American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

Americans continue struggling for a good night’s sleep during the pandemic

Survey finds increase in sleep disturbances reported by U.S. adults

Newswise — DARIEN, IL – The coronavirus pandemic continues to have a negative impact on our sleep, according to new findings from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. In a recent survey, more than half of Americans reported an increase in problems sleeping since the start of the pandemic. 

The AASM surveyed 2,006 adults in the U.S., and 56% indicated that they have experienced an increase in sleep disturbances, sometimes referred to as “COVID-somnia.” Common sleep disturbances included problems falling or staying asleep, sleeping less, experiencing worse quality sleep, and having more disturbing dreams. Those aged 35-44 had the highest rate of COVID-somnia sleep disturbances at 70%. 

“Stress, anxiety and disruptions to our routines can all have a negative impact on our sleep,” said Dr. Fariha Abbasi-Feinberg, a sleep medicine physician in Fort Meyers, Florida, and member of the AASM board of directors. “Unfortunately, sometimes the harder we try to sleep, the more difficult it is to achieve sufficient, healthy sleep.”

The struggle for a good night’s sleep is also leading to an increase in the use of sleep aids. According to the AASM survey, 51% reported using medication, over-the-counter supplements, or other substances to help them fall asleep, while 68% of those using sleep aids acknowledged that they’ve been using them more frequently during the pandemic. Of those using sleep aids, only five percent said they use them rarely.

“Medicinal sleep aids should be used cautiously for people with sleep problems and should always be used in consultation with a medical provider,” said Abbasi-Feinberg. “Many patients find that appropriate sleep hygiene will help them get better sleep, while those with chronic insomnia will benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, which includes strategies such as stimulus control, sleep restriction and relaxation therapy.”

Abbasi-Feinberg suggests adopting healthy sleep habits and following these tips to address short-term insomnia:

  • Keep a consistent sleep schedule. Get up at the same time every day, even on weekends or during vacations.
  • Set a bedtime that is early enough for you to get at least 7 hours of sleep.
  • Don’t go to bed unless you are sleepy.
  • If you don’t fall asleep after 20 minutes, get out of bed.
  • Establish a relaxing bedtime routine.
  • Use your bed only for sleep and sex.
  • Make your bedroom quiet and relaxing. Keep the room at a comfortable, cool temperature.
  • Limit exposure to bright light in the evenings.
  • Turn off electronic devices at least 30 minutes before bedtime.
  • Don’t eat a large meal before bedtime. If you are hungry at night, eat a light, healthy snack.
  • Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy diet.
  • Avoid consuming caffeine in the late afternoon or evening.
  • Avoid consuming alcohol before bedtime.
  • Reduce your fluid intake before bedtime.

For chronic insomnia, which involves trouble sleeping at least three times a week for at least three months, help is available from more than 2,700 AASM-accredited sleep centers.

“Sleep is important to our overall health, and it boosts the immune system and strengthens the effectiveness of vaccination, so don’t ignore persistent sleep problems,” said Abbasi-Feinberg. “Talk to your medical provider if you’re struggling to sleep well on a regular basis.”

###

To request a copy of the AASM Sleep Prioritization Survey COVID-somnia results, or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson, please contact the AASM at 630-737-9700 or [email protected].

About the Survey

The March 2021 AASM Sleep Prioritization Survey involved 2,006 adult participants in the U.S. The margin of error is +/- 2 percentage points with a confidence interval of 95 percent. Atomik Research, an independent market research agency, conducted the survey.

About the American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Established in 1975, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is advancing sleep care and enhancing sleep health to improve lives. The AASM has a combined membership of 11,000 accredited member sleep centers and individual members, including physicians, scientists and other health care professionals (aasm.org).




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5659
Released: 18-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Analysis Suggesting Measles, Polio and Tuberculosis Vaccines May Boost Immunity to Coronavirus
Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Maryland scientists, who are also members of the Global Virus Network (GVN), a coalition comprised of human and animal virologists from 63 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 35 countries, and colleagues today published a perspective proposing that live attenuated vaccines (LAVs), such as those for tuberculosis, measles, and polio, may induce protective innate immunity that mitigate other infectious diseases, triggering the human body’s natural emergency response to infections including COVID-19 as well as future pandemic threats.

Newswise: Researchers Call for More Transparency from Russia’s Sputnik COVID Vaccine
Released: 18-May-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Researchers Call for More Transparency from Russia’s Sputnik COVID Vaccine
Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO)

Inconsistencies, potential problems, and lack of access give researchers cause for concern's about the secretive development process.

Newswise: Survey: Despite Similar Levels of Vaccine Hesitancy, White People More Likely to Be Vaccinated Than Black People
Released: 18-May-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Survey: Despite Similar Levels of Vaccine Hesitancy, White People More Likely to Be Vaccinated Than Black People
Tufts University

White people are more likely to have been vaccinated than Black people despite similar levels of vaccine hesitancy, or saying they are very unlikely to get a vaccine. Therefore, access to vaccines and other factors could be limiting vaccination efforts, according to a new, nationally representative study from the Tufts University Research Group on Equity in Health, Wealth and Civic Engagement.

Newswise: How X-rays Could Make Reliable, Rapid COVID-19 Tests a Reality
Released: 18-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
How X-rays Could Make Reliable, Rapid COVID-19 Tests a Reality
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Vaccines are turning the tide of the pandemic, but there's still a risk of COVID-19 infections. Instant at-home tests would help us return to normal, but current options aren't very accurate. A new discovery could get reliable tests on the market.

Newswise: Central PA residents had high knowledge, worries of information overload early in pandemic
Released: 18-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Central PA residents had high knowledge, worries of information overload early in pandemic
Penn State College of Medicine

Residents of central Pennsylvania had the information they needed to slow the spread of COVID-19 early on in the pandemic, but were overwhelmed with worries about mixed messages and distrust of some sources, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.

Released: 18-May-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Black, Hispanic and Asian populations bore the brunt of the nation-wide rise in cardiovascular deaths during COVID-19 pandemic, researchers find
Beth Israel Lahey Health

A team at BIDMC found that the year-over-year increase in deaths due to heart disease and cerebrovascular disease was significantly more pronounced among Black, Hispanic and Asian populations in the United States than in the non-Hispanic white population.

Released: 18-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE
American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.

Released: 18-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET
Newswise

How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET


Showing results

110 of 5659

close
1.40388