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University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center treats its first glioblastoma patient with genetically modified poliovirus

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center treated its first patient in a new clinical trial to validate the groundbreaking effects of the poliovirus on glioblastoma (GBM), a deadly Grade IV cancer of the brain. UH is the only Midwest site participating in this clinical trial, which was initiated at Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. The original study, which ran from 2012-2017, was published in New England Journal of Medicine in July 2018 as well as highlighted on “60 Minutes” in 2015 and again in 2018. The study found that survival rates were significantly higher in glioblastoma patients who received an intratumoral infusion of a modified viral chimera combining the polio and rhinoviruses (PVSRIPO immunotherapy) compared to patients receiving standard treatment at the same institution.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Healthcare, Immunology, Neuro, Surgery, NEJM,

Released:
24-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 5:00 PM EST
Released:
22-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Overcoming HIV latency – activating HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant – is a needed step toward a cure. Scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics – a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare – showed it’s possible to drive HIV out of latency in two animal models.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, Blood, Healthcare, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 11:10 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Researchers: Climate Change Threatens to Unlock New Microbes and Increase Heat-Related Illness and Death

Johns Hopkins Medicine

The Journal of Clinical Investigation (JCI) recently published “Viewpoint” articles by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine professors who warn that global climate change is likely to unlock dangerous new microbes, as well as threaten humans’ ability to regulate body temperature.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Diabetes, Digestive Disorders, Environmental Health, Environmental Science, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Public Health, Staff Picks,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
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Released:
22-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Lung Microbiome May Help Predict Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

Lung Microbiome May Help Predict Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Changes in the lung microbiome may help predict how well critically ill patients will respond to care, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Channels: Healthcare, Immunology, Microbiome, Respiratory Diseases and Disorders, All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 4:00 PM EST
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Certain liver cells may help prevent organ rejection after transplant and other conditions, study finds

Mayo Clinic

Mesenchymal stromal cells from fat tissue and bone marrow are widely used in therapeutic trials for their anti-inflammatory qualities, but new Mayo Clinic research finds that liver cells may be of greater value. The study, published in Liver Transplantation, finds that liver mesenchymal stromal cells have immunoregulatory qualities that make them more effective than similar cells derived from adipose, or fat, tissue and bone marrow.

Channels: Immunology, Kidney Disease, Liver Disease, Transplantation, All Journal News,

Released:
20-Jan-2020 2:25 PM EST
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Newswise: Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

University of Alabama at Birmingham

The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb — as young as 11 weeks after conception — already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. How the microbes or microbial products reach those organs before birth is not known.

Channels: All Journal News, Immunology, Microbiome, OBGYN, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 12:50 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Mosquitoes Engineered to Repel Dengue Virus

University of California San Diego

An international team of scientists has synthetically engineered mosquitoes that halt the transmission of the dengue virus. The development marks the first engineered approach in mosquitoes that targets the four known types of dengue, improving upon previous designs that addressed single strains.

Channels: Children's Health, Engineering, Immunology, Zika Virus, Southeast Asia News, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 2:55 PM EST
Research Results


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