Alison  Buttenheim, PhD

Alison Buttenheim, PhD

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

Professor & Scientific Director, Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics

Expertise: vaccincesVaccine hesitancyCOVID -19Social DisparitiesHealth DisparitiesHIVHiv TreatmentHIV carebehavioral health economics

Using insights from behavioral economics and related disciplines, Dr. Buttenheim designs and trials interventions to change behaviors that are central to infectious disease prevention. Her work spans Chagas disease prevention campaigns in Peru and HIV testing and treatment efforts in South Africa to vaccine acceptance and COVID-19 mitigation strategies in the US.
Dr. Buttenheim’s research is focused on the application of behavioral insights to infectious disease prevention, and to the implementation of evidence-based practices in multiple domains. She has been continuously NIH-funded as PI or MPI since 2013 for projects on Chagas disease prevention, vaccine exemptions, dental behavior change, and mental health services delivery. With a particular interest in behaviorally-informed intervention design, Dr. Buttenheim has published multiple papers demonstrating the potential for behavioral insights and behavioral design to yield high-impact intervention designs.


Title

Cited By

Year

Twitter as a tool for health research: a systematic review

418

2017

Urban food environments and residents’ shopping behaviors

187

2013

Nonmedical exemptions from school immunization requirements: a systematic review

162

2014

Parental vaccine concerns, information source, and choice of alternative immunization schedules

121

2013

Community pharmacies as sites of adult vaccination: a systematic review

116

2016

The sanitation environment in urban slums: implications for child health

107

2008

Impact evaluation of school feeding programmes in Lao People's Democratic Republic

95

2011

Twitter as a potential data source for cardiovascular disease research

89

2016

Ethnic diversity, traditional norms, and marriage behaviour in Indonesia

79

2009

Do Mexican immigrants “import” social gradients in health to the US?

76

2010

Behaviorally informed strategies for a national COVID-19 vaccine promotion program

75

2021

“Everybody just wants to do what's best for their child”: Understanding how pro-vaccine parents can support a culture of vaccine hesitancy

73

2015

A megastudy of text-based nudges encouraging patients to get vaccinated at an upcoming doctor’s appointment

70

2021

Marriage and socioeconomic change in contemporary Indonesia

64

2008

Increasing supplemental nutrition assistance program/electronic benefits transfer sales at farmers' markets with vendor-operated wireless point-of-sale terminals

61

2012

Do women increase their use of reproductive health care when it becomes more available? Evidence from Indonesia

59

2009

Barriers to dog rabies vaccination during an urban rabies outbreak: Qualitative findings from Arequipa, Peru

56

2017

Elimination of nonmedical immunization exemptions in California and school-entry vaccine status

55

2019

Maintenance of smoking cessation in the postpartum period: which interventions work best in the long-term?

45

2014

Comparison of online survey recruitment platforms for hard-to-reach pregnant smoking populations: Feasibility study

44

2018

“We know that this disease has disproportionately burdened some groups. We also know that these groups are the least likely to report being excited about getting a vaccine,” she adds. “Initially, we’re going to have scarce supply, and there’s a worry that this will all contribute to worsening disparities and inequities.”

- How can the world allocate COVID-19 vaccines fairly?

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