Washington University in St. Louis

For breastfeeding moms, COVID-19 vaccinations may also protect babies

Major boost in COVID-19 antibodies seen in breast milk after vaccination

Newswise — Nursing mothers who receive a COVID-19 vaccine may pass protective antibodies to their babies through breast milk for at least 80 days following vaccination, suggests new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

“Our study showed a huge boost in antibodies against the COVID-19 virus in breast milk starting two weeks after the first shot, and this response was sustained for the course of our study, which was almost three months long,” said first author Jeannie Kelly, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology. “The antibodies levels were still high at the end of our study, so the protection likely extends even longer.”

Based on the small study, involving five mothers who provided frozen breast milk samples after receiving the two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine, the research provides some of the first peer-reviewed evidence that breastfeeding confers a long-lasting immune response in the nursing infants and toddlers of vaccinated mothers.

“There is so much vaccine misinformation out there right now – really scary, misleading posts on social media that are designed to scare moms – so we felt like we needed to look at the science,” Kelly said. “We know that these types of antibodies coat babies mouths and throats and protect against disease when a baby is drinking breast milk. So, getting vaccinated while breastfeeding not only protects mom, but also could protect the baby, too, and for months.”

Published March 30 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study tracked levels of COVID-19 antibodies in breast milk from a baseline before the mothers’ first vaccinations and on a weekly basis for 80 days after those initial vaccinations.

While other recent research has shown that COVID-19 vaccines generate antibodies that are passed to nursing infants through breast milk, this is thought to be the first study to track specific levels of these antibodies in breast milk over an extended time period.

The babies of women included in the study ranged in age from one month to 24 months old. To gauge immune response in the breast milk, researchers monitored levels of the immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, which are antibodies deployed by the immune system to fight infections in babies.

Findings confirm that breast milk contains elevated levels of the IgA and IgG antibodies immediately following the first dose of vaccination, with both antibodies reaching immune-significant levels within 14 to 20 days of first vaccination in all participants.

“Our study is limited by a small number of participants, but the findings provide encouraging news about the potential immune benefit to breast-feeding infants after vaccination,” said study senior author Misty Good, MD, an assistant professor of pediatrics, also at Washington University. “Our paper is the first that has shown COVID-19 antibodies persist in breast milk for months following the mother’s vaccination.”

The Washington University findings are similar to prior studies on maternal vaccination, which have shown high levels of antibodies in breast milk for up to six months following vaccination for influenza and whooping cough.

While further studies of maternal COVID-19 vaccination are needed to characterize the length of antibody production in breast milk and the effect on infant infection rates, recent research continues to confirm that the COVID-19 vaccine offers real benefits for protecting both mother and child.

“We do know that COVID-19 infection is more severe during pregnancy and the main benefit of vaccination is to provide protection for moms before they become really sick, which can also be dangerous to their fetus,” Kelly said. “There have now been almost 70,000 pregnant people vaccinated against COVID 19 with no evidence of harm.”

“We’re now seeing a cascade of new data that indicate maternal vaccines are also going to help protect babies — both through transfer of antibodies through the placenta during pregnancy and through the breast milk during lactation,” Kelly said. “This is information we didn’t have a few months ago and it’s really helping us better counsel our patients who are considering getting the vaccine. I’m telling my pregnant and breastfeeding moms that I strongly recommend that they get vaccinated as soon as possible.”

 

 

 

Kelly JC, Carter EB, Raghuraman N, Nolan LS, Gong Q, Lewis AN, Good M. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies induced in breast milk after Pfizer-BioNTech/BNT162b2 vaccination. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. March 30, 2021. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2021.03.031

This research is supported, in part, by the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences which is, in part, supported by the NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) grant number UL1TR002345; the Foundation for Barnes-Jewish Hospital; The PEW Charitable Trusts Community Opioid Response and Evaluation (CORE); the National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant numbers 5T32HD043010 and R01DK118568; an American Academy of Pediatrics Marshall Klaus Award; the St. Louis Children’s Hospital Foundation; the Children’s Discovery Institute of Washington University and St. Louis Children’s Hospital; and the Department of Pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine.

Washington University School of Medicine’s 1,500 faculty physicians also are the medical staff of Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children’s hospitals. The School of Medicine is a leader in medical research, teaching and patient care, consistently ranking among the top medical schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Through its affiliations with Barnes-Jewish and St. Louis Children’s hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to BJC HealthCare.

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY



Filters close

Showing results

110 of 6110
Released: 2-Aug-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Rethinking Remdesivir
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers modify remdesivir, creating oral version that can be taken earlier in COVID-19 diagnoses. In cell and animal studies, revised drug proved effective and safe.

Newswise: Researchers from Hackensack Meridian University Medical Center and Colleagues Develop New Model to Help Clinicians Predict Risk of Death in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19
Released: 2-Aug-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Researchers from Hackensack Meridian University Medical Center and Colleagues Develop New Model to Help Clinicians Predict Risk of Death in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19
Hackensack Meridian Health

New COVID-19 40-day mortality risk model, published in The Public Library of Science ONE, has potential for use in patient treatment planning, comparisons of therapeutic strategies, and public-health preparations.

Released: 2-Aug-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Town Hall on Effectiveness of COVID-19 Vaccination in Immunosuppressed Patients Hosted by the American College of Rheumatology
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

How effective COVID-19 vaccines have been in immunosuppressed and rheumatic disease patients remains an incompletely answered question. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has organized an expert panel to share what we are learning from real-world data and answer questions.

Released: 2-Aug-2021 2:00 PM EDT
CDC withdrawing its request for emergency use authorization for its COVID-19 PCR diagnostic test does not mean the test failed
Newswise

Social media is now rife with claims about why the CDC is withdrawing its request for emergency use authorization for its COVID-19 PCR diagnostic test after December 2021.

Newswise: Existing Drug Is Shown to Inhibit Virus That Causes COVID-19
Released: 2-Aug-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Existing Drug Is Shown to Inhibit Virus That Causes COVID-19
Argonne National Laboratory

Scientists using the Advanced Photon Source have discovered that a drug used to fight tumors in animals might be effective against many types of coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2.

Released: 2-Aug-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Award-Winning Journalist and CDC Principal Investigator to Serve as ACR Convergence 2021 Keynote Speaker
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)

Convergence 2021, the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), returns to a virtual meeting platform Nov. 1 - 10. This year’s meeting will include presentations from over 320 clinicians, researchers and health experts, including this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Seema Yasmin.

Newswise: COVID-19: Small Sign of Hope as Vaccinations Rise
Released: 2-Aug-2021 10:45 AM EDT
COVID-19: Small Sign of Hope as Vaccinations Rise
Cedars-Sinai

As COVID-19 cases spike in Los Angeles and throughout the Golden State, driven by the spread of the delta variant among unvaccinated residents, there may be a small sign of hope: More people are finally getting their shot.

Newswise: New Evidence Shows the COVID-19 Delta Variant Rapidly Rising
Released: 31-Jul-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New Evidence Shows the COVID-19 Delta Variant Rapidly Rising
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

The University’s coronavirus sequencing effort uncovered that there are several variants present in its patient population, but Delta is chief among them and easily transmitted. And its presence is likely triggering a local surge in the infectious disease. University of Miami researchers and physicians are seeing firsthand how rapidly the Delta variant of COVID-19 is spreading through the local population.

Released: 30-Jul-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Thinking Impaired in 60% of COVID-19 Survivors, Study Finds
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

In a sample of over 400 older adults in Argentina who had recovered from COVID-19, more than 60% displayed some degree of cognitive impairment, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio reported July 29 at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.


Showing results

110 of 6110

close
1.18982