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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708184

Tracking Cholera in a Drop of Blood

University of Utah Health

A multi-institutional, international team of researchers has developed a method that identifies individuals recently infected with Vibrio cholerae O1. The results of the study are available online in the February 20 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Released:
18-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 708336

MSU Technologies Lead to Better Survival, Bigger Catfish for Mississippi Producers

Mississippi State University

Mississippi State-developed vaccination technologies are being commercialized to help the catfish industry save millions for the state that leads the nation in production.

Released:
19-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708139

Researchers find trigger that turns strep infections into flesh-eating disease

Houston Methodist

Houston Methodist scientists discovered a previously unknown trigger that turns run-of-the-mill strep infections into the flesh-eating disease childbed fever, which strikes postpartum moms and newborns, often leaving victims without limbs. Using an unprecedented approach, they looked at the interplay between the genome, transcriptome and virulence. This generated a massive data set, lending itself to artificial intelligence analysis. Through AI they unexpectedly discovered a new mechanism controlling virulence. The study appears Feb. 18 in Nature Genetics.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 4:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708133

Immune Profiling: A New Opportunity for Drug Development

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Collectively, assessing a snapshot of a person’s unique state of immune health is called immune profiling, which can entail identifying immune-cell-associated genes and proteins, as well as the cell types themselves.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 3:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708127

When Research Participation Pays, Some People Lie, Penn Study Suggests

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Offering compensation can be an important tactic to attract potential participants for enrollment in research studies, but it might come at a cost. A new study conducted by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that up to 23 percent of respondents lied about their eligibility to participate in a survey when offered payment, even small amounts.

Released:
14-Feb-2019 2:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2019 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708033

Supercomputing Effort Reveals Antibody Secrets

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Using sophisticated gene sequencing and computing techniques, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the San Diego Supercomputer Center have achieved a first-of-its-kind glimpse into how the body’s immune system gears up to fight off infection.

Released:
13-Feb-2019 11:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Feb-2019 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 707379

Micromotors deliver oral vaccines

American Chemical Society (ACS)

Vaccines have saved millions of lives, but nobody likes getting a shot. That’s why scientists are trying to develop oral vaccines for infectious diseases. But to be effective, the vaccine must survive digestion and reach immune cells within the intestinal wall. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine.

Released:
1-Feb-2019 10:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    4-Feb-2019 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 707365

Diversity in the CD4 Receptor Protects Chimpanzees from Infection by AIDS-like Viruses

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

An international team of collaborators found that the CD4 surface protein, which is used by HIV and SIV as the receptor to enter immune cells, is highly variable among wild chimpanzees.

Released:
31-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST

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