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Newswise: Sleeping with artificial light at night associated with weight gain in women

Article ID: 714159

Sleeping with artificial light at night associated with weight gain in women

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Sleeping with a television or light on in a room may be a risk factor for gaining weight or developing obesity, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health. The research, published online June 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine, suggests that cutting off lights at bedtime could reduce women’s chances of becoming obese.

Released:
10-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jun-2019 1:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 713700

Study Links Poor Sleep with Poor Nutrition

American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep, and many do not consume the recommended amounts of important vitamins and minerals. A new study suggests the two factors may be connected.

Released:
3-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714122

Teens sleep longer, are more alert for homework when school starts later

American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM)

Preliminary findings from a new study of middle school and high school students suggest that they got more sleep and were less likely to feel too sleepy to do homework after their district changed to later school start times.

Released:
7-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Study links irregular sleep patterns to metabolic disorders

Article ID: 713971

Study links irregular sleep patterns to metabolic disorders

NIH, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI)

A new study has found that not sticking to a regular bedtime and wakeup schedule--and getting different amounts of sleep each night--can put a person at higher risk for obesity

Released:
5-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713630

Lack of Sleep May Increase Likelihood of Teens Engaging in Risky Sexual Behaviors

American Psychological Association (APA)

Teenagers who don’t get enough sleep may be at an increased risk of engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released:
29-May-2019 3:40 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 713678

UCI research helps shed new light on circadian clocks

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 30, 2019 – Can your liver sense when you’re staring at a television screen or cellphone late at night? Apparently so, and when such activity is detected, the organ can throw your circadian rhythms out of whack, leaving you more susceptible to health problems. That’s one of the takeaways from two new studies by University of California, Irvine scientists working in collaboration with the Institute for Research in Biomedicine in Barcelona, Spain.

Released:
30-May-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 713599

Researchers explore the epigenetics of daytime sleepiness

Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Everyone feels tired at times, but up to 20 percent of U.S. adults report feeling so sleepy during the day that it interferes with daily activities, including working, having meals or carrying on conversations.

Released:
29-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Jaw Movement and Machine Learning May Diagnose Sleep Apnea
  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2019 2:45 PM EDT

Article ID: 712503

Jaw Movement and Machine Learning May Diagnose Sleep Apnea

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Using machine learning to analyze jaw movements during sleep, doctors may be able to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in patients with mild to severe OSA with an accuracy comparable to polysomnography, the gold standard for OSA diagnosis,

Released:
13-May-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713248

Sleep problems in teenagers reversed in just one week by limiting screen use

European Society of Endocrinology

Sleep in teenagers can be improved by just one week of limiting their evening exposure to light-emitting screens on phones

Released:
21-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT

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