland, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that long guns were used more often in suicides by kids and teens than by adults, and were more commonly used in suicide by people in rural counties.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Government/Law, Mental Health, Psychology and Psychiatry, Rural Issues, Guns and Violence, Staff Picks,

Released:
10-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
Research Results

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Physicians Propose Quality Measures to Improve Medical Billing
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST

Johns Hopkins Physicians Propose Quality Measures to Improve Medical Billing

Johns Hopkins Medicine

If you’re concerned about rising health care costs and overwhelming medical bills, you’re not alone. According to statistics reported in 2019:

Channels: All Journal News, Budgets and Funding, Healthcare,

Released:
30-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Natural Herb Kratom May Have Therapeutic Effects And Relatively Low Potential For Abuse Or Harm, According To A User Survey

Natural Herb Kratom May Have Therapeutic Effects And Relatively Low Potential For Abuse Or Harm, According To A User Survey

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using results of a survey of more than 2,700 self-reported users of the herbal supplement kratom, sold online and in smoke shops around the U.S., Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that the psychoactive compound somewhat similar to opioids likely has a lower rate of harm than prescription opioids for treating pain, anxiety, depression and addiction.

Channels: All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Public Health, Substance Abuse,

Released:
3-Feb-2020 9:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

Schizophrenia Is A Disease, Not An Extreme of Normal Variation

Johns Hopkins Medicine

“Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and many other types of mental illness, are diseases of the brain and should be treated and studied as such,” say Johns Hopkins researchers.

Channels: All Journal News, Mental Health, Neuro, Psychology and Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Staff Picks,

Released:
29-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Advisory: Resarchers Develop Ultasensitive Blood Test to Predict Recurrence Of Gastric Cancers

Advisory: Resarchers Develop Ultasensitive Blood Test to Predict Recurrence Of Gastric Cancers

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, working with colleagues in the Netherlands, developed a blood test that can predict recurrence of gastric cancer in patients after surgery. A description of their test, which is still experimental, was published online Jan. 27 in the journal Nature Communications.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Genetics, Surgery, Nature (journal),

Released:
28-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Policy
Newswise: Genetic Medicine At Johns Hopkins Gets New Recognition

Genetic Medicine At Johns Hopkins Gets New Recognition

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins was one of the first academic medical centers to recognize the importance of genetics in medicine, establishing divisions of genetics in both the Department of Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics in the late 1950s. Ultimately these units combined, and in 1999 became the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, with an emphasis on understanding the genetic contribution to disease and using this knowledge to develop new treatments and preventive strategies to maintain health. In recognition of the rapidly growing importance of genetics in medicine, Johns Hopkins has launched the Department of Genetic Medicine.

Channels: Education, Genetics, Healthcare, In the Workplace,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published “Viewpoint” articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans’ ability to regulate body temperature.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Announcement


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